Levi’s 501 – The story behind Launderette

The opening bars of Marvin Gaye’s hit I Heard It Through The Grapevine are among the most evocative in television advertising history. For a whole generation, at least, those first few moody seconds only bring one image to mind – that of model Nick Kamen walking into a launderette. The ad might not have been set in the eighties (more likely a mythical fifties), but for many those first few seconds can evoke memories of an entire decade. But Nick Kamen (who only got the part on condition he lost weight) wasn’t the first to get his kit off in a launderette. An early Hamlet ad showed a bowler-hatted, be-suited gent undressing in front of a group of women and sticking his clothes, and even his hat, in a washing machine. Sadly, no one remembers the actor’s name. And, as far as we know, he never had a hit single written for him by Madonna…

Kamen’s “Lauderette” was shown for the first time on Boxing Day 1985. Thought up by John Hegarty and Barbara Noakes of BBH, the ad campaign was designed to try and save Levi’s flagging fortunes; the company was under attack from all sorts of other fashionable brands. In short, Levi’s (which had been going since the 1850s) were becoming the sort of jeans worn by people’s dads. And not even trendy dads – it was middle-aged “fuddy duddies” wearing “polyester Levi’s Action Slacks”. Research showed that the intended target audience for Levi’s 501 (15 to 19 year olds) saw the United States of the fifties and sixties as cool time and place in history: James Dean, Elvis Presley and Sam Cooke all belonged to this mythical, wondrous world. Unless the ad agencies came up with something new, the alternative was going with the American campaign for 501, which was all about how well the jeans fitted in the United States of Ronald Reagan. The image seemed the opposite of MTV and European chic.

So, director Roger Lyons was given the go-ahead to film an ad that showed drop dead gorgeous model Nick Kamen stripping down to his boxer shorts, while flustered women and bemused elders looked on, and then sitting and waiting while his jeans were in the wash. All this and Marvin Gaye thrown in too. (Except it wasn’t actually Marvin Gaye but a newly recorded “session” version of the song, though the original was later re-released off the back of the ad and entered the charts all over again…). “Grapevine” was the first of four Levi’s-related songs to all make the Top Ten, a feat that made advertisers realise that choosing the right music was of paramount importance because it really could help push a product on TV. They call it “Integrated Marketing”, and it meant a single in the chart and an ad on the box simultaneously, as well as the 501 logo alongside the artist’s name on the record sleeve in every record shop in Britain and USA.

Kate Thornton, a famous English journalist, was a schoolgirl at the time and remembers the effect that Kamen’s striptease had on her: “I remember that the ad was running at a cinema before a movie, and I hadn’t seen it on the tely at that point. So I went to the cinema just to see the ad…” she says. “The commercial made those jeans sexy at a time when Levi’s were struggling to make their product appealing to women of my age, and really that’s where the big spenders come from. Suddenly those jeans became a must-heve item! I only wanted them because Nick Kamen wore them and took them off…”

Thornton wasn’t the only teenager to feel that away. Consumers wrote in to Levi’s in their thousands asking for picture of Kamen. Meanwhile, sales of 501 shot up by an incredible 800% in the wake of the ad, which eventually had to be taken off the air because the Company couldn’t produce enough jeans to meet the new demand… By 1987 sales of Levi’s jeans were reported to be 20 times what they had been just three years earlier. The commercial also boosted sales of boxer shorts to a record high, though the ad agency only put Kamen in a pair of boxers because they weren’t allowed to show their hero in a pair of jockeys. And it wasn’t just teenage girl buying the jeans: boys were impressed by what Kamen could do. “The ad said: wear Levi’s jeans and you’ll be a rebel without a cause!” says psychologist Dr David Lewis. “You’ll be able to alienate older people (who young people despite anyway) and you can be cool…”

