Titanic in advertising

 Centraal Beheer

Four men transport a heavy box with precious contents to a waiting ship. The box survives lots of dangers and finally arrives safe. Unfortunately the ship is the Titanic.
Advertising Agency: DDB Needham, Netherlands
Year: 1993
Gold Lion

Der Spiegel Magazine


Advertising Agency: Springer & Jacoby
Year: 1998

Gradiente Home Theatre


Advertising Agency: Young & Rubicam, Brazil
Year: 1998

Alka Seltzer


Advertising Agency: BBDO Portugal
Year: 1998

Audi


Advertising Agency: Tandem DDB, Spain
Year: 1999

Titanic Food Festival


Advertising Agency: PSL Erickson, India
Year: 1999

Publicaciones Semana


Advertising Agency: Lowe & Partner, Colombia
Year: 1999

Canal +


Advertising Agency: Equator Belgium
Year: 2000
Shortlist

Priya Village Cinema


Advertising Agency: Contract Advertising, India
Year: 2000

Canal +


Advertising Agency: EURO RSCG BETC, France
Year: 2000

Star Channel

In a scene reminiscent of “Titanic”, the workers in an office try to fix a broken shelf.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Year: 2001

Fisherman’s Friends


Advertising Agency: Springer & Jacoby
Year: 2003

Meio & Mensagem Magazine


Advertising Agency: Neogama BBH, Sao Paulo
Year: 2003

Citroen XSara Picasso


Advertising Agency: Duezt EURO RSCG, Sao Paulo
Year: 2003

 Soken DVD

This series show the problems when you play a DVD player. It then recommends a Soken DVD player instead. The office girl talks to her friend at the elevator about the ‘Titanic’ DVD she saw yesterday. However, she isn’t speaking smoothly. Why? Because her DVD player can’t play smoothly either.
Advertising Agency: EURO RSCG Flagship, Bangkok
Year: 2004
Gold Lion

Sony Wega Home Theatre


Advertising Agency: BBDO Chile
Year: 2004

L’Equipe Sport Magazine


Advertising Agency: DDB Paris
Year: 2005

Dakino Film Festival


Advertising Agency: Lowe & Partners, Romania
Year: 2005


 Volkswagen Fox

A ship, a man, a woman. Ship sinks. Man dead. Woman alive. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Titanic” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.
Advertising Agency: DDB Dusseldorf
Year: 2006
Silver Lion

LG Home Theater


Advertising Agency: Lowe Porta, Chile
Year: 2004

Blockbuster

We see the memorable scene where the Terminator is going to be melted in the industrial plant, everything occurs as normal, but the soundtrack we hear is “My Heart Will Go On” from Titanic. In the credits we read “Terminator or Titanic? Take Both, Tuesdays 2X1 at BlockBuster”
Advertising Agency: BBDO Guatemala
Year: 2006
Shortlist

Panasonic Veira Plasma TV


Advertising Agency: Lowe Porta, Santiago
Year: 2006
Shortlist

History Channel


Advertising Agency: Ogilvy South Africa
Year: 2006

TV Guide


Advertising Agency: Jung von Matt, Germany
Year: 2006

Hyundai


Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume, Brussels
Year: 2006

HENKEL Loctite


Advertising Agency: DDB Milan
Year: 2007

Montex Carbon Paper


Advertising Agency: Percept H, Mumbai
Year: 2007

Utopia Groups Cinema


Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume, Belgium
Year: 2007

McDowell’s Diet Mate Whisky


Advertising Agency: Mudra Communication, Bangalore India
Year: 2007

Spontex


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Year: 2007

L’Express


Advertising Agency: Bambuck, Paris
Year: 2007

Megastar Cineplex


Advertising Agency: Ogilvy & Mather, Vietnam
Year: 2007

TAM Airlines


Advertising Agency: Young & Rubicam Sao Paulo
Year: 2008
Shortlist

Toys ‘R Us


Advertising Agency: Volcano Advertising, South Africa
Year: 2008

Cape Times


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull
Year: 2008

Kaercher (immersion pump)


