Wrangler/We Are Animals Campaign – The story behind the animals

In 2008, clothes company Wrangler put out a pitch to advertising agencies asking for help to reinvigorate the brand within the European youth market. It faced a specific image problem. “The problem was that Wrangler is an American brand, 125 years old, associated with middle America…” explains Fred Raillard of Parisian agency Fred & Farid. “So the perception of Wrangler was very much linked to the cowboy… But the cowboys in Europe was negative, because the cowboy means old, white America. It’s Marlboro, it’s John Wayne, it’s the people behind the indian genocide. It’s George Bush, who was hated in Europe”.

Despite this, Fred & Farid, which won the pitch, felt it was important not to stray too far away from the brand’s root in its new advertising. “You cannot start from scratch with the communication of a brand thai is 125 years old” continues Fred. “You cannot. Especially as in America the communication about the cowboy was to carry on… So we tried to extract the values of the rodeo  – the wildness, being on an animal, roughness. Also, the positive aspects of cowboys – environment, nature, living with animals. Living in sinch with nature, having courage. We tried to extract some values that would connect with young people in Europe. The we thought: maybe we could just move from the cowboy to the animal… To the horse, in fact…”

This concept tied in with an old logo for the brand that the creative team found during their research. The logo from the 1970s saw the letters of the Wrangler name forming the shape of a horse. It may have been what Raillard describes as “cheesy”, but it meant that Fred & Farid’s idea of focusing on the brand’s associations to animals had a heritage. They then tested the concept on the target audience, and connected the idea with the culture of the time. “It was a period when we where facing a crisis” says Fred, “everything was collapsing, the banks were collapsing, and in that period of time we all had the feeling that our human society had reached a limit. So it was relevant to highlight that maybe we’d lost something when we lost our animality…”

The slogan WE ARE ANIMALS was decided upon, though Fred & Farid realized that this high concept ran the risk of backfiring if the execution of the ads was too heavy-handed. The key was to emphasize the animal instincts of humans, but in an unexpectede way. “The first thing we decided was to never show any animals…” says Fred. “To not create confusion – we’re talking about human animality, so the big mistake would be to show an animal. Then we thought with such a strong statement, we couldn’t play around, we had to really do it. The whole background had to be animalistic – spontaneous, not too intellectual. So we decided to set up a way of working on Wrangler that was more spontaneous and creative…”

The team decided to avoid too much planning and over-thinking before the shoot, and to employ a photographer who was skilled in attaining a raw, natural quality to their work. “We looked at photographers not from the ad industry but from art” says Fred. “People who in their personal work are passionate about showing human animality, celebrating animality in humans. We choose Ryan McGinley, as already in his personal work he was really driven by the whole idea of our animality…”

McGinley’s shooting style is loose, and his work follows a tradition of documentary photography begun by artists such as Nan Goldin and Larry Clark. He developed his style in the late 1990s by documenting his friends and acquaintances in New York engaging in parties, sex and general hedonism. When he moved to more formal shoots, using models, he retained this naturalistic approach. A shoot of McGinley’s even a commercial one, will usually involve setting up loose parameters and scenarios, but otherwise letting events evolve naturally, with everything captured on camera.

Fred & Farid wholeheartedly embraced this style of working for Wrangler shoot, which took place in the New Jersey countryside over two nights. Twelve models were selected to take part, drawn not from professional agencies but from street-casting. Actors and performance artists were also among those chosen, and the shoot, when described by Fred, has the feel more of an art performance than a commercial exercise.

“It was a crazy shoot!” he says. “People made love in front of us… everybody got crazy for two nights. It was freezing like hell, we were wearing North Face jackets, and they were naked in nature! Everybody was amazing, everybody went for this art experience. We experimented with any idea that anybody had on set…”

Mcginley, and his assistant, Tim Barber, took thousands of photographs over the two nights, according to Fred. “So you don’t even have time to think about anything – any idea that anyone has you experiment with. It’s chaos, complete chaos… and inside this chaos some pearls pop up…”

The shoot resulted in a set of arresting images, which were used to create the posters that stood at the centre of the WE ARE ANIMALS campaign. Beyond the impact of the images themselfs, what is striking about the posters is the lack of overt branding. The brand’s logo appears at the bottom, alongside the tagline, but otherwise the photographs are given room to breathe, a highly unusual approch in billboard advertising today, where brands have a tendency to shout their messages.