Inevitably, Nick Kamen was suddenly flavour of the month. Madonna wrote a song for him called “Each Time You Break My Heart” which made it into Top Ten. Kamen was soon a fully-fledged pop star, but his new career was short lived. Subsequent singles failed and Kamen moved to Los Angeles where he was to live for a time with British television presenter  Amanda de Cadenet. “There wasn’t life for Nick Kamen after Levi’s because he broke the rule…he talked!” says Thornton. “We just liked looking at him. It was as simple as that. He was a model and he just had these smouldering beautiful looks… but fundamentally he was to be looked at and lusted over, and never to be taken seriously…”. Nick Kamen turned a new Levi’s ad into a much-hyped media event and ended up eventually being replaced in 1999 by a fluffy yellow pupped called Flat Eric…

(Mark Robinson, The Sunday Times)

Advertising Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty 
Creative: John Hegarty, Greg Mills, Barbara Nokes
Director: Roger Lyons
Production: Mike Dufficy & Partners
Director of Photography: Richard Greatrex
Editor: Ian Weil
Music: Karl Jenkins, Mike Ratledge
Year: 1985

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Wieden + Hegarty – 30 years of Creative Chaos

What are the reasons behind a successful commercial – is it the craft, the execution or great story telling, and what has made campaigns stand out over decades? On the fifth day of the 59th International Festival of Creativity, Sir John Hegarty, worldwide creative director and Dan Wieden, co-founder and global executive creative director, Wieden+Kennedy (W+K) discussed the elements that make a campaign successful, while speaking on the topic, ’30 years of creative chaos’.

The session—celebrating the 30th anniversary of both Wieden + Kennedy and Bartle Bogle Hegarty—began with an amusing video in which Wieden, to compete with the knighted Hegarty, gets a handful of degrees and ordainments through the Internet so he can be introduced as Lord Rev. Dr. Dan Wieden. The comical mock one-upmanship continued throughout the talk—moderated by Atifa Silk of Campaign Asia-Pacific—as the two legendary creatives alternately praised and teased one another following the screening of each spot.

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“I have enormous empathy for Dan’s work…,” Hegarty said. “I remember when I suddenly started seeing this work—Instant Karma—coming out of this American agency for Nike. I had to find out who they were. Where are they? Portland, Oregon? Where is Oregon?”

The session started by talking about Nike’s long term association with W+K, and how over the years the sports brand has worked with the agency, trusting and believing in its every work. To this, Wieden said, “Nike is a very different client as the company does not believe in airing one TVC several times. Interestingly, the company also does not believe in advertising, it believes in creating an experience. When I came to know about this, I enquired about this quite unique approach. The company representative replied, ‘You never write the same letter twice, then why the same spot?”

Agreeing with him, Sir Hegarty cited the example of the Nike commercial featuring golfer Tiger Woods. “Earl and Tiger” ad for Nike Golf, which aired in the wake of the golfer’s sex scandal. It shows a stoic Woods looking into the camera as his late father, heard in voiceover, urges him to reflect on his life. He said, “In order to break away from the usual and to create something unusual, a brand has to be constantly brave. A brave brand will be ready to take risks, and will further allow the agency to create unusual and interesting campaigns.”

Sir Hegarty next talked about the ‘Go forth’ TVC for Levis by W+K, called ‘America’s challenging time’. “There are times when due to the scale, it becomes difficult to use one language to unify different countries with different dialects. In such situations, one needs to conceptualise one single idea, which will bring everybody to a common platform,” he remarked.

Wieden, in turn, first became aware of Hegarty’s work with the Levi’s ad of  “a young man walking into a laundry room and taking off his clothes.” “You keep stumbling across opportunities, an idea reveals itself within an idea,” said Hegarty on the inspiration behind the ad. “In a Levi’s ad there’s always someone getting dressed or undressed.”

But, how the foundation client has overpowered the agency’s business?

According to Wieden, in case of W+K, Nike was the only visible client for a long time and while the agency had the business of a small radio station from Portland, the fact is that its survival was mainly dependent on one client; this made the agency uncomfortable. So, while foundation clients are important for any agency, there is also a need to branch out.

Next, speaking on the power of creativity, Sir Hegarty elaborated, “Advertising is 80 per cent idea and 20 per cent execution – and we live in a world of YouTube – where everyone can make everything, so it is important to be both perfect in detailing and in storytelling.”

