Scholz & Friends for Fresh’N’Friends – Fruit Figures

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All adults know: healthy eating is important. The organic supermarket chain Fresh`N´Friends benefits from that situation. There is just one small problem: kids hate healthy food but they love sweets. Actually, that´s even a big problem. In Germany every fifth child is overweight. “Instead of calling attention to that problem with a traditional ad campaign we chose to solve the problem.”

The solution was a new product: fruit figures. “To make fruits as appealing as sweets for kids we designed fruit arrangements that suit children. Boring fruits were designed in shape of teddy bears, kittens, flowers – all the things kids love.” Just like ordinary fruit salads the fruit figures were sealed, put in a tray and sold in Fresh´N´Friends stores. 

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Additionally, they were promoted with advertising specifically targeted at parents and their kids – direct mailings, email newsletters and posters. In order to involve the kids directly in the campaign a contest was started. We placed cut-out sheets in every package. So the kids could make their own fruit figures by hand. They also could design them digitally on the Fresh`N´Friends website. All ideas were published and judged online. The figure with the most votes was added to the product range. Over 3,500 designs from children were submitted. The rabbit figure of five-year-old Dario got the most votes and was therefore added to the product range.

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Advertising Agency: Scholz & Friends, Berlin, Germany
Creative Director: Martin Pross, Matthias Spaetgens, Wolf Schneider, Mathias Rebmann, Florian Schwalme
Art Director: Alexander Doepel, Sandra Krebs, Bjoern Kernspeckt, René Gebhardt, Loic Sattler, Jinhi Kim
Photographer: Attila Hartwig
Graphics: Peter Schoenherr, Simon Rossow
Year: 2012

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Grey New York for Canon Eos – What would you do to get the perfect shot?

The world is filled with beautiful moments worth capturing. You just have to see them. Also, buy a Canon Rebel T4i camera and carry it with you all the time. That way, whenever inspiration strikes, you’ll be ready to snap a photo you can save forever. Also, Canon will sell more Canon Rebels.

“Inspired” is a new ad for the brand from Grey in New York features a montage of adventurous photographers braving environmental hazards to get that special shot. The spot does a particularly nice job of portraying the product users as the heroes of the story: their antics are by varying degrees entertaining (trying to outrun a charging giraffe, staring down an irate fishmonger) and stupid-dangerous (climbing to the edge of an icy roof to get a better angle on the kid making snow angels in an empty pool). The resulting pictures are all marvelous, and so is the filming of the spot itself, showing all the right attention to detail—e.g., the birthday girl’s sideway glance when her mom nonchalantly sweeps a bowl off the table to get it out of the frame.

The director, Nicolai Fuglsig, also shot Fallon’s Balls spot. He appears to have an affinity for steep roads and the effects of gravity on unusual objects—in that case innumerable bouncy balls, and in this case a flaming tire. The soundtrack is Rachel Fannan of the California rock group Only You singing a charmingly understated version of the easily mawkish classic “Beautiful Dreamer,” and it’s pretty much perfect for the spot. Canon or someone should probably post or sell the whole song somewhere obvious soon. People are going to want to hear it.

Figuring out how exactly the lofty tagline, “Long live imagination,” ties into an ad about making concrete records of inspiring moments may take a few steps of abstraction. But in the end, it does make sense, and the conceit, with all its overtones of creativity and immortality, is pretty much dead-on for an ad aimed at people who want to be artists.
Advertising Agency: Grey, New York
Chief Creative Officer: Tor Myhren
Executive Creative Directors: Ari Halper, Steve Krauss
Creative Directors: Stu Mair, Dave Cuccinello
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Nicolai Fuglsig
Year: 2012


25 Advertising Ideas for 25 November: International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women

01 – Amnesty International

02 – BaF (Bundesverband autonomer Frauennotrufe)

03 – United Colors of Benetton

04 – Domestic Violence Vigilance (USA)

05 – Aware Helpline Singapore

06 – APAV (Victim Suport)

07 – Refuge.org.uk

 

08 – APAV (Victim Support)

 

 

09 – Florencia (Service for abused women)

 

10 – Citizens Against Spouse Abuse

11 – Amnesty International

12 – Amnesty International

13 – Women’s Aid Organisation

14 – The Youth, Women, Children and Family Chamber (Panama)

15 – Amnesty International

 16 – Amnesty International

17 – Amnesty International

18 – NO (Combat Violence Against Women Helpline)

 19 – http://www.terres-des-femmes.ch

20 –  Associazione Donne Insieme contro la Violenza

21 – Ni Puter Ni Soumises

22 – Mar’A (Against Domestic Violence)

23 – Amnesty International

 

24 – Solidaritè Femmes

25 – NSW (Women’s Refuge Movement)


