Titanic in advertising

 Centraal Beheer

Four men transport a heavy box with precious contents to a waiting ship. The box survives lots of dangers and finally arrives safe. Unfortunately the ship is the Titanic.
Advertising Agency: DDB Needham, Netherlands
Year: 1993
Gold Lion

Der Spiegel Magazine


Advertising Agency: Springer & Jacoby
Year: 1998

Gradiente Home Theatre


Advertising Agency: Young & Rubicam, Brazil
Year: 1998

Alka Seltzer


Advertising Agency: BBDO Portugal
Year: 1998

Audi


Advertising Agency: Tandem DDB, Spain
Year: 1999

Titanic Food Festival


Advertising Agency: PSL Erickson, India
Year: 1999

Publicaciones Semana


Advertising Agency: Lowe & Partner, Colombia
Year: 1999

Canal +


Advertising Agency: Equator Belgium
Year: 2000
Shortlist

Priya Village Cinema


Advertising Agency: Contract Advertising, India
Year: 2000

Canal +


Advertising Agency: EURO RSCG BETC, France
Year: 2000

Star Channel

In a scene reminiscent of “Titanic”, the workers in an office try to fix a broken shelf.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Year: 2001

Fisherman’s Friends


Advertising Agency: Springer & Jacoby
Year: 2003

Meio & Mensagem Magazine


Advertising Agency: Neogama BBH, Sao Paulo
Year: 2003

Citroen XSara Picasso


Advertising Agency: Duezt EURO RSCG, Sao Paulo
Year: 2003

 Soken DVD

This series show the problems when you play a DVD player. It then recommends a Soken DVD player instead. The office girl talks to her friend at the elevator about the ‘Titanic’ DVD she saw yesterday. However, she isn’t speaking smoothly. Why? Because her DVD player can’t play smoothly either.
Advertising Agency: EURO RSCG Flagship, Bangkok
Year: 2004
Gold Lion

Sony Wega Home Theatre


Advertising Agency: BBDO Chile
Year: 2004

L’Equipe Sport Magazine


Advertising Agency: DDB Paris
Year: 2005

Dakino Film Festival


Advertising Agency: Lowe & Partners, Romania
Year: 2005


 Volkswagen Fox

A ship, a man, a woman. Ship sinks. Man dead. Woman alive. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Titanic” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.
Advertising Agency: DDB Dusseldorf
Year: 2006
Silver Lion

LG Home Theater


Advertising Agency: Lowe Porta, Chile
Year: 2004

Blockbuster

We see the memorable scene where the Terminator is going to be melted in the industrial plant, everything occurs as normal, but the soundtrack we hear is “My Heart Will Go On” from Titanic. In the credits we read “Terminator or Titanic? Take Both, Tuesdays 2X1 at BlockBuster”
Advertising Agency: BBDO Guatemala
Year: 2006
Shortlist

Panasonic Veira Plasma TV


Advertising Agency: Lowe Porta, Santiago
Year: 2006
Shortlist

History Channel


Advertising Agency: Ogilvy South Africa
Year: 2006

TV Guide


Advertising Agency: Jung von Matt, Germany
Year: 2006

Hyundai


Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume, Brussels
Year: 2006

HENKEL Loctite


Advertising Agency: DDB Milan
Year: 2007

Montex Carbon Paper


Advertising Agency: Percept H, Mumbai
Year: 2007

Utopia Groups Cinema


Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume, Belgium
Year: 2007

McDowell’s Diet Mate Whisky


Advertising Agency: Mudra Communication, Bangalore India
Year: 2007

Spontex


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Year: 2007

L’Express


Advertising Agency: Bambuck, Paris
Year: 2007

Megastar Cineplex


Advertising Agency: Ogilvy & Mather, Vietnam
Year: 2007

TAM Airlines


Advertising Agency: Young & Rubicam Sao Paulo
Year: 2008
Shortlist

Toys ‘R Us


Advertising Agency: Volcano Advertising, South Africa
Year: 2008

Cape Times


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull
Year: 2008

Kaercher (immersion pump)


Advertising Agency: FJR Werbeagentour, Munich
Year: 2009

RIOS Illustration Studios


Advertising Agency: Artplan, Brazil
Year: 2009

Textliner Faber-Castell


Advertising Agency: Young & Rubicam Malaysia
Year: 2009

Show Off Film


Advertising Agency: Fuel Lisbon/Euro RSCG
Year: 2009

Orange Foundation


Advertising Agency: Ignitionk, Madrid
Year: 2009

Rocklets Chocolate Candies

We see the Titanic sailing over the dark waters of the Atlantic Ocean. In the crow’s nest there’s a watchman, personified by a Yellow chocolate Rocklets. Suddenly, he spots a huge iceberg and informs the other Rocklets who desperately trie to alert the Captain. As soon as he takes off to do so, a huge human hand takes it away and eats it. The Rocklet was never able to inform the ship that it is about to crash into an iceberg. Super: The beginning of the history of a Rocklets is very close to the end.
Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett Argentina
Year: 2009