Adding to his view point, Wieden said, “Emotions need to be depicted in the right form and it is not necessary that one always has to go the social media way to depict emotions. Rather, telling simple stories with great emotions can move the consumers.”

But sometimes ideas aren’t enough and it’s the execution that pulls the ad through, commented Hegarty on W+K’s “Best Job” TV commercial for P&G. “If you had passed me the script I think I might have vomited. You Americans, you wade around in this treacle of emotion…” said Hegarty wryly. “But the way you [Wieden] executed it really worked….The vomit factor was high…but the directing worked.” “It’s the power of storytelling, you’ve got to make sure the emotions are relevant and just let yourselves be swept up by it,” agreed Wieden.

Sir Hegarty discussed the campaign called ‘Dean Savage’ for Google Chrome, and how it turned a brand which is usually perceived to be unemotional to emotional. “Some of the best advertising, is not advertising”, continued Hegarty, referring to Google Chrome’s support of the ” It gets better” initiative. The work done by BBH NY could have easily backfired on the company, said Hegarty. “We tried to put it into a place that wasn’t advertising, that was part of the social fabric of life.”

“When you do your job right, you add something to the value of the brand, not just for the audience but for the people who work there,” commented Wieden. “Google is perceived as a less emotional group of people but when a spot like that comes out, it humanises them.”

Sir Hegarty next focused on the importance of motivation. “In this industry, one gets motivated via competition’s work. The ‘Old Spice’ ad is a spectacular example of good work and when I watched it I felt jealous. However, two minutes later, I was determined to do better work for Axe. Therefore, in order to do great work, we need competition to succeed, as then at that time even clients fuel up, which further motivates to create good work,” he noted.

“When truly great work happens, and it isn’t yours, the gut instinct is to hate it with a passion”, said Hegarty. “I remember the moment one of our account people came to me and said, ‘John, I think you’d better have a look at this,”—it was the first ad for Old Spice. “You know something’s great when you really really f***ing hate it. I hated it. I stood up, looked at this ad and thought, ‘Who did that? Is it W+K? SHIT! OhSHIT!’.” Then Hegarty recalled running out of the office and yelling for the latest scripts for Axe, their agency’s rival brand to Old Spice. “We had to do better! The better they do! The better we do! Great creativity drives each other, two people run a race faster than alone.” The Old Spice ads were a prime example of great writing, he concluded.

“I had the same hateful reaction when the Xbox ‘Life’s too Short’ spot came out,” admitted Wieden.

Like the Levi’s laundry ad, the Xbox commercial was entirely done without script, noted Wieden. “It was the craft of the spot that pulled it completely into superspace.” Commercials like these are only possible when clients are brave, said Hegarty. “You can imagine us presenting this to Xbox, ‘She’s got her legs like this… and…’ The client rejected it, but we got it posted online and it went viral—never give up, keep pushing.”

The two agencies have even ‘swapped’ clients. BBH resigned Nike which went to W+K and BBH won Guardian off W+K. The result of the change was the Levi’s Go Forth ad and Guardian’s Gold Lion-winning “Three Little Pigs commercial. “I’m pleased that Levi’s went to you and not the agency before us, which I cannot name, but they produced unutterable crap,” chuckled Hegarty. “W+K, however, told Levi’s story in a powerful and compelling way.”

Taking the example of the commercial for the UK-based newspaper, The Guardian, Sir Hegarty said, “It is all about the art of storytelling and we should master how to tell the simplest of the stories in the most interesting way.”

Asked how the industry should evolve and improve, both men, not surprisingly, said it’s all about the quality of the work. “Make the bloody work better,” Hegarty said. “I keep going on about it. We must be the only industry in the world that actually thinks you can succeed when the work’s getting worse. There’s empirical evidence in the U.K. that our audience believes the advertising has gotten worse. … Obviously, Cannes is about this question. But what are we doing about it? How are we working to make the work better?”

It needs to be honest, too,” said Wieden. “There’s so much strategy sometimes, and all this bullshit. What is the emotional essence of this issue right now? And clients, I think, sometimes have to look at themselves in the mirror and say, ‘Who have we become? How do we get back to where we used to be?’ “


Have you ever noticed that the first TV and Press Grand Prix were italian?