Even the product itself is absent from many of the shoot. “We had to convince them” says Fred. “Clients want to show their product, but we really fought to convince them, to get them on board with us that it is more important to bring back the Wrangler attitude and make a connection with a new generation. They would never have done it by showing the denim, because even if it’s great denim, denim is not a surprising product. We all wear denim now…”

The WE ARE ANIMALS print and poster campaign is a great example of pure branding. Fred & Farid used other media to do the less exciting work of the ad campaign – using the Wrangler website to provide the vital product information, for example – but insisted that the posters be more ambiguous. It was a risk strategy that ultimately paid off for the jeans brand, injecting it with an edge and attitude that allowed Wrangler to stand out within an extremely crowded market.

Wrangler Jeans print advertising campaign, “We Are Animals”, won the Grand Prix for Print at Cannes International Advertising Festival.

The Wrangler campaign was developed at FFL Paris by executive creative directors Fred & Farid (Frederic Raillard and Farid Mokart), art directors/copywriters Julie Louison and Perinne Durand, copywriters Baptiste Clinet, Nicolas Lautier, Philippe Pinel, Frederick Lung. Filming was shot by  Ryan McGinley, known for his nude films.

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Have you ever noticed that the first TV and Press Grand Prix were italian?

1954. European cinema contractors launch the Festival to celebrate great cinema advertising. The first Cannes Grand Prix goes to a spot called “Il Circo” from Italy’s Ferry Mayer for Chlorodont toothpaste.

1992. The Press and Poster category introduced. McCann-Erickson Milan is awarded first Grand Prix in the category for its Levi’s campaign.

Advertising Agency:  McCann-Erickson Italia
Creative Director: Milka Pogliani
Copywriter: Alessandro Canale
Art Director: Stefano Colombo
Photographer: Graham Ford

Good Luck Italy.


Cannes Alternative Grand Prix (2001/2011)

Grand Prix 2001 – FOX Regional Sports (Turkey/China/Russia/India)

A Turkish sports reporter is at a cliff-diving tournament. A diver jumps off a steep cliff, goes into a ‘swan dive’ and lands on dirt. Turkish peasants clap politely. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

A Chinese sports reporter is showing highlights of a ‘tree catching’ competition. We see two lumberjacks chop down a giant 200-ft tree for an athlete to catch. He is not successful. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

A Russian sports reporter is covering a ‘slapping contest’ in a smokey, seedy bunker. Two large men take turns slapping each other in the face. Suddenly, an impressive slap causes the drunken crowd to erupt. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

The host of a Mumbai sports show is interviewing the National Clubbing Champion. Two blindfolded men chase each other with clubs in front of a large crowd. They swing wildly at each other … but miss. Then one loses his bearings and starts pounding a gentleman in the crowd. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

Advertising Agency: Cliff Freeman and Partners, USA
Creative Director: Eric Silver
Copywriter: Dan Morales
Art Director: Rossana Bardales
Production Company: Partizan NY
Director: Traktor

Alternative Grand Prix – John West (Bear)

At a river, a man fights a bear for a salmon. Voiceover: John West endure the worst to bring you the best. Super: John West Red Salmon.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett UK
Creative Director: Mark Tutssel
Copywriter: Paul Silburn
Art Director: Paul Silburn
Production Company: Spectre UK
Director: Daniel Kleinman

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Grand Prix 2002 – Nike (Tag)

A young man is tagged in an elaborate game, involving the entire city. He races off to tag someone else, and they elude him to the very end.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, USA
Creative Director: Dan Wieden, Hal Curtis, Jim Riswold
Art Director: Monica Taylor, Andy Fackrell
Director: Frank Budgen

Alternative Grand Prix – Levis (Odyssey)

A man and a woman hurtle through a string of solid walls. They crash out of the building, land on a tree, and run up it into the night sky.