Advertising Agency: FJR Werbeagentour, Munich
Year: 2009

RIOS Illustration Studios


Advertising Agency: Artplan, Brazil
Year: 2009

Textliner Faber-Castell


Advertising Agency: Young & Rubicam Malaysia
Year: 2009

Show Off Film


Advertising Agency: Fuel Lisbon/Euro RSCG
Year: 2009

Orange Foundation


Advertising Agency: Ignitionk, Madrid
Year: 2009

Rocklets Chocolate Candies

We see the Titanic sailing over the dark waters of the Atlantic Ocean. In the crow’s nest there’s a watchman, personified by a Yellow chocolate Rocklets. Suddenly, he spots a huge iceberg and informs the other Rocklets who desperately trie to alert the Captain. As soon as he takes off to do so, a huge human hand takes it away and eats it. The Rocklet was never able to inform the ship that it is about to crash into an iceberg. Super: The beginning of the history of a Rocklets is very close to the end.
Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett Argentina
Year: 2009

Post-It


Advertising Agency: BBDO Mexico
Year: 2010

Vodafone


Advertising Agency: Scholz & Friends Duesseldorf
Year: 2010

Canal + 


Advertising Agency: BETC EURO RSCG, Paris
Year: 2010

Iffco Financial Service


Advertising Agency: Publicis India
Year: 2010

Mitsubishi


Advertising Agency: BBDO Santiago
Year: 2010


 Melody Enterteinment

The first all Arabic movie channel makes its take on ‘Titanic’.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett Cairo
Year: 2010
Bronze Lion

Ford KA


Advertising Agency: Bassat Ogilvy Group, Madrid
Year: 2011

Washin Bifocal Glasses


Advertising Agency: Grey Tokyo
Year: 2011

Listerine


Advertising Agency: JWT Mumbai
Year: 2011

Braun Silk-Epil


Advertising Agency: Impact BBDO, UAE
Year: 2011


Budweiser – The Story of WHASSUP?!

OVERVIEW

In December 1999 Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc., had the two best-selling beers in the United States and more than double the market share of any competitor. Despite a decade-long decline in sales, Budweiser, the company’s flagship brew, remained the country’s most popular alcoholic beverage, although, thanks largely to the growing consumer preference for reduced-calorie beer, Bud Light was poised to overtake the ‘‘King of Beers.’’

Anheuser-Busch already had the industry’s biggest and most successful advertising presence, but the Budweiser television campaign called ‘‘Whassup?!’’ resonated with a new, more youthful audience and became not just an industry award winner but also a pop-culture phenomenon.
The idea behind the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ commercials, developed for Anheuser-Busch by DDB Worldwide Chicago, was simple. In the initial spot, called ‘‘Whassup True,’’ four male friends, speaking over the phone, greeted one another with the slang phrase ‘‘Whassup?!’’ The answer— ‘‘Watching the game. Having a Bud’’— elicited the response ‘‘True, true,’’ before the conversation escalated into a chorus of ‘‘Whassups?!’’ delivered with mouths open, tongues protruding, and an air of intense glee.

‘‘It didn’t feel like advertising,’’ said DDB’s Don Pogany. ‘‘It seemed different than anything else. And it seemed to be totally what Bud is about: camaraderie and friendship and what guys do.’’ A second spot aired during the 2000 Super Bowl, and several more featuring the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ guys aired later in the winter. Each of the spots ended with the Budweiser logo against a black background and the tagline ‘‘True.’’

Within a few months of the campaign’s introduction, unauthorized Internet parodies began to appear that featured people in the news, cartoon superheroes, and many others greeting one another with innumerable variations on ‘‘Whassup?!’’ Disc jockeys and late-night talkshow hosts began saying ‘‘Whassup?!’’ and soon it became a common greeting and a pop-culture phrase around the world, even in countries where Budweiser was not sold. The initial campaign won nearly every major industry award, and later installments continued to win awards. ‘‘Whassup?!’’ ran through 2001 and was then developed into a more expansive campaign called ‘‘True,’’ in which the tagline from the original commercials was interpreted in new ways meant to show beer drinkers that Budweiser understood them and their lives.