1954. European cinema contractors launch the Festival to celebrate great cinema advertising. The first Cannes Grand Prix goes to a spot called “Il Circo” from Italy’s Ferry Mayer for Chlorodont toothpaste.

1992. The Press and Poster category introduced. McCann-Erickson Milan is awarded first Grand Prix in the category for its Levi’s campaign.

Advertising Agency:  McCann-Erickson Italia
Creative Director: Milka Pogliani
Copywriter: Alessandro Canale
Art Director: Stefano Colombo
Photographer: Graham Ford

Good Luck Italy.


Cannes Alternative Grand Prix (2001/2011)

Grand Prix 2001 – FOX Regional Sports (Turkey/China/Russia/India)

A Turkish sports reporter is at a cliff-diving tournament. A diver jumps off a steep cliff, goes into a ‘swan dive’ and lands on dirt. Turkish peasants clap politely. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

A Chinese sports reporter is showing highlights of a ‘tree catching’ competition. We see two lumberjacks chop down a giant 200-ft tree for an athlete to catch. He is not successful. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

A Russian sports reporter is covering a ‘slapping contest’ in a smokey, seedy bunker. Two large men take turns slapping each other in the face. Suddenly, an impressive slap causes the drunken crowd to erupt. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

The host of a Mumbai sports show is interviewing the National Clubbing Champion. Two blindfolded men chase each other with clubs in front of a large crowd. They swing wildly at each other … but miss. Then one loses his bearings and starts pounding a gentleman in the crowd. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

Advertising Agency: Cliff Freeman and Partners, USA
Creative Director: Eric Silver
Copywriter: Dan Morales
Art Director: Rossana Bardales
Production Company: Partizan NY
Director: Traktor

Alternative Grand Prix – John West (Bear)

At a river, a man fights a bear for a salmon. Voiceover: John West endure the worst to bring you the best. Super: John West Red Salmon.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett UK
Creative Director: Mark Tutssel
Copywriter: Paul Silburn
Art Director: Paul Silburn
Production Company: Spectre UK
Director: Daniel Kleinman

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Grand Prix 2002 – Nike (Tag)

A young man is tagged in an elaborate game, involving the entire city. He races off to tag someone else, and they elude him to the very end.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, USA
Creative Director: Dan Wieden, Hal Curtis, Jim Riswold
Art Director: Monica Taylor, Andy Fackrell
Director: Frank Budgen

Alternative Grand Prix – Levis (Odyssey)

A man and a woman hurtle through a string of solid walls. They crash out of the building, land on a tree, and run up it into the night sky.

Advertising Agency: BBH, UK
Creative Director: Stephen Butler
Art Director: Gavin Lester
Production Company: Academy, UK
Director: Jonathan Glazer

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Grand Prix 2003 – IKEA (Lamp)

An old lamp is thrown out to make way for a new one from Ikea.

Advertising Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky, USA
Creative Director: Alex Bogusky, Paul Keister
Art Director: Mark Taylor, Steve Mapp
Copywriter: Ari Merkin
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Spike Jonze

Alternative Grand Prix – Honda (Cog)

Cog is a two-minute chain reaction using only parts from a Honda Accord. Each car part cleverly triggers off the next, showing the beauty and precision of the pieces, and the ingenuity of the engineers who built it, prompting the V/O to comment “Isn’t it nice when things just work?”.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy, London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth
Art Director: Matt Gooden
Copywriter: Ben Walker
Production Company: Partizan, London
Director: Antoine Bardou-Jacquet

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Grand Prix 2004 – Playstation 2 (Mountain)

Hundreds of thousands of people are forming a human mountain higher than any of the other buildings in the city. At it’s zenith a variety of people enjoy a moment of exhilaration before others scramble over them and take their place.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/London
Creative Director: Trevor Beattie
Art Director: Tony McTear
Copywriter: Paula Marcantonio, Tony McTear
Production Company: Gorgeous Enterprises, UK
Director: Frank Budgen

Alternative Grand Prix – Lynx 24-7 (Getting Dressed)

A man and woman wake up in bed. They start getting dressed. We soon discover that their clothes are scattered right across the city. The last shoe sits by two opposite-facing shopping trolleys in a supermarket. The couple met there only hours ago. The man was wearing Lynx 24/7 bodyspray.