Advertising Agency: BBH, UK
Creative Director: Stephen Butler
Art Director: Gavin Lester
Production Company: Academy, UK
Director: Jonathan Glazer

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Grand Prix 2003 – IKEA (Lamp)

An old lamp is thrown out to make way for a new one from Ikea.

Advertising Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky, USA
Creative Director: Alex Bogusky, Paul Keister
Art Director: Mark Taylor, Steve Mapp
Copywriter: Ari Merkin
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Spike Jonze

Alternative Grand Prix – Honda (Cog)

Cog is a two-minute chain reaction using only parts from a Honda Accord. Each car part cleverly triggers off the next, showing the beauty and precision of the pieces, and the ingenuity of the engineers who built it, prompting the V/O to comment “Isn’t it nice when things just work?”.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy, London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth
Art Director: Matt Gooden
Copywriter: Ben Walker
Production Company: Partizan, London
Director: Antoine Bardou-Jacquet

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Grand Prix 2004 – Playstation 2 (Mountain)

Hundreds of thousands of people are forming a human mountain higher than any of the other buildings in the city. At it’s zenith a variety of people enjoy a moment of exhilaration before others scramble over them and take their place.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/London
Creative Director: Trevor Beattie
Art Director: Tony McTear
Copywriter: Paula Marcantonio, Tony McTear
Production Company: Gorgeous Enterprises, UK
Director: Frank Budgen

Alternative Grand Prix – Lynx 24-7 (Getting Dressed)

A man and woman wake up in bed. They start getting dressed. We soon discover that their clothes are scattered right across the city. The last shoe sits by two opposite-facing shopping trolleys in a supermarket. The couple met there only hours ago. The man was wearing Lynx 24/7 bodyspray.

Advertising Agency: BBH, UK
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Art Director: Nick Gill
Copywriter: Nick Gill
Production Company: Small Family Business, UK
Director: Ringan Ledwidge

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Grand Prix 2005 – Honda (Grrr)

Can hate be a good thing? Honda ‘Grrr’ sets out to prove just that. A tranquil world is invaded by flying, dirty old Diesel engines. However, the population get angry and even, using their hate for the better, destroying every last one. Finally, they herald the brand new Honda Diesel.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy, London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth, Chris O’reilly
Art Director: Sean Thompson, Michael Russoff, Richard Russell
Copywriter: Sean Thompson, Michael Russoff, Richard Russell
Production Company: Nexus Production, London
Director: Adam Foulkes, Alan Smith

Alternative Grand Prix – Adidas (Hello Tomorrow)

Adidas 1 is the first shoe with a computer. “Hello Tomorrow” demonstrates that with every step these magical shoes can create an entirely new world out of nothing. It is a story of rebirth and
taking your first steps – again.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/Chiat/Day, San Francisco
Creative Director: Lee Clow, Chuck McBride, Joe Kayser
Art Director: Joe Kayser
Copywriter: Chuck McBride
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Spike Jonze

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Grand Prix 2006 – Guinness (Noitulove)

Three young men at a bar drink Guinness. Suddenly the action pauses and the film starts to play in reverse. The men walk backwards out of the bar. As they walk they seamlessly go back down the evolutionary chain through hundreds, thousands, millions of years. Super: GUINNESS. Good things come to those who wait.

Advertising Agency: Abbott, Mead, Vickers, BBDO, UK
Creative Director: Paul Brazier
Art Director: Matt Doman
Copywriter: Ian Heartfield
Production Company: Kleinman Productions, London
Director: Danny Kleinman

Alternative Grand Prix – Sony (Balls)

Dropping 250,000 brightly coloured bouncy balls down the streets of San Francisco for real = colour like no other.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative Director: Richard Flintman
Art Director: Juan Cabral
Copywriter: Juan Cabral
Production Company: MJZ, London
Director: Nicolai Fuglsig

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Grand Prix 2007 – Dove (Evolution)

We created a film that exposed the manipulation of the female image in the media. The objective was to encourage discussion around the subject of real beauty and lead people to the campaignforrealbeauty website.”