TARGET MARKET

Anheuser-Busch expected the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ ads to resonate across demographic lines within the 21- to 27-yearold segment of the population, an essential part of Budweiser’s larger target market of all legal-age drinkers. Not only did this segment of young adults account for a disproportionate percentage of beer sales relative to other adults, its brand loyalties had presumably not yet been formed. The spots featured a mostly African-American cast, and the campaign’s central verbal exchange was based on slang terms used in minority communities, although the universal principles of friendship that were displayed had the power, Anheuser-Busch believed, to attract young viewers across racial, ethnic, and gender divides. Barbara Lippert argued in Adweek that the ads were about ‘‘feeling so connected to your best buds you can watch TV together through the phone. And that while you are supposedly ‘chillin,’ you are all maniacally dialing each other.’’
Anheuser-Busch, however, wanted to avoid alienating older customers who did not understand the significance of the characters’ boisterous attitudes and protruding tongues. When a group of wholesalers expressed their disapproval of the emerging campaign, Lachky and Busch decided not to continue to air the original version but to showcase ‘‘Whassup?!’’ spots that relied on individual narratives and thereby helped viewers make sense of the characters. They also decided to trim the 60-second spots to 30 seconds in order to reduce the amount of time occupied by the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ ritual itself. Soon Internet parodies began, and the campaign attracted mainstream media attention. Once ‘‘Whassup?!’’ became part of the pop-culture vocabulary, the campaign had an air of widespread public validation that overcame all demographic divisions. As Advertising Age put it, ‘‘Any advertising that bridges generation gaps so that even our mothers are leaving ‘Whassup?!’ messages on our answering machines must be a good one.’’

THE QUESTION OF ORIGIN

After ‘‘Whassup?!’’ had won both the Grand Clio and the Cannes Grand Prix in 2000, there were complaints within the advertising industry. Some felt that it was inappropriate to give the industry’s highest honors to a campaign that had not originally come from an advertising agency at all. The idea, of course, was Charles Stone III’s, and the initial spot was similar to his independent film True. But Stone was not himself the sole author of the idea. ‘‘Whassup?!’’ was a greeting that he and his friends had been using with one another since 1984.

MARKETING STRATEGY

‘‘Whassup?!’’ had its genesis outside the advertising world in a short film called True, created by music-video director Charles Stone III as a means of trying to break into feature films. A DDB creative director discovered True and immediately recommended it to his supervisor as suitable for a Budweiser advertisement. The film, which became ‘‘Whassup True’’ after minor adjustments in content, featured Stone and three of his friends. Stone himself was tapped to direct and to act in the series of commercials DDB began scripting, and though roughly 80 other actors were auditioned for the parts of Stone’s friends, with one exception DDB hired the real-life friends to play themselves. Stone worried that the slang response ‘‘True’’ might need to be scrapped in favor of a more mainstream line like ‘‘Right on,’’ but Anheuser-Busch’s Lachky recognized the trend setting potential of the original.

‘‘Whassup True’’ originally aired with little fanfare on sports programming in December 1999. The 60-second commercial was a hit with the 21- to 27-yearold demographic, but for the 2000 Super Bowl Anheuser-Busch chose the shorter and less risky ‘‘Girlfriend,’’ in which one of the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ friends answered the phone in characteristic fashion while trying not to let on that the ‘‘game’’ he was watching with his girlfriend was actually a figure-skating competition. Other spots in the original campaign included one in which a pizza deliverer was mistaken for a friend and subjected, over an apartment-building intercom, to the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ routine. The spots eventually ran during sports programming, as well as prime-time and late-night shows.
After Internet parodies and media attention became widespread, ‘‘Whassup?!’’ was at risk of becoming overexposed, and Anheuser-Busch and DDB worked to keep the campaign fresh by running their own spoofs. In ‘‘Come Home’’ an alien, returning to his home planet after infiltrating Earth in the guise of a dog, was asked by his ruler what he had learned from his time among humans. After a short pause the alien declared, mouth wide and tongue lolling, ‘‘Whassup?!’’ In addition, DDB created a unique hybrid commercial called ‘‘Language Tape,’’ in which a professor-like character directed viewers to Budweiser.com, where they could learn how to say ‘‘Whassup?!’’ in 36 different languages. Website traffic increased to 1.265 million visitors per month, compared to the previous year’s average of 400,000.