Post-It


Advertising Agency: BBDO Mexico
Year: 2010

Vodafone


Advertising Agency: Scholz & Friends Duesseldorf
Year: 2010

Canal + 


Advertising Agency: BETC EURO RSCG, Paris
Year: 2010

Iffco Financial Service


Advertising Agency: Publicis India
Year: 2010

Mitsubishi


Advertising Agency: BBDO Santiago
Year: 2010


 Melody Enterteinment

The first all Arabic movie channel makes its take on ‘Titanic’.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett Cairo
Year: 2010
Bronze Lion

Ford KA


Advertising Agency: Bassat Ogilvy Group, Madrid
Year: 2011

Washin Bifocal Glasses


Advertising Agency: Grey Tokyo
Year: 2011

Listerine


Advertising Agency: JWT Mumbai
Year: 2011

Braun Silk-Epil


Advertising Agency: Impact BBDO, UAE
Year: 2011


TBWA/Paris for Amnesty International – Death to the Death Penalty (the story behind the campaign)

On October 10 2010, the fourth European Day Against the Death Penalty, Amnesty International France launched a commercial to mobilise support amongst decision-makers and the general public for its campaign against the death penalty.

The film, created for Amnesty International France by advertising agency TBWA Paris, used life-like wax figures to depict four different methods of execution: firing squad, hanging, beheading and the electric chair. In each scenario, the wax figures melt then crumple – powerfully illustrating the campaign’s strap line: ‘Death to the Death Penalty’.

In a chiaroscuro mood, a firing squad is pointing guns to a prisoner. Characters made out candle wax start to melt down. Then, a hangman is just about to knock down the stool of the prisoner but the rope of the Gallows starts melting down and the scene dissolves. The sword of an executioner and the executioner himself melt down. And eventually, an electric chair meets the same fate. As a reveal, the sentence shaped in candle wax “Death to the death penalty” followed by the very own Amnesty candle logo explain us that Amnesty has put a death spell on the death penalty, that it’s own flame is burning down executioners.

French broadcasters agreed to show the ad at no cost to Amnesty International during an initial run of 30 ad slots. The commercial was then shown in independent cinemas across France for a further four weeks and the creative idea featuring wax figures was also used in accompanying print ads – including posters in Paris – and also direct mail.






The ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ campaign generated significant media coverage and interest both in France and further afield. The commercial was viewed more than 400,000 times online with 30,000 views via the Amnesty International France web site. The advertising has since been used by Amnesty international in more than a dozen other countries – an unusual step as the organisation usually commissions then implements its marketing campaigns locally, market by market.

“We were amazed that support for the work among Amnesty International activists was unanimous – which for us is extremely rare,” says Sylvie Haurat, Communications Director of Amnesty International France.

The Story
Although 96 countries have formally abolished it and many more have not used it in years, 58 nations still actively practice the death penalty. Campaigns for all countries to end capital punishment are ongoing, however, and at a General Assembly meeting in November 2010 the United Nations renewed its call for a moratorium on the death penalty. Ahead of this Amnesty International France, part of global human rights organisation Amnesty International, decided to run a publicity campaign about the issue. France was one of the first countries to formally abolish the death penalty. Amnesty International France wanted to remind the French public that 58 countries were yet to follow their country’s lead, and it hoped France would step up its influence to persuade governments yet to abolish the death penalty to do so.

Amnesty International France is one of 72 national ‘sections’ of Amnesty International, the organisation that campaigns for internationally-recognised human rights for all. Typically, it runs campaigns around three or four different human rights-related issues each year with advertising created and then implemented locally, market by market. Budgets are always very tight so much if not all of the creative development and production work involved is done for free with media space either provided pro bono or at a reduced cost.

We are very demanding client,” Sylvie Haurat says. “Not only do we have very little budget, we are extremely demanding when it comes to our concerns about ethics. And with the cross section of activists working for us, who all have strong opinions, it can be difficult to find campaign ideas on which everyone can agree.” 

In early 2009 Amnesty International France approached TBWA-Paris to develop the death penalty campaign. The organisation had worked with the agency for almost a decade on an ad hoc basis – a relationship that had already produced a number of highly successful campaigns – and