Advertising Agency: Ogilvy & Mother Toronto
Creative Director: Janet Kestin, Nancy Vonk
Art Director: Tim Piper, Mike Kirkland
Copywriter: Tim Piper
Production Company: Reginald Pike, Toronto
Director: Yael Staav, Tim Piper

Alternative Grand Prix – Epuron (Power of Wind)

Wind has a strong nature. Better keep him busy…

Advertising Agency: Nordpol + Hamburg, Germany
Creative Director: Lars Ruehmann
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann, Joakim Reveman
Copywriter: Matthew Branning
Production Company: Paranoid Projects, USA
Director: The Vikings

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Grand Prix 2008 – Cadbury (Gorilla)/Microsoft (Halo 3 Campaign)

We hear ‘In the air tonight’ by Phil Collins as we realize we’re in front of a calm looking gorilla. ‘I’ve been waiting for this moment for all of my life…’ The ape stretches its neck like a heavyweight boxer would do before a fight. He’s sitting in front of a massive drum kit as the best drum fill of the history of rock is coming. The Gorilla knows this. He smashes the drums phenomenally – feeling every beat. The camera leaves the ape and his drum. United, the way they are meant to be.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative Director: Richard Flinthan, Juan Cabral
Art Director: Juan Cabral
Copywriter: Juan Cabral
Production Company: Blink, London
Director: Juan Cabral

On-line, the Halo 3 website served as a virtual museum, providing an interactive fly through of the entire John 117 monument and putting visitors right in the middle of the fight. They could also learn more about our enemies and hear first hand stories from the men who were there. For that we filmed interviews with surviving veterans of the battle who served with Master Chief. They talked about their experiences and spoke with reverence and awe about what it was like to serve with mankind’s greatest hero.

Advertising Agency: T.A.G. San Francisco/McCann Worldgroup
Creative Director: Geoff Edwars, Scott Duchon
Art Director: Ben Wolan
Copywriter: Rich Herrera
Production Company: Go Film, Hollywood/RSA Films Los Angeles
Director: Simon McQuoid, Rupert Sanders, Neil Blomkamp

Alternative Grand Prix – Nike (Next Level)

“Next Level” is new take on Football from Nike. Made to inspire football obsessed teens, the film is a first-person journey up the football ranks–from being discovered by Arsenal in a youth match to a life-defining moment playing for our national side. Along the way we experience success (finishing a cross from Cesc Fabregas) as well as frustration (getting burned by Ronaldinho). The film celebrates playing the game with purpose and passion. It shows what it takes to become a modern, brilliant fofotballer – to take your game to the next level.

Advertising Agency: 72 And Sunny, USA
Creative Director: Glen Cole, John Boiler, Bryan Rowles, Jason Norcross
Production Company: Anonymous Content, USA
Director: Guy Ritchie

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Grand Prix 2009 – Philips (Carousel)

Philips set out to own the idea of a cinematic viewing experience at home. From the start the strategy was to create a film that movie lovers would want to see.

The film is hosted within a site that, through interaction, educates the audience about the three main features of Philips televisions – Ambilight, Cinema 21:9 and Picture Quality – and ties these features to the act of film making. So, what would movie lovers want to see? We decided on a seamless tracking shot, one long take that a film loving audience could marvel at and be fascinated by. Within the ‘housing’ of a tracking shot we inserted behind the scenes glimpses where the experts could talk about their craft and the decisions they made whilst filming the shot. The DOP on lighting, the Director on the 21:9 format and VFX supervisor shows why picture quality is so important. To allow for more interaction, we decided that a frozen time film, shot using a state of the art motion control rig, would give the audience control upon interaction allowing them to literally move the camera back and forth frame by frame. This is done intuitively through a ‘grabbing hand’ cursor when the screen is moused over.

What makes this interaction really special is the interactive cinematic score. The score, composed by Michael Fakesch, was composed as a linear piece, but was then handed over to a flash music developer to carve up and distort as the user moved back and forth through time, frame by frame – all designed to pull the audience in and hold them there longer whilst they try to unravel the mystery of how the film was made.