Anheuser-Busch and DDB went on to run commercials featuring New Jersey men bearing a strong resemblance to characters on the hit television show The Sopranos, who said, ‘‘Howyoudoin,’’ instead of ‘‘Whassup?!’’ After this final twist on the original idea, Budweiser’s advertising agencies, along with its in-house marketing team, began producing various television spots that more broadly interpreted the tagline ‘‘True.’’ These spots included story lines offering honest and affectionate reflections on gender differences and male behavior, commercials with a focus on product quality, and several series of vignettes, such as the well-known ‘‘Leon’’ commercials, which revolved around the comical exploits of an extremely self-centered professional football player.


TALK VALUE

DDB Worldwide Chicago claimed to have pioneered the concept of ‘‘talk value,’’ that elusive quality that makes advertising campaigns and phrases cultural touchstones, but the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ campaign far exceeded the agency’s and Anheuser-Busch’s expectations. The phrase appeared as a headline on the cover of Forbes, and the commercials were parodied on Saturday Night Live in addition to being mentioned countless times in the media while being spread around the world via more than 80 homemade Internet parodies. At the 2000 Grammy Awards performers Christina Aguilera and LeVar Burton imitated the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ commercials on the red carpet, and during that year’s NBA season the Sacramento Kings gave a collective cry of ‘‘Whassup?!’’ after each team huddle.

Whassup?! /Scary Movie

Whassup?!/Super Mario Bros

Whassup?!/The Simpson

Whassup?!/Bin Laden & George Bush

Whassup?!/Parrots

OUTCOME

‘‘Whassup?!’’ was one of the most acclaimed and popular campaigns in advertising history. It won nearly every major award in the industry, including the prestigious Grand Clio and the Grand Prix at the International Advertising Festival in Cannes, France. During the second year of the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ campaign, Busch was named Advertiser of the Year at the Cannes festival. The campaign’s signature phrase earned comparisons to classic advertising phrases like Wendy’s ‘‘Where’s the Beef ?’’ and Nike’s ‘‘Just Do It.’’ Busch said of the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ campaign, ‘‘In our lifetimes, we’ll never see so much value created from a single idea. It makes Budweiser a brand for every culture, every demographic and every community. It makes Budweiser a younger, hipper, more contemporary brand.’’

The decline in Budweiser sales could not be stopped, however. Meanwhile, sales of Bud Light continued to grow at double-digit rates, and in 2001 it surpassed Budweiser to become the best-selling beer in the United States. Anheuser-Busch continued to dominate the domestic beer market. In 2000 the company increased shipments and sales by 2.8 percent, and in 2001 it likewise outperformed the industry, approaching a market share of nearly 50 percent. Budweiser’s umbrella ‘‘True’’ campaign, so memorably launched by the ‘‘Whassup?!’’ commercials, continued.

Advertising Agency: DDB Chicago
Creative Director: Bob Scarpelli
Copywriter: Charles Stone III
Art Director: Chuck Taylor
Production Company: C&C Storm Films
Director: Charles Stone III

Whassup?! For Obama
Its been eight long years since the boys said ‘Wassup’ to each other. Even with the effects of a down economy and imminent change in the White House, the boys are still able to come together and stay true to what really matters. The spot is in essence a public service announcement for President Obama’s message of change.

Advertising Agency: Believe Media
Creative Director: Charles Stone III
Director: Charles Stone III


Volkswagen Fox/Short but Fun – Complete Case History



A robbery. A burger. A dance contest. An overdose. A shot in the head. A robbery. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Pulp Fiction” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

A ship, a man, a woman. Ship sinks. Man dead. Woman alive. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Titanic” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

Vacant hotel. Lonesome family, sick father. Psychic power. Bloody ending. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Shining” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

A great white shark. Lots of dead people. A bunch of fearless men. A dead shark. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Jaws” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

An obsessed girl. A priest. An expulsion. A dead priest. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “The Exorcist” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

