Happy New Year Ads

Happy New Year from BRUSSELS AIRLINES

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Happy New Year from DISCO SUPERMARKETS

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Happy New Year from DURACELL

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Happy New Year from DUREX

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Happy New Year from TMB (Metro de Barcelona)

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Happy New Year from ALKA SELTZER

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Happy New Year from AUDI

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Happy New Year from AXE

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Happy New Year from BARILLA

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Happy New Year from YES Tablet

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Happy New Year from MIKADO

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Happy New Year from HONDA

 

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Happy New Year from BMW

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Happy New Year from O.B.

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TBWA/Berlin for adidas – A Giant Case History

IMPOSSIBLE GOALKEEPER

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Just before the start of the UEFA Euro 2008 football tournament, adidas turned one of Vienna’s best-known landmarks, the Prater ferris wheel, into a huge image of the Czech national goalkeeper, Petr Cech. At a whooping 53m tall, this gigantic installation was visible far beyond the Prater entertainment park and the nearby public viewing sites. In the installation, Cech had eight arms that constantly rotated with the ferries wheel. The erection of the metal construction started on May 13 and was finished just before the launch of the tournament on the night of June 5, 2008. This advertising landmark also hosted the official adidas press conference prior to the tournament.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt
Creative: Marco Bezerra, Emiliano Treierveiler

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OLIVER KAHN BRIDGE

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If you travelled to Munich for the first game of the FIFA World Cup in 2006, chances are you saw this huge installation, which shows an enormous Oliver Kahn (the then German national team goalkeeper) diving across the motorway. The 65-m installation managed to bypass the law forbidding advertising on the German Autobahn, and was the only piece of advertising adidas conducted in Germany during the tournament. Over 4 millions people commuted through the installation and many more saw it in the press. In its first week the Oliver Kahn bridge was displayed on double-page spreads in leading magazines including Focus, Stern, Autobild and Fortune. It was also picked up by newspapers including the New York Times and the Financial Times.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Kurt-Georg Dieckert
Creative: Helge Bloch, Boris Schwiedrzik

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IMPOSSIBLE HUDDLE

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For the duration of the UEFA EURO 2008 football tournament, TBWA/Berlin transformed the main hall of Zurich’s Central Station into a large-scale celebration of team spirit. Eleven European football players (all sponsored by adidas, naturally) formed the Impossible huddle. The bodies of the footballers represented were 3D-scanned as were their faces and hairstyles, to ensure that the sculptures were faithful to the originals. It took 40 trucks to move the installation components from the production sites in southern Germany to Switzerland, where they were assembled in the station.

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The Swiss rail authority reported that an estimate 13 million people passed through the station during the three-week period the sculptural installation was in site, and at 17m high and approximately 30m wide, it was impossible to miss. Add to this the fact that various news titles such as the Financial Times, Die Welt, Gazzetta dello Sport, Le Parisien and the BBC featured the campaign on their front pages or online editions, plus the fact that it was picked up by dozens of blog worldwide.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Markus Ewertz
Creative: Erik Gonan, Hendrik Scweder

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FOOTBALL FRESCO

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During the German-hosted 2006 FIFA World Cup, adidas wanted to get across the message that they cooperate with the best football players on the planet. Rather than run a traditional poster campaign, the creatives at TBWA/Berlin decided it would be far more impressive to create a huge Renaissance-style fresco on the ceiling of the main lobby of Cologne Central Station. Within minutes of the fresco’s unveiling, it was featured on national German Television and press covered it throughout the World Cup. More than 8.5 million people saw the frersco in the flesh during the course of the tournament.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Kurt-Georg Dieckert
Creative: Helge Bloch, Boris Schwiedrzik


Diesel – Happy Apocalypse

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This new animated spot for Diesel through Vice and Blinkink London and directing team Jonny & Will is a rather risque call to arms…According to the ancient Mayan calendar, December 21st 2012 marks the day the Earth will be destroyed and all human life will cease to exist forevermore. So, if the rumour is true and 21-12-2012 really is the day it all ends, surely there’s only one thing to do?


Haddon Sundblom for Coca-Cola – The Man Who Painted Christmas

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Though he was not the first artist to create an image of Santa Claus for Coca-Cola advertising, Haddon Sundblom’s version became the standard for other Santa renditions and is the most-enduring and widespread depiction of the holiday icon to this day. Coca-Cola’s Santa artworks would change the world’s perception of the North Pole’s most-famous resident forever and would be adopted by people around the world as the popular image of Santa.