The second main element of interaction is the way the audience is able to trigger the three behind-the-scenes educational scenes from the film’s timeline. When the user clicks on the timeline, they reveal films within the film. The timeline unfolds and expands, the post production disappears, each expert walks in and the rigging reappears revealing that all along the actors were simply holding their position whilst a state of the art motion rig captured them in frozen time. All this was designed to be as seamless as possible with maximum visual reward ensuring the audience clicked all three of the hotspots.

In addition to the interaction within the film, the ratio of the film itself could be changed at anytime through first person interaction. This simple, but effective comparison tool really did get across the spectacle of the new Philips 21:9 TV. The other elegantly simple piece of interaction is Ambilight on and off, in the words of the DOP – “you really miss it when it’s not there.”  A final point worth noting is the dynamic title sequence. Instead of a traditional loader, we crafted a title sequence correspond to the speed of the users internet connection. The slower the connection, the longer the sequence.

Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB Amsterdam
Creative Director: Michael Fakesch, Chris Baylis, Andrew Ferguson
Art Director: Mariota Essery, Maximilliano Chanan
Copywriter: Carla Madden
Production Company: Stink Digital, London
Director: Adam Berg

Alternative Grand Prix – T-Mobile (Dance)

On 15th January at 11am, a single commuter started dancing in the middle of a train station. The dance grew as more dancers joined in, until there were over 300 people perfectly choreographed. The excitement caused hundred’s of genuine unsuspecting members of the public to join in and share the moment.

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, London
Creative Director: Paul Silburn, Kate Stanners
Art Director: Rick Dodds
Copywriter: Stephen Howell
Production Company: Partizan, London
Director: Michael Gracey

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Grand Prix 2010 – Old Spice (The Men Your Man Could Smell Like)

This TV commercial was created to appeal to men as well as women, showing them both how great a man can smell when they use Old Spice Body Wash.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Creative Director: Mark Fitzloff, Susan Hoffman
Art Director: Craig Allen, Eric Kallman
Copywriter: Craig Allen, Eric Kallmacanal
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Tom Kuntz

Alternative Grand Prix – Canal + (Closet)

Canal+ launched its new ‘Original Creativity’ campaign in September 2009. The objective highlight to Canal+’s showcase of original programming, consisting of series, documentaries and fictions, created exclusively by and for Canal+, scripted by prestigious writers such as Olivier Marchal and Jean- Hugues Anglade. To launch this new campaign, we produced THE CLOSET. The film unites quality, humour, originality and a touch of impertinence inherent to the brand’s communications: ‘Never underestimate the power of a great story”

Advertising Agency: BETC EURO RSCG, Paris
Creative Director: Stephane Xiberras
Art Director: Eric Astorgue
Copywriter: Jean Christophe Royer
Production Soixan7e Quin5e, Paris
Director: Matthijs van Heijningen

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Grand Prix 2011 – Nike (Write the Future)

Every four years, the keys to football heaven are dangled in front of the international elite. One goal, one pass, one game saving tackle can be the difference between fame and forgotten. What happens on the pitch in that split second has a ripple effect that goes beyond the match and the tournament.
‘Write the Future’ was a messaging platform that allowed Nike to show how football creates this ripple effect. It allowed us to give a glimpse into the future to see what the players were really playing for, in their own lives and the lives of those that follow them. Our goal was to weave the brand into the conversations around this major tournament in a way that celebrated the participating teams and athletes and engaged football fans around the world.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Amsterdam
Creative Director: Jeff Kling, Mark Bernath, Eric Quennoy
Art Director: Stuart Harkness, Freddie Powell
Copywriter: Stuart Harkness, Freddie Powell
Production Company: Independent Films, London
Director: Alejandro Gonzales Inarritu

Alternative Grand Prix – Volkswagen (The Force)/Crysler (Born of Fire)

For the all-new 2012 Passat , Volkswagen brings Star Wars™ to one of TV’s most talked about events. Accompanied by John Williams’ iconic “The Imperial March,” the spot features the most infamous villain in the galaxy, a pint-sized Darth Vader who uses the Force when he discovers the all-new 2012 Passat in the driveway. The two iconic brands leverage humor and the unforgettable Star Wars score to create an emotional spot and make Super Bowl ad history.