A space ship. An alien. A nightmare. One survivor.
Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Alien” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

A princess. A dark lord. A Jedi. A death-star. A battle. A happy end. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Starwars” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

CASE HISTORY
Question: What do one German mini-car, six Hollywood blockbusters and a fast-talking cast of cartoon bunnies have in common? Answer: They all figured prominently in a wildly original and successful TV advertising campaign that last year earned a Gold World Medal in the International Awards Group’s 2006 Advertising and Marketing Effectiveness (AME) Awards.
The mini-car in question is the Volkswagen Fox, a sporty compact car aimed at youthful, first-time car buyers. The ad campaign, created for Volkswagen AG by DDB Düsseldorf and built around the tagline “Short but Fun,” featured 30-second, animated versions of six international film hits, including Titanic, Jaws and Pulp Fiction. And the bunnies? They took the place of the films’ human characters, adding an element of the outrageously hip to the spots that captivated German audiences during the campaign’s brief, four-day run.
The AME Awards committee, comprised of a multi-cultural and international cross-section of top marketing executives, recognizes integrated marketing campaigns that are fresh, creative and above all, successful.  Campaigns that demonstrate innovative problem solving, and that achieve specific business goals using well-crafted concepts, inspired marketing strategies and an effective combination of traditional and/or alternative media tactics.

Volkswagen’s “Short but Fun” campaign met all these criteria, achieving extraordinary, measurable results for the German car manufacturer that exceeded its campaign objectives and proved it could capture an audience of very critical media users on a very tight production and media budget.

A Clear Objective
Volkswagen introduced the Fox in the spring of 2005 into the price-driven mini-car segment. Despite Volkswagen’s premium image and the Fox being slightly higher priced than the competition, it soon became the market leader.
The launch campaign emphasized the idea that in opting for economy, buyers would not have to compromise quality and reliability. This notion appealed to buyers at all levels, however the next phase of communication would need to sharpen the Fox’s profile among its main target audience: youthful, first time car buyers between the ages of 18-25.

A Moving Target Audience
While highly desirable, this group is the hardest to reach through traditional advertising methods. They have grown up being bombarded by messaging from multiple communication channels and have a very short attention span. If content does not grab them immediately, they turn elsewhere.  DDB faced a formidable challenge in coming up with a strategy to capture their attention and motivate them to action.

Inspired Creative Strategy
“We developed a very creative positioning for the VW Fox: short but fun,” said DDB’s Luis Ramirez.  That’s the message we wanted to communicate: a small car that is fun to drive and does not cost a fortune.  The ideal car for young people.”
The ‘Short but fun” positioning also was developed to differentiate the Fox from its competitors’ cliché lifestyle advertising, which implies that one need only drive a certain car to be more active, attractive and popular. Rather, the ‘Short but fun” messaging conveyed that driving a Fox provides a concentrated, intense form of fun that doesn’t depend on others’ approval; the type of enjoyment that young, upwardly mobile people seek.
In order to illustrate this concept, the agency teamed with artist Jennifer Shiman, whose 30-second, animated versions of cinema classics – starring floppy-eared versions of Hollywood’s A-list – were sure to stop young, media-savvy consumers in their tracks.
“To get this target group excited about the Fox, we created a funny communication platform: http://www.shortbutfun.com,” said Ramirez. “There, site visitors could find a variety of short and fun content, including short films. So we were looking for endlessly long films, told in a very short time.  When we discovered the movies of Jennifer Shiman on the Internet, we realized that they perfectly matched our positioning and had to part of our platform.  We contacted her and discussed a potential cooperation.  She was very excited to work with us. We had to animate and cut the films created by Jennifer so that they matched with the already shot Fox ending. The result: six crazy films, loved by everybody.”
An interesting note: though the commercials appeared only in Germany, they were run in English, in order to speak pointedly to the young target audience.