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In the 1920s, The Coca-Cola Company began to promote soft drink consumption for the winter holidays in U.S. magazines. The first Santa ads for Coke used a strict-looking Claus. In 1930, a Coca-Cola advertised with a painting by Fred Mizen, showing a department store Santa impersonator drinking a bottle of Coke amid a crowd of shoppers and their children.
Not long after, a magical transformation took place. Archie Lee, then the agency advertising executive for The Coca-Cola Company, wanted the next campaign to show a wholesome Santa as both realistic and symbolic. In 1931, the Company commissioned Haddon Sundblom, a Michigan-born illustrator and already a creative giant in the industry, to develop advertising images using Santa Claus. Sundblom envisioned this merry gentleman as an opposite of the meager look of department store Santa imitators from early 20th century America.

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Sundblom turned to Clement Moore’s classic poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” (better known as “’Twas the Night Before Christmas”) for inspiration:

His eyes — how they twinkled! His dimples: how merry,
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry;
His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow

The ode’s description of the jolly old elf inspired Sundblom to create an image of Santa that was friendly, warm and human, a big change from the sometimes-harsh portrayals of Santa up to that time. He painted a perfectly lovable patron saint of the season, with a white beard flowing over a long red coat generously outlined with fur, an enormous brass buckle fastening a broad leather belt, and large, floppy boots.

Sundblom’s Santa was very different from the other Santa artworks: he radiated warmth, reminded people of their favorite grandfather, a friendly man who lived life to the fullest, loved children, enjoyed a little honest mischief, and feasted on snacks left out for him each Christmas Eve . Coca-Cola’s Christmas campaign featuring this captivating Santa ran year after year.

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As distribution of Coca-Cola and its ads spread farther around the world, Sundblom’s Santa Claus became more memorable each season, in more and more countries. The character became so likable, The Coca-Cola Company and Haddon Sundblom struck a partnership that would last for decades. Over a span of 33 years, Haddon Sundblom painted imaginative versions of the “Coca-Cola Santa Claus” for for Coke advertising, retail displays and posters.

Sundblom initially modeled Santa’s smiling face after the cheerful looks of a friend, retired salesman Lou Prentiss. “He embodied all the features and spirit of Santa Claus,” Sundblom said. “The wrinkles in his face were happy wrinkles.” After Prentiss passed away, the Swedish-American Sundblom used his own face as the ongoing reference for painting the now-enduring, modern image of Santa Claus.

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In 1951, Sundblom captured the Coca-Cola Santa “making his list and checking it twice.” However, the ads did not acknowledge that bad children existed and showed pages of good boys and girls only. Mischievous and magical, the Coca-Cola Santa was not above raiding the refrigerator during his annual rounds, stealing a playful moment with excited children and pets, or pausing to enjoy a Coca-Cola during stops on his one-night, worldwide trek. When air adventures became popular, Santa also could be caught playing with a toy helicopter around the tree.

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Haddon Sundblom passed away in 1976, but The Coca-Cola Company continues to use a variety of his timeless depictions of Saint Nicholas in holiday advertising, packaging and other promotional activities. The classic Coca-Cola Santa images created by Sundblom are as ubiquitous today as the character they represent and have become universally accepted as the personification of the patron saint of both children and Christmas.

As Joanna Berry, Lecturer in Marketing at Newcastle University Business School, explains: “Whilst Sundblom didn’t invent Santa as the jolly, white haired rotund old man we all now expect, he certainly did more than anyone to imprint that image onto our minds in relation to Coca-Cola in one of the most enduring brand images ever to have been created.”

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A tribute to Haddon Sundblom from “Coke Side of Life” Campaign

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Monopoly in advertising

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Monopoly – New York/London/Madrid

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Advertising Agency: DDB Spain
Year: 2005

 

Monopoly – “Own it all” Campaign

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Advertising Agency: JWT Frankfurt
Year: 2009

 

Monopoly – A Real Game

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Advertising Agency: DDB Madrid
Year: 2008

 

Monopoly – Mansion/Jail

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Advertising Agency: Grey Chile
Year: 2007

 

Monopoly – Be careful where you land

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Advertising Agency: TBWA Singapore
Year: 2007

 

Monopoly – Building Branding

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Advertising Agency: DDB Lisboa
Year: 2006

 

Monopoly – Barcelona Edition/New York Edition

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Advertising Agency: DDB Madrid
Year: 2006

 

Monopoly – Before/After Campaign

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Advertising Agency: Grey Chile
Year: 2006

 

Monopoly – The Here & Now Edition

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Advertising Agency: Grey New York
Year: 2009

 

Monopoly – “Be a Player” Campaign

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Student project by Alexandra George and Candice Countryman. 
Year: 2011

 

Monopoly – Ambient

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Student project by Miami Ad School, Madrid
Year: 2010


McCann Australia for Metro Trains Melbourne – Is “Dumb Ways To Die” the new “Chipotle”?

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“Dumb Ways to Die”, is an integrated advertising campaign designed to curb the number of train-related deaths in Victoria. The campaign is centred around a three-minute animated music video, highlighting the many dumb ways there are to die, with being hit by a train – a very preventable death – among them. The video and iTunes single are accessible online at DumbWaysToDie.com, with animated gifs being released on Tumblr, on radio, in posters on small and large space outdoor and throughout the Metro Trains network, with the lyrics to the song on the art work.