Advertising Agency: Deutsch, Los Angeles
Creative Director: Eric Springer, Michael Kadin
Art Director: Ryan Mclaughlin, Craig Melchiano
Copywriter: David Povill
Production Park Pictures, Santa Monica
Director: Lance Acord

Of the big three American car companies, Chrysler was in the most danger of failing. Had there not been a last-minute vote of confidence from the U.S. Government, they would not exist. This was public knowledge, debated throughout the country—should we have loaned Chrysler the money?  When it came time to introduce a new product, we had a car to sell and also had to win back America’s confidence. To do this, we took the unlikely position of embracing Chrysler’s Detroit heritage when every other American car company was distancing themselves from the city.  We created a 2-minute homage to Detroit, a city primed for a comeback, and ran the spot only once, on Super Bowl Sunday.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy Portland
Creative Director: Mark Fitzloff, Susan Hoffman, Aaron Allen
Art Director: Jim Lasser
Copywriter: Mark Fitzloff, Joe Staples, Kevin Jones, Greg Rutter, Dan Kroeger
Production: Serial Pictures, Culver City
Director: Samuel Bayer


Canon EOS – Photochains

Insights, Strategy & the Idea
Our brief was to promote Canon EOS, a leading brand of DSLR cameras. We began with a simple insight that great photography is not about technology, it is about inspiration. Our solution was ‘EOS Photochains’ – A new way for people to be inspired, that would literally spread from one photographer to the next as a new creative experience. By transforming photography from something people traditionally do on their own into a unique way to connect with others, Photochains is growing as its own social network of photography, and a new creative experienceWe began with a simple insight that great photography is not about technology, it is about inspiration. Our solution was ‘EOS Photochains’ – A new way for people to be inspired, that would literally spread from one photographer to the next as a new creative experience. By transforming photography from something people traditionally do on their own into a unique way to connect with others, Photochains is growing as its own social network of photography, and a new creative experience.

Creative Execution
Photochains was created by integrating the advertising, live social media network and photographers as one:

Our first step was to create a photochain, which we showcased in national television, print and online advertising. This directed people to the photochains website, where they could upload photos to continue the chain we had started. Once online, people could also start their own photochains, or join those created by others. People soon became the medium for the campaign, inviting friends, family and colleagues to join their photochains. As the photochains network grew, we ran real photochains and the photographers who had created them, in our national advertising. This constantly showcased the live network of photochains, integrating the growing community with the advertising itself, as a way to constantly attract a growing audience. Photochains is now growing as its own social media platform, which continues to grow with every photo.

Results and Effectiveness
Photochains has created a new way for photographers to connect through photography, as well as a new dialogue between Canon EOS and the photographic community:
– 94 photos uploaded every day since launch, which is 4 photos an hour
– 12 minutes average time on website
– Over 20,000 photos uploaded from around Australia to date
– Canon EOS has risen to a record 67% market share in Australia since launch

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett, Sydney
Executive Creative Director: Andy DiLallo, Jay Benjamin,
Creative Group Head: Michael Canning
Art Director Kieran Antill
Digital Creative Director: Kieran Ots
Year: 2010
Lions Grand Prix for Media
Gold, Silver and two Bronze awards in the Direct category
Silver award for the Promo and Activations category
Silver award in the PR category


Nedbank – Power to the people (the world’s first Solar Powered Billboard)


Generallly billboards are viewed as visual pollution. So we created a billboard that actually gives back to the community. By attaching solar panels, the billboard is able to supply energy to the school that feed 1100 kids, in one of South Africa’s poorest townships. This socially-aware approach to outdoor not only changes the public perception of billboards, but also builds the brand personality of our client, Nedbank, who through social upliftment projects are seen as the bank that cares about more than just money. Their payoff line, “Make Things Happen” is elevated from mere words into a tangible demonstration.

This billboard was the first of many that are being rolled out across South Africa in an attempt to create advertising that makes a real difference.