Innovative Media Strategy
In order to keep media costs down, DDB decided to air the commercials for only four days and make the Internet the main communication channel. This was a risky decision, however the concepts and creative were so strong that DDB felt that viewers would flock to the Fox’s microsite to see more. To ensure that the campaign reached the maximum number of desired audience members, the agency chose a very targeted media strategy, running the commercials on music channels such as MTV, and choosing weekend spots during entertainment shows rather than mid-week spots between shows.
Once on the “Short but fun” web site, viewers could watch all the commercials as movie streams. In order to engage the viewers further, they were asked to rate each commercial. In addition, a banner ad with a link to the Fox product web page was prominently positioned on the home page so that users could learn more about the Fox.

Dazzling Results
The primary, direct communication objective of the “Short but fun” campaign was to generate 20,000 visits to the shortbutfun.com homepage. Within only four days, over 31,000 visits were counted, exceeding the original goal by 56 percent.
The agency also projected the campaign would generate 2,000 email addresses and increase traffic to the Fox product web page by 10 percent.  After four days, over 8,000 users provided their addresses in order to receive more information, and the number of visitors to the web page increased by 37 percent.
Further, qualitative research indicated high recall and positive reactions among viewers, demonstrating that the campaign did indeed achieve its objective of raising the Fox’s profile among young, first time car buyers.

Advertising Agency: DDB Dusseldorf
Creative Director: Jennifer Shinan/Eric Schoeffler
Copywriter: Tim Jacobs
Art Director: Jennifer Shiman/Christian Brenner
Production Company: Angry Alien Productions, Los Angeles
Director: Jennifer Shinan


Stihl (2002/2011) – The Garden of Creativity

Stihl Leaf Blower – BLOW

A man is blowing leaves off the footpath. He accidentally blows his son off his bicycle as he is riding past.
Advertising Agency: FCB Melbourne
Creative Director: Alastair Simpson
Copywriter: Justine Drape
Art Director: Scott Nowell
Year: 2002
Shortlist

Stihl Foliage Trimmer – DROWNING


Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Bertrand Suchet
Copywriter: Jean Gabrielle Causse
Art Director: Pierrette Diaz
Photographer: Nicolas Descottes
Year: 2004

Stihl Foliage Trimmer – PIZZA DELIVERY MAN/SALESMAN/EXPRESS SERVICE





Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris

Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Edouard Perarnaud
Art Director: Martin Darfeuille
Photographer: David Harriman
Year: 2005
Shortlist

Stihl High Powered Blower – DESERT/SNOW/VOLCANO




Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Edouard Perarnaud
Art Director: Martin Darfeuille
Photographer: Corbis
Year: 2005

Stihl Chainsaw – SABRE


Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Edouard Perarnaud
Art Director: Martin Darfeuille
Photographer: Jean Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2005

Stihl Cut-off Saw – EIFFEL TOWER


Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Cèline Landa
Art Director: Benjamin Marchal
Year: 2005
Shortlist

Stihl Garden Tool – LOST CHILD/CAST AWAY



Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Mathieu Elkaim
Art Director: Pierrette Diza
Photographer: Julia Fullertton Batten
Year: 2006

Stihl Chainsaw – BIRD/SNAKE/SLOTH




Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Frederic Sounillac
Art Director: Alexandre Veret
Year: 2006

Stihl Brushcutter – CLOTHESLINE/PING PONG/LETTERBOX


Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris

Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Olivier Apers
Art Director: Hugues Pinguet
Photographer: Klaud Fayol
Year: 2005
Bronze Lion for the campaign

Stihl Gardener Tools – MEMORIES CAMPAIGN





Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Olivier Camensuli
Art Director: Frederic Royer/Yves Sarhadian
Photographer: Arnaud Pyvka
Year: 2006

Stihl Trimmer Range – WOMAN/MAN/BOY

Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Olivier Dermaux
Art Director: Mathieu Vinciguerra
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion for the campaign

Stihl Chainsaw – DON’T SPEND YOUR LIFE AT WORK




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Creative Directors: Olivier Altman/Herve Plumet
Creatives: Mathieu Degryse,/Yves-Eric Deboey
Photographer: Marc Gouby

Stihl Chainsaw – KIDS/CAR



Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Patrice Lucet
Art Director: Charles Guillemant
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2007
Shortlist