Levi’s 501 – The story behind Launderette

The opening bars of Marvin Gaye’s hit I Heard It Through The Grapevine are among the most evocative in television advertising history. For a whole generation, at least, those first few moody seconds only bring one image to mind – that of model Nick Kamen walking into a launderette. The ad might not have been set in the eighties (more likely a mythical fifties), but for many those first few seconds can evoke memories of an entire decade. But Nick Kamen (who only got the part on condition he lost weight) wasn’t the first to get his kit off in a launderette. An early Hamlet ad showed a bowler-hatted, be-suited gent undressing in front of a group of women and sticking his clothes, and even his hat, in a washing machine. Sadly, no one remembers the actor’s name. And, as far as we know, he never had a hit single written for him by Madonna…

Kamen’s “Lauderette” was shown for the first time on Boxing Day 1985. Thought up by John Hegarty and Barbara Noakes of BBH, the ad campaign was designed to try and save Levi’s flagging fortunes; the company was under attack from all sorts of other fashionable brands. In short, Levi’s (which had been going since the 1850s) were becoming the sort of jeans worn by people’s dads. And not even trendy dads – it was middle-aged “fuddy duddies” wearing “polyester Levi’s Action Slacks”. Research showed that the intended target audience for Levi’s 501 (15 to 19 year olds) saw the United States of the fifties and sixties as cool time and place in history: James Dean, Elvis Presley and Sam Cooke all belonged to this mythical, wondrous world. Unless the ad agencies came up with something new, the alternative was going with the American campaign for 501, which was all about how well the jeans fitted in the United States of Ronald Reagan. The image seemed the opposite of MTV and European chic.

So, director Roger Lyons was given the go-ahead to film an ad that showed drop dead gorgeous model Nick Kamen stripping down to his boxer shorts, while flustered women and bemused elders looked on, and then sitting and waiting while his jeans were in the wash. All this and Marvin Gaye thrown in too. (Except it wasn’t actually Marvin Gaye but a newly recorded “session” version of the song, though the original was later re-released off the back of the ad and entered the charts all over again…). “Grapevine” was the first of four Levi’s-related songs to all make the Top Ten, a feat that made advertisers realise that choosing the right music was of paramount importance because it really could help push a product on TV. They call it “Integrated Marketing”, and it meant a single in the chart and an ad on the box simultaneously, as well as the 501 logo alongside the artist’s name on the record sleeve in every record shop in Britain and USA.

Kate Thornton, a famous English journalist, was a schoolgirl at the time and remembers the effect that Kamen’s striptease had on her: “I remember that the ad was running at a cinema before a movie, and I hadn’t seen it on the tely at that point. So I went to the cinema just to see the ad…” she says. “The commercial made those jeans sexy at a time when Levi’s were struggling to make their product appealing to women of my age, and really that’s where the big spenders come from. Suddenly those jeans became a must-heve item! I only wanted them because Nick Kamen wore them and took them off…”

Thornton wasn’t the only teenager to feel that away. Consumers wrote in to Levi’s in their thousands asking for picture of Kamen. Meanwhile, sales of 501 shot up by an incredible 800% in the wake of the ad, which eventually had to be taken off the air because the Company couldn’t produce enough jeans to meet the new demand… By 1987 sales of Levi’s jeans were reported to be 20 times what they had been just three years earlier. The commercial also boosted sales of boxer shorts to a record high, though the ad agency only put Kamen in a pair of boxers because they weren’t allowed to show their hero in a pair of jockeys. And it wasn’t just teenage girl buying the jeans: boys were impressed by what Kamen could do. “The ad said: wear Levi’s jeans and you’ll be a rebel without a cause!” says psychologist Dr David Lewis. “You’ll be able to alienate older people (who young people despite anyway) and you can be cool…”

Inevitably, Nick Kamen was suddenly flavour of the month. Madonna wrote a song for him called “Each Time You Break My Heart” which made it into Top Ten. Kamen was soon a fully-fledged pop star, but his new career was short lived. Subsequent singles failed and Kamen moved to Los Angeles where he was to live for a time with British television presenter  Amanda de Cadenet. “There wasn’t life for Nick Kamen after Levi’s because he broke the rule…he talked!” says Thornton. “We just liked looking at him. It was as simple as that. He was a model and he just had these smouldering beautiful looks… but fundamentally he was to be looked at and lusted over, and never to be taken seriously…”. Nick Kamen turned a new Levi’s ad into a much-hyped media event and ended up eventually being replaced in 1999 by a fluffy yellow pupped called Flat Eric…

(Mark Robinson, The Sunday Times)

Advertising Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty 
Creative: John Hegarty, Greg Mills, Barbara Nokes
Director: Roger Lyons
Production: Mike Dufficy & Partners
Director of Photography: Richard Greatrex
Editor: Ian Weil
Music: Karl Jenkins, Mike Ratledge
Year: 1985


Air France/Music in the Sky – The Sky Has Something to Say

Air France Music is known and renowned for its exclusive musical selections. As suitable for an airline company, they are now inviting music lovers to turn their heads towards the sky with the new iPhone application “Music in the Sky”, designed by its agency BETC.