Apart from the value to the community and the 1100 kids that are being fed daily with the help of the power supplied by the billboard, the piece received extensive coverage in the mainstream media (beyond the “media and marketing” pages) with numerous write-ups in national publications, coverage on national radio and television news. It was also picked up by Contagious Magazine as a leading example of branded utility. All this “talk value” has played an invaluable role in the establishment of Nedbank as the bank that cares about more than just money.

According to AdAge, What ultimately swayed the jury in the favor of the NedBank “Power to the People” work was that the solar power being collected by the billboard was helping to power several community buildings, including a schoolhouse. That the work made a difference in the community made all the difference to the jury. At a time when it is so common to have short-term promotions, that the “work that continues to work and continues providing” was key”, said jury chair Jean-Remy Von Matt, founder-chairman, Jung Von Matt, Hamburg.

Advertising Agency: Net#Work BBDO, South Africa
Creative Directors: Julian Watt
Art Director: Jonathan Santana
Copywriter: Brad Reilly
Year: 2007
Grand Prix


10 Best Japanese Commercials

1 – Sagami Robber Industries – LONG DISTANCE
Publicising the product benefits of Sagami Original, the world’s thinnest condom at just 0.02 mm. By communicating a “love” theme, we were able to build an aimiable brand image that differed from other competitors. We used a real long distance couple from the entries received and asked them to run a 1000 km marathon.
The goal is for the two to embrace. When they do embrace, the distance between them, that began at 1,000,000,000 mm is now 0 mm..”.. and yet love needs distance”, is inserted, and the distance is pushed back to 0.02 mm. Thus the benefit of the world thinnest condom.
Advertising Agency: GT, Tokyo
Executive Creative Director: Takahisa Mitsumori
Copywriter: Naoki Ito
Art Director: Naoki Ito
Production Company: Rock & Roll, Tokyo
Director: Kan Equchi
Year: 2009
Gold Lion

2 – Nissin Cup Noodles – HUNGRY? Campaign

MOA
A tribe of primitive men in search of food chase a Moa bird. It leads them to the edge of a cliff where the Moa jumps into the air and the men fall over the precipice.
SYNTHETOCERAS
A tribe of primitive men in search of food chase a Synthetoceras into a hole. It repeatedly pops its head up in a different hole, thus exhausting its pursuers.
QUETZALCOATLUS
The primitive men pretend to be Quetzalcoatlus babies and beg for food, but once again they fail.
MAMMOTH

UNITATHERIUM
The primitive men are all over the Unitatherium, like bees on a honeycomb. Will they win at last? Not this time.
GIANT WARTDOG

GIANT SQUID

FISHING
In which a well-known prehistoric family go fishing. Father is let down over a cliff’s edge on a baitless hook … Hungry? Try Nissin Seafood Cup Noodles.
HARVEST
In which our prehistoric family try to get some fruit by beating a tree with a club. Fruit falls down. So does a sabre-toothed tiger … Hungry? Try Nissin Cup Noodles.
SNEAKING THIEF
In which the father of our prehistoric family spies some meat by the sleeping sabre-toothed tiger. But as he tries to grab it, the tiger awakes … Hungry? Try Nissin Cup Noodles.
Advertising Agency: Hakuhodo, Japan
Creative Director: Susumu Miyazaki
Copywriter: Tonomi Maeda
Art Director: Kuzohiro Suda
Production Company: Tohokushinsha Film Corporation
Director: Shinya Nakajima
Year: 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996
Grand Prix/Gold Lion/Silver Lion/Bronze Lion

3 – Morinaga & Co. Carrè de Chocolat – NON-BLINKING WOMAN
We made this commercial to show the appeal of “Carre-de-chocolat”, meltingly velvety authentic chocolate, particularly to married women in their 30s. The concept behind the product is that it can be enjoyed as part of relaxing moments in between their busy household work. The ad was very successful and “Carre-de-chocolat” has become a main brand in the chocolate category, even though it was a generic product.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yoshiro Sato
Copywriter: Makoto Shinohara/Tsunao Arita
Production Company: Mothers, Tokyo
Director: Jun Kawanishi
Year: 2008
Bronze Lion