Stihl Chainsaw – CHRISTMAS TREE


Advertising Agency: Cumminsnitro, Melbourne
Executive Creative Director: Sean Cummins
Creative Director: James Procter
Copywriter: Julie Polter
Art Director: Dave Lunnie
Photographer: Peter Roberts
Year: 2007
Shortlist

Stihl High Power Blowers – BLOWER



Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Herve Plumet
Copywriter: Morgan Sommet
Art Director: Geoffroy Gozez
Production Company: La Pac, Paris
Director: Herve Plumet
Photographer: Herve Plumet
Year: 2007

Stihl – GRASS ARMY


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Celine Lescure
Art Director: David Aryel
Photographer: Jacques Demarcillac
Year: 2007

Stihl Chainsaw – FIRE


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Patrice Lucet
Art Director: Charles Guillemant
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2007

Stihl Cut-Off Saw – PILLARS/COSTRUCTION/STAIRS




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: George Carreno/Benoit Blunberger
Photographer: Herve Plumet
Year: 2007

Stihl Hedge Trimmer – MAZE


Advertising Agency: Cumminsnitro, Melbourne
Executive Creative Director: Sean Cummins
Creative Director: James Procter
Copywriter: James Procter
Art Director: Dave Lunnie
Photographer: Stuart Crosset
Year: 2008
Shortlist

Stihl Edgers – BROWN DWARF/ORANGE DWARF



Headline: Get your garden back
Advertising Agency: DCS, Porto Alegre Brazil
Executive Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Régis Montagna
Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Régis Montagna
Copywriter: Claudia Tajes
Art Director: João Pedro Vargas
Photographer: Claudio Meneghetti
Year: 2008

Stihl Blower Garden Vacuum – THREE LITTLE PIGS


Advertising Agency: DCS, Porto Alegre Brazil
Executive Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Régis Montagna
Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Régis Montagna
Copywriter: Patrik Matzembacher
Art Director:Andre Pauletti
Year: 2008

Stihl Electric Range – MIXER/HAIRDRYER/HEDGE TRIMMER




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Herve Plumet
Copywriter: Martin Rocaboy
Art Director: Yves Sarhadian
Photographer: Yann Le Pape
Year: 2008

Stihl Tools – CHAINSAW/BLOWER/HEDGE TRIMMER/CLEARING SAW




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Olivier Dermaux
Art Director: Mathieu Vinciguerra
Photographer:Hervè Plumet
Year: 2008

Stihl Gardening Tools – ANVILS/BARBED WIDE FENCE/STONE TREES/WALL





Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Mathieu Degryse
Art Director: Yves Eric Deboey
Photographer: Marc Gouby
Year: 2008

Stihl High Pressure Hose – GRAFFITI


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Mathieu Degryse
Art Director: Yves Eric Deboey
Photographer: Marc Gouby
Year: 2008

Stihl Gardening Tools Guarantee – CHAINSAW/BLOWER/HEDGE TRIMMER/CLEARING SAW






Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Oliver Desmettre/Fabrice Delacourt
Art Director: Nicolas Delille
Photographer: Herve Plumet
Year: 2009
Shortlist

Stihl Chainsaw – BEQUEATHE

For more than 80 years, STIHL have forged a reputation for making outdoor power equipment that doesn’t give up. Their iconic Chainsaws are no exception. Bullet-proof engineering combined with expert servicing means you’ll only ever need one. To demonstrate the incredible lifespan of a STIHL Chainsaw, we portrayed what might happen if it out-lived its owner.
Advertising Agency: DDB New Zealand
Executive Creative Director: Toby Talbot
Copywriter: Simon Vicars
Art Director: James Tucker
Production Company: Robbers Dog Films, Auckland
Director: Adam Stevens
Year: 2009

Stihl Gardening Tools – CARPET/BATH TUB/DISH WASHER/DRY CLEANER’S





Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Thierry Lebec
Art Director: Benedicte Potel
Photographer: Geof Kern
Year: 2009

Stihl Gardening Tools – STRONG


Advertising Agency: DCS, Porto Alegre Brazil
Executive Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Raphael Boher
Copywriter: Everton Behenck
Art Director:Rodrigo Alves
Photographer: Raul Krebs
Year: 2009