Advertising Agency: BBH, UK
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Art Director: Nick Gill
Copywriter: Nick Gill
Production Company: Small Family Business, UK
Director: Ringan Ledwidge

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Grand Prix 2005 – Honda (Grrr)

Can hate be a good thing? Honda ‘Grrr’ sets out to prove just that. A tranquil world is invaded by flying, dirty old Diesel engines. However, the population get angry and even, using their hate for the better, destroying every last one. Finally, they herald the brand new Honda Diesel.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy, London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth, Chris O’reilly
Art Director: Sean Thompson, Michael Russoff, Richard Russell
Copywriter: Sean Thompson, Michael Russoff, Richard Russell
Production Company: Nexus Production, London
Director: Adam Foulkes, Alan Smith

Alternative Grand Prix – Adidas (Hello Tomorrow)

Adidas 1 is the first shoe with a computer. “Hello Tomorrow” demonstrates that with every step these magical shoes can create an entirely new world out of nothing. It is a story of rebirth and
taking your first steps – again.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/Chiat/Day, San Francisco
Creative Director: Lee Clow, Chuck McBride, Joe Kayser
Art Director: Joe Kayser
Copywriter: Chuck McBride
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Spike Jonze

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Grand Prix 2006 – Guinness (Noitulove)

Three young men at a bar drink Guinness. Suddenly the action pauses and the film starts to play in reverse. The men walk backwards out of the bar. As they walk they seamlessly go back down the evolutionary chain through hundreds, thousands, millions of years. Super: GUINNESS. Good things come to those who wait.

Advertising Agency: Abbott, Mead, Vickers, BBDO, UK
Creative Director: Paul Brazier
Art Director: Matt Doman
Copywriter: Ian Heartfield
Production Company: Kleinman Productions, London
Director: Danny Kleinman

Alternative Grand Prix – Sony (Balls)

Dropping 250,000 brightly coloured bouncy balls down the streets of San Francisco for real = colour like no other.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative Director: Richard Flintman
Art Director: Juan Cabral
Copywriter: Juan Cabral
Production Company: MJZ, London
Director: Nicolai Fuglsig

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Grand Prix 2007 – Dove (Evolution)

We created a film that exposed the manipulation of the female image in the media. The objective was to encourage discussion around the subject of real beauty and lead people to the campaignforrealbeauty website.”

Advertising Agency: Ogilvy & Mother Toronto
Creative Director: Janet Kestin, Nancy Vonk
Art Director: Tim Piper, Mike Kirkland
Copywriter: Tim Piper
Production Company: Reginald Pike, Toronto
Director: Yael Staav, Tim Piper

Alternative Grand Prix – Epuron (Power of Wind)

Wind has a strong nature. Better keep him busy…

Advertising Agency: Nordpol + Hamburg, Germany
Creative Director: Lars Ruehmann
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann, Joakim Reveman
Copywriter: Matthew Branning
Production Company: Paranoid Projects, USA
Director: The Vikings

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Grand Prix 2008 – Cadbury (Gorilla)/Microsoft (Halo 3 Campaign)

We hear ‘In the air tonight’ by Phil Collins as we realize we’re in front of a calm looking gorilla. ‘I’ve been waiting for this moment for all of my life…’ The ape stretches its neck like a heavyweight boxer would do before a fight. He’s sitting in front of a massive drum kit as the best drum fill of the history of rock is coming. The Gorilla knows this. He smashes the drums phenomenally – feeling every beat. The camera leaves the ape and his drum. United, the way they are meant to be.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative Director: Richard Flinthan, Juan Cabral
Art Director: Juan Cabral
Copywriter: Juan Cabral
Production Company: Blink, London
Director: Juan Cabral

On-line, the Halo 3 website served as a virtual museum, providing an interactive fly through of the entire John 117 monument and putting visitors right in the middle of the fight. They could also learn more about our enemies and hear first hand stories from the men who were there. For that we filmed interviews with surviving veterans of the battle who served with Master Chief. They talked about their experiences and spoke with reverence and awe about what it was like to serve with mankind’s greatest hero.