4 – Toyota – HUMANITY
The film takes the form of a simple flowing narrative drive of a Toyota car through an urban/suburban environment. Whilst the film takes an elegant and traditional filmic approach in its portrayal of the car and its surroundings, various details and features of the Toyota range cars are depicted with a more bizarre twist. Instead of seeing the exact technical nature of the design features of the car, each item is depicted in a much more personal way using human “experts” to represent the function on show.
Advertising Agency: Hakuhodo, Tokyo
Creative Director: Hideyuki Tanno/Tetsuya Tokimatsu/Masahiko Ishii
Copywriter: Tetsuya Tokimatsu
Art Director: Hideyuki Tanno
Production Company: Stink, London
Director: Ne-o
Year: 2006
Silver Lion

5 – Champagne Nicolas Feullatte – TOAST MEN
In this commercial for Champagne Nicolas Feuillatte, scientists search for stronger glasses with which to give toasts. On behalf of Nihon Shurui Hanbai, we wanted to say to everyone, “many cheers!”
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yoshimitsu Sawamoto
Copywriter: Mayu Taguchi/Sohei Okano/Yuriko Taki
Art Director: Hideyuki Tanno
Production Company: Dentsu Creative X, Tokyo
Director: Jun Kawanishi
Year: 2011
Bronze Lion


6 – Nike – NIKE MUSIC SHOE

Nike launched NIKE FREE RUN+, the new addition to the NIKE FREE footwear line in late March 2010. The main communications campaign conveyed the new model’s incredible flexibility with the tagline “Free like feet want to be”. Nike Japan further wanted to develop an idea that creates buzz about the shoe’s flexibility and NIKE+ compatibility. The idea was the NIKE MUSIC SHOE. Why not make a real musical instrument utilising the shoe’s unique bending features and create a soundtrack with it? The music performance was commissioned to breakbeats unit HIFANA, who collaborated in the creation of the instruments and also wrote the song.
Advertising Agency: Wieden+Kennedy, Tokyo
Creative Director: Frank Hahn/Naoki Ito
Copywriter: Hiroshi Kuyama/Takayuki Rokutan
Art Director: Shingo Ohno/Naoki Ga
Production Company: Taiyo Kikaku, Tokyo
Director: Kosai Sekine
Year: 2010
Bronze Lion

7 – Secam Home Security – THE BIG TEST
SECOM Home Security Service offers various individualised services, and closely watches over the safety and security of their customers 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. In this commercial, we showed the importance of having a security system by highlighting the fact that not everyone can resist the temptations right in front of them.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Hiroshi Sasaki
Copywriter: Yoshimitsu Sawamoto
Art Director: Naoki Ito
Production Company: Geek Picture, Tokyo
Director: Akira Nagai
Year: 2008
Silver Lion

8 – Panasonic Oxyride Battery – MANNED FLIGHT
Powering a plain with household batteries.
Advertising Agency: Hakuhodo, Tokyo
Creative Director: Katsunori Tsuyama/Satoru Yokoyama/Toshikazu Ieda
Copywriter: Toshiya Inoue/Kan Ishii/Kosuke Masuda
Production Company: Hat, Tokyo
Director: Kaoru Yamaguchi
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion


9 –
Ajinomoto Stadium – HUSKY GIRLS

A young man has moved to a new town. He finds all the women there very beautiful, but their voices are hideously hoarse from cheering.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yuya Furukama
Copywriter: Hiroyo Kanehako
Art Director: Hiroyo Kanehako
Production Company: Dentsu TEC, Tokyo
Director: Jun Kawanishi
Year: 2005
Silver Lion


10 – Esthe Wam Hair Removal – BEAUTY BOWLING
For women, being beautiful is about keeping challenging themselves. This ad shows the tragedy of a woman at a beauty championship who failed to take care of herself. It expresses how one single hair can divide the winner and the loser by using the game of bowling by communicating that their body would be perfect with Esthe WAM because they offer professional care during and after the treatment.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yuya Furukawa
Copywriter: Moto Takagi
Art Director: Masahide Yoshimi
Production Company: Tohokushinsha Film Corporation, Tokyo
Director: Masahiro Takata
Year: 2005
Bronze Lion