Stihl Power Cutters – SHUTTLE


Advertising Agency: FHV BBDO, Amsterdam
Executive Creative Director: Marthen Van De Vijfeijken
Art Director: Bart Bus
Photographer: Jeroen Bijl
Year: 2009

Stihl Gardening Tools – CAR/CHEMISTRY/SHOPPING/BABIES





Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Olivier Camensuli
Art Director: Federic Royer/Yves Sarhadian
Photographer: Herve Plumet
Year: 2009

Stihl Chainsaw – BEDOUIN


Headline: It makes you to saw
Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Charles Guillemant
Art Director: Faustin Claverie
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2010

Stihl – AUTUMN CALENDAR




Insights, Strategy & the Idea
STIHL asked the agency to develop a calendar, which promotes the product range of leaf blowers. The aim was to retain existing and entice new customers.
We didn’t want to create an ordinary calendar covering 365 days. So, we created the first autumn calendar – with a simple but striking idea: the sheets of the calendar fall automatically. Just like the leaves of trees in autumn. This brings autumn right into the offices of potential customers, showing the necessity of STIHL leaf blowers in an entertaining way – day by day.
Creative Execution
In close cooperation with a graduate engineer, we developed something never seen before: the first tear-off calendar that tears off its leaves automatically – introducing the STIHL autumn calendar.
The design remains close to the leaf. Every leaf-like sheet of the calendar has branching veins and is coloured like autumn foliage of the domestic tree world. Because leaves fall in autumn, the STIHL autumn calendar only covers the time period from October 23 to December 21.
Results and Effectiveness
After the first 100 STIHL autumn calendars arrived, STIHL got innumerable requests from key clients. Due to that, STIHL Germany is planning to produce a second batch of 3,500 calendars. And even STIHL International is planning to produce 1,000 pieces. Nevertheless, only six days after the demo-video of the STIHL autumn calendar has shown up on youtube.com, it got well over 160,000 hits, thousands of links to homepages, blogs and tweets.

Advertising Agency: Euro RSCG, Duesseldorf
Creative Directors: Torsten Pollmann/Felix Glauner
Art Directors: Martin Staubach/Kai Tusar/Marie Pielmeier
Copywriters: Christoph Mueller/Till Koester
Year: 2010
Shortlist

Stihl – STOP BOTHERING YOUR NEIGHBOURG CAMPAIGN




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Olivier Dermaux
Art Director: Mathieu Vinciguerra
Photographer: David Harriman
Year: 2010

Stihl Blower – BIRDS


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Patrice Lucet
Art Director: Philippe Boucheron
Photographer: Leo Caillard
Year: 2011
Shortlist

Stihl Chainsaw – WARRIORS




Advertising Agency: Scholz & Friends, Berlin
Executive Creative Director: Matthias Spaetgens
Copywriter: Felix John
Art Director: PhilippeWeber
Year: 2011
Bronze Lion for the campaign

Stihl Box – THE GARDENER


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Chief Creative Officer: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Fabrice Dubois
Art Director: Gérald Schmitte
Production Company: Carnibirds
Director: David Gray
Year: 2011

Stihl – HAPPY CHRISTMAS


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Art Director: Martin Darfeuille
Copywriter: Alexandre Hildebrand
Photographer: Jean Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2011


IKEA: The first IKEA Cinema Catalogue

 We used existing great movies with great actors in which IKEA products are seen accidentally. With a smart and clever trick we directed the people’s attention to the IKEA products. Guerilla promotion teams equipped with powerful portable projectors brought names and prices of IKEA products during the movie on the screen – next to Brad Pitt, George Clooney and other famous actors. This surprising execution fits perfectly to the IKEA principle: surprise the many people with fresh ideas for everybody’s everyday life. After the show we consequently distributed IKEA catalogues in front of the cinema.

Advertising Agency: DDB Berlin

Creative Directors: Tim Stübane, Birgit van den VAlentyn
Art Directors: René Gebhardt, Björn Kernspeckt
ECD: Stefan Schulte
CCO: Amir Kassaei
Graphic: Peter Schönherr, Anke Zink