Advertising Agency: T.A.G. San Francisco/McCann Worldgroup
Creative Director: Geoff Edwars, Scott Duchon
Art Director: Ben Wolan
Copywriter: Rich Herrera
Production Company: Go Film, Hollywood/RSA Films Los Angeles
Director: Simon McQuoid, Rupert Sanders, Neil Blomkamp

Alternative Grand Prix – Nike (Next Level)

“Next Level” is new take on Football from Nike. Made to inspire football obsessed teens, the film is a first-person journey up the football ranks–from being discovered by Arsenal in a youth match to a life-defining moment playing for our national side. Along the way we experience success (finishing a cross from Cesc Fabregas) as well as frustration (getting burned by Ronaldinho). The film celebrates playing the game with purpose and passion. It shows what it takes to become a modern, brilliant fofotballer – to take your game to the next level.

Advertising Agency: 72 And Sunny, USA
Creative Director: Glen Cole, John Boiler, Bryan Rowles, Jason Norcross
Production Company: Anonymous Content, USA
Director: Guy Ritchie

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Grand Prix 2009 – Philips (Carousel)

Philips set out to own the idea of a cinematic viewing experience at home. From the start the strategy was to create a film that movie lovers would want to see.

The film is hosted within a site that, through interaction, educates the audience about the three main features of Philips televisions – Ambilight, Cinema 21:9 and Picture Quality – and ties these features to the act of film making. So, what would movie lovers want to see? We decided on a seamless tracking shot, one long take that a film loving audience could marvel at and be fascinated by. Within the ‘housing’ of a tracking shot we inserted behind the scenes glimpses where the experts could talk about their craft and the decisions they made whilst filming the shot. The DOP on lighting, the Director on the 21:9 format and VFX supervisor shows why picture quality is so important. To allow for more interaction, we decided that a frozen time film, shot using a state of the art motion control rig, would give the audience control upon interaction allowing them to literally move the camera back and forth frame by frame. This is done intuitively through a ‘grabbing hand’ cursor when the screen is moused over.

What makes this interaction really special is the interactive cinematic score. The score, composed by Michael Fakesch, was composed as a linear piece, but was then handed over to a flash music developer to carve up and distort as the user moved back and forth through time, frame by frame – all designed to pull the audience in and hold them there longer whilst they try to unravel the mystery of how the film was made.

The second main element of interaction is the way the audience is able to trigger the three behind-the-scenes educational scenes from the film’s timeline. When the user clicks on the timeline, they reveal films within the film. The timeline unfolds and expands, the post production disappears, each expert walks in and the rigging reappears revealing that all along the actors were simply holding their position whilst a state of the art motion rig captured them in frozen time. All this was designed to be as seamless as possible with maximum visual reward ensuring the audience clicked all three of the hotspots.

In addition to the interaction within the film, the ratio of the film itself could be changed at anytime through first person interaction. This simple, but effective comparison tool really did get across the spectacle of the new Philips 21:9 TV. The other elegantly simple piece of interaction is Ambilight on and off, in the words of the DOP – “you really miss it when it’s not there.”  A final point worth noting is the dynamic title sequence. Instead of a traditional loader, we crafted a title sequence correspond to the speed of the users internet connection. The slower the connection, the longer the sequence.

Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB Amsterdam
Creative Director: Michael Fakesch, Chris Baylis, Andrew Ferguson
Art Director: Mariota Essery, Maximilliano Chanan
Copywriter: Carla Madden
Production Company: Stink Digital, London
Director: Adam Berg

Alternative Grand Prix – T-Mobile (Dance)

On 15th January at 11am, a single commuter started dancing in the middle of a train station. The dance grew as more dancers joined in, until there were over 300 people perfectly choreographed. The excitement caused hundred’s of genuine unsuspecting members of the public to join in and share the moment.