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The Idea: Safety PSAs are gloomy and tedious and largely ignored by young people hardwired to resist them—except when they’re irresistibly fun and impossible not to share with friends. McCann Australia managed just such an evolution of the genre with “Dumb Ways to Die” its animated train-safety spot for the Melbourne Metro. The three-minute music video shows adorable blobs making the stupidest decisions ever—messing with animals, sticking forks in toasters, eating superglue, etc.—leading to all sorts of gruesome, fatal accidents. The dumbest way to die, the ad suggests at the end, is by being careless around trains. “The idea for a song started from a very simple premise: What if we disguised a worthy safety message inside something that didn’t feel at all like a safety message?” said McCann executive creative director John Mescall. “So we thought about what the complete opposite of a serious safety message would be and came to the conclusion it was an insanely happy and cute song.” With more than 30 million YouTube views, it seems happy, cute and grisly was the way to go.

The Song: The song begins, “Set fire to your hair/Poke a stick at a grizzly bear/Eat medicine that’s out of date/Use your private parts as piranha bait,” before the chorus repeats the two lines, “Dumb ways to die/So many dumb ways to die.” Mescall wrote most of the lyrics in one night at the agency. “It then took a few weeks of finessing,” he said, “getting rid of a few lines that weren’t funny enough and replacing them with new ones.” The line “Sell both your kidneys on the Internet” was a late inclusion. “I’m glad it’s there. It’s my favorite,” he said.

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Australian musician Ollie McGill from the band The Cat Empire wrote the music. “We basically gave him the lyrics and told him to set it to the catchiest nonadvertising type music he could,” said Mescall. McGill delivered something almost unbearably catchy. “The melody is easy to remember and sing along to, the lyrics are fun, bite-sized chunks of naughtiness, and the vocals have just the right amount of knowing innocence,” Mescall said. “It’s a song that you want to hate for living in your head, but you can’t bring yourself to hate it because it’s also so bloody likable.” The singer is Emily Lubitz of another Australian band, Tinpan Orange. (The song is credited to Tangerine Kitty, which is a mashup of the two band names.) “Emily brought a great combination of innocence, playfulness and vocal integrity,” Mescall said. “She brings a level of vocal quality you don’t normally get on a video about cartoon death.”

The Art Direction: Australian designer Julian Frost did the animation. “We gave him the most open brief we could: Just make it really funny and really awesome and do it to please yourself,” said Mescall. The visual reference points ranged from Edward Gorey’s The Gashlycrumb Tinies to Monty Python’s “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” (which showed men singing while being crucified) to “any number of hokey indie music-video flash mobs you see on YouTube,” said Mescall.

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“Julian was keen to contrast the extreme situations described in the lyrics with the simplest animation possible. Otherwise it would become just too much.” After the spot blew up online, Frost wrote on his website: “Well, the Internet likes dead things waaay more than I expected. Hooray, my childish sense of humor pays off at last.”

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The spot lives online, in short bursts on music TV, and may reach cinemas. The campaign is also running in radio, print and outdoor. The song is on iTunes, where it reached the top 10. The agency is also producing a book as well as a smartphone game that should be ready by Christmas.

Advertising Agency: McCann, Melbourne
Executive Creative Director: John Mescall
Creative Team: John Mescall, Pat Baron
Animation: Julian Frost
Digital Team: Huey Groves, Christian Stocker
Year: 2012


Leo Burnett for Think!/Road Safety Campaign – Man Trapped in Pint Glass

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Agency Leo Burnett did some research and found that anti-drink-driving advertising based around crashing and injury was no longer likely to effect the target demographic of young male drivers who don’t believe that driving after drinking a couple of beers is dangerous. The agency found that low-consumption male drink-drivers were more likely to be deterred by personal consequences of a drink-driving conviction.

The idea of this campaign was to play against the seasonal jollity of the Christmas period and to dramatize the experience of isolation, regret and stigmatization brought about by a drink-driving conviction. In December 2007 a real-life convicted drink-driver agreed to be placed inside a specially constructed upturned pint glass. He was thus trapped by his seemingly innocuous decision to get behind the wheel after having one pint too many. The subject was interviewed by national press and broadcast media in Paddington Station as he explained how being convicted of a drink-driving offence had ruined his life: he had lost his job, his girlfriend, his car and a lot of money. An actor then took over the role of the drink-driver up and down the country at locations specially chosen for their proximity to public car parks and areas with a high concentration of pubs and bars (particulary those used by football fans).

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The campaign is thought to have contributed to a drop of 20% in breath test failures during the pre-Christmas period of 2007.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett London
Creative Directors: Tony Malcom, Guy Moore
Creatives: Phillip Deacon, Bertie Scrase
Year: 2007