The principle is both poetic and fun: exclusive tunes are hidden in the clouds and all you have to do is catch them by lifting your iPhone, which automatically adds them to your playlist. Anyone with an iPhone can use the app, but travelling passengers will also have the privilege of discovering new tracks depending on where they are in the world: from Paris to Tokyo to Buenos Aires, the sky will hide its own music.

For the first time, thanks to the application, Air France Music fans will be able to listen to the “on air” selections played on board the planes also on terra firma. To celebrate the launch, unreleased tracks from François & the Atlas Mountains, Eugene McGuinness, Villagers, Melody’s Echo Chamber and Tomorrow’s World will be revealed. Finally, throughout the year, Air France Music will organise competitions in the app with the chance to win unreleased tracks, concert tickets or even plane tickets. The Air France Music application can be downloaded free in the Apple Store.

Advertising Agency: BETC
Creative Director: Florence Bellisson
Art Director: Sebastien Partika, Esteban Lebour, Alexandre Saad
Copywriter: Edouard olhagaray, Guillaume Rebbot
Web Designer: Bernard Quarante
Year: 2012


Microsoft Xbox/Halo3 – The Believe Campaign

 “A hero is more than a person, a hero is a belief. A belief that, against impossible odds, the world can be saved—and that the world is still worth saving. Heroes inspire that belief in us. They renew our faith and give us that most precious of all gifts—hope. The world  needs heroes. That’s why, when a true hero arrives, the world will honor him.— Xbox.com introduction of “Believe”.

In a bid to reach new audience for Halo franchise for the release of Halo 3, a futuristic human versus aliens science fiction videogame, McCann and T.A.G. in San Francisco came up with this complex integrated campaign that utilizes both film and online advertising. They created a large diorama that documented a historic battle, which was filmed for tv and cinema spots. An interactive flythrough tour of the diorama was then also placed online. It was all intended to present Halo as a story with real emotion. “Our objective was to use every medium we could to communicate the simple idea that Master Chief (the hero of the game) is a true hero to all humankind” says John Patroulis, creative Director at T.A.G.

“The goal was to make this the biggest title lunch in Xbox history” Patroulis continues. “And we went about it by executing a global campaign that used absolutely no game footage, starred either plastic figures or old men in its films, used classic music as its soundtrack, and almost never showed Master Chief”

“The ability to really move people is limited in a 30- or even 60-second TV spot, but the chance of something that’s more interactive or longer format…that’s the same feeling you get as after you’ve gone through a story or an experience and that’s what moves people... – Taylor Smith, Global Communications Director, Xbox

Halo 3 became the fastest pre-selling game in history and made 170 million in sales on its first day, the biggest launch in entertainment history.

Halo 3 – Believe

Halo3 Short Film 1 – Enemy Weapon

Halo3 Short Film 2 – Museum

Halo3 Short Film 3 – Hunted

Halo3  Short Film 4 – Gravesite

Halo3 Documentary – The John 117 Monument


BBC – Attenborough’s Wonderful World

One year ago, following the final episode of the Attenborough-narrated cold-climes series Frozen Planet, the BBC aired a two-minute trailer subtly celebrating the 60-odd years that the iconic TV personality has spent working on non-fiction programming for the network. Visually, the spot, from ad agency RKCR/Y&R, doesn’t deviate far from the staple shots of most natural science shows. Brightly colored birds, time lapses of blooming flowers, panoramas of majestic terrain, and pensive baboons all make their obligatory appearances. How can you not love this? It’s surprising and clever, yet also dignified. The only words in it are from the song ” What a Wonderful World” written by Bob Thiele and George David Weiss, and of course made famous by Louie Armstrong. This works so well because Attenborough speaks the lyrics—pleasant platitudes that we’ve almost stopped noticing, as the song has become audio wallpaper—in his signature cadence of wonder and delight. This renews our appreciation both of the song, and the power of Attenborough’s delivery. And of course, it’s all done to support stunning footage of nature, nicely edited with subtle sound effects to match the pictures. More than the sum of its parts. “It’s a wonderful world, watch it with us,” reads the BBC trailer’s tagline. Fantastic.

Advertising Agency: RKCR/Y&R, UK
Executive Creative Director: Mark Roalfe
Creatives: Ted Heath, Paul Angus