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, London
Creative Director: Paul Silburn, Kate Stanners
Art Director: Rick Dodds
Copywriter: Stephen Howell
Production Company: Partizan, London
Director: Michael Gracey

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Grand Prix 2010 – Old Spice (The Men Your Man Could Smell Like)

This TV commercial was created to appeal to men as well as women, showing them both how great a man can smell when they use Old Spice Body Wash.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Creative Director: Mark Fitzloff, Susan Hoffman
Art Director: Craig Allen, Eric Kallman
Copywriter: Craig Allen, Eric Kallmacanal
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Tom Kuntz

Alternative Grand Prix – Canal + (Closet)

Canal+ launched its new ‘Original Creativity’ campaign in September 2009. The objective highlight to Canal+’s showcase of original programming, consisting of series, documentaries and fictions, created exclusively by and for Canal+, scripted by prestigious writers such as Olivier Marchal and Jean- Hugues Anglade. To launch this new campaign, we produced THE CLOSET. The film unites quality, humour, originality and a touch of impertinence inherent to the brand’s communications: ‘Never underestimate the power of a great story”

Advertising Agency: BETC EURO RSCG, Paris
Creative Director: Stephane Xiberras
Art Director: Eric Astorgue
Copywriter: Jean Christophe Royer
Production Soixan7e Quin5e, Paris
Director: Matthijs van Heijningen

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Grand Prix 2011 – Nike (Write the Future)

Every four years, the keys to football heaven are dangled in front of the international elite. One goal, one pass, one game saving tackle can be the difference between fame and forgotten. What happens on the pitch in that split second has a ripple effect that goes beyond the match and the tournament.
‘Write the Future’ was a messaging platform that allowed Nike to show how football creates this ripple effect. It allowed us to give a glimpse into the future to see what the players were really playing for, in their own lives and the lives of those that follow them. Our goal was to weave the brand into the conversations around this major tournament in a way that celebrated the participating teams and athletes and engaged football fans around the world.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Amsterdam
Creative Director: Jeff Kling, Mark Bernath, Eric Quennoy
Art Director: Stuart Harkness, Freddie Powell
Copywriter: Stuart Harkness, Freddie Powell
Production Company: Independent Films, London
Director: Alejandro Gonzales Inarritu

Alternative Grand Prix – Volkswagen (The Force)/Crysler (Born of Fire)

For the all-new 2012 Passat , Volkswagen brings Star Wars™ to one of TV’s most talked about events. Accompanied by John Williams’ iconic “The Imperial March,” the spot features the most infamous villain in the galaxy, a pint-sized Darth Vader who uses the Force when he discovers the all-new 2012 Passat in the driveway. The two iconic brands leverage humor and the unforgettable Star Wars score to create an emotional spot and make Super Bowl ad history.

Advertising Agency: Deutsch, Los Angeles
Creative Director: Eric Springer, Michael Kadin
Art Director: Ryan Mclaughlin, Craig Melchiano
Copywriter: David Povill
Production Park Pictures, Santa Monica
Director: Lance Acord

Of the big three American car companies, Chrysler was in the most danger of failing. Had there not been a last-minute vote of confidence from the U.S. Government, they would not exist. This was public knowledge, debated throughout the country—should we have loaned Chrysler the money?  When it came time to introduce a new product, we had a car to sell and also had to win back America’s confidence. To do this, we took the unlikely position of embracing Chrysler’s Detroit heritage when every other American car company was distancing themselves from the city.  We created a 2-minute homage to Detroit, a city primed for a comeback, and ran the spot only once, on Super Bowl Sunday.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy Portland
Creative Director: Mark Fitzloff, Susan Hoffman, Aaron Allen
Art Director: Jim Lasser
Copywriter: Mark Fitzloff, Joe Staples, Kevin Jones, Greg Rutter, Dan Kroeger
Production: Serial Pictures, Culver City
Director: Samuel Bayer


Creatives in Love (Valentine’s Day in advertising)

1 – Axe Deodorant

2 – Dom Francisco Reastaurant

3 – Tide

4 – Volkswagen New Beatle

5 – Volkswagen

6 – Wonderbra

7 – McDonalds

8 – Kolner Zoo

9 – Pasta Adria

10 – Heineken

11 – Miller Beer

12 – Yemeksepeti.com (food delivery)

13 – Straps Lingerie Store

14 – British Airways

15 – Tampax

16 – Puma

17 – NW Nutrient Water

18 – Sexy Avenue.com

19 – Levi’s

20 – New Scientist

21 – Nissan Micra

22 – Playstation

23 – After Eden Lingerie

24 – Camper

25 – Predector (Pregnant Test)

26 – Is Kultur Bookstores

27 – Renault

28 – Parmalat Yogurbelt 0% fat

29 – Toyota

30 – Swatch

31 – SpotG Sexy Shop

32 – Canal+

33 – BMW Motorrad

34 – HOG Singapore Valentine Ride

35 – Brave Heart Fund – Children Heart Center

36 – Brasil Telecom

37 – Valentine’s and Coronary Patient Day

38 – Kiss Radio 102.1 fm

39 – Barrashopping – Shopping Mall

40 – DeBeers

41 – DIM Underwear

42 – Chevrolet

43 – Sedal Shampoo

44 – Bavaria Beer

45 – Nescafè

46 – Motorola

47 – Ducati

48 – Alfa Romeo

49 – Nakshatra Diamond

50 – Absolut Vodka

51 – Oreo

52 – Conrad Treasury Casinò

53 – McCann Helthcare

54 – Orkoss Restaurant

55 – La Benedicta Restaurant

56 – Wilkinson

57 – Seat

58 – Durex

59 – Wurst

60 – Avon

61 – Wellington Zoo

 


Levi’s – Creek

Judged even against the impressive stable of Levis commercials dating back to the early 80s, “Creek” is a true thoroughbred.
Ever since Bartle Bogle Hegarty created launderette, its first breakthrough spot for the brand, successive films have transformed the image of Levis as old-fashioned and uncool and made it market leader, creating huge amounts of PR along the way.Creek took the brand back to its roots in 1850s America. Shot in moody black and white, the commercial features what appears to be an Amish family picnicking in a remote spot.
The two daughters drift of to a nearby creek where they see a pair of jeans on a rock while their apparently naked owner bathes. As the soundtrack music reaches a crescendo the man emerges from the water to reveal that he is wearing a pair of jeans and shrinking them to fit. The owner of the jeans turns out to be a scruffy old man.

Agency: BBH, London

Writer: Nick Worthington
Art director: John Gorse
Directors: Vaughan & Anthea
Production company: Lewin & Watson


Levi’s – Laundrette

A classic from the BBH stable, this ad announces the launch of the first Levi’s stonewashed jeans. It’s 1950s small town USA, a GI stands watching the girls. Behind him a man walks into a launderette carrying a bag of small rocks which he pours into one of the machines. He then proceeds to remove his clothes down to his boxers and socks, and put them in the machine. A thoroughly honed physique is admired by all as he takes his seat against the wall. Levi’s: Now available stonewashed

Levi’s looked a most unpromising account when it arrived at the fledgling Bartle Bogle Hegarty in 1982.
The brand was perceived as old fashioned and, at a time of much anti-American feeling, uncool.
The launderette commercial, promoting Levi’s classic 501s, was the breakthrough.
John Hegarty and the writer Barbara Nokes recreated an image of 50s Americana that presented 501s as alternative to punk’s scruffiness.The spot wasn’t only beautifully shot but had humour and sex appeal in the form of teen idol Nick Kamen.
It was also an early example of successful integrated marketing. Marvin Gaye’s I Heard It Through The Grapevine soundtrack was re-released with the Levi’s logo on the record sleeve and shot into the charts.
As for Levi’s sales, they had soared by 800 per cent within a year of the 501s re-launch.

Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty (BBH)

Creative: John Hegarty; Greg Mills; Barbara Nokes
Director: Roger Lyons
Production: Mike Dufficy & Partners
Director of Photography: Richard Greatrex
Editor: Ian Weil
Music: Karl Jenkins, Mike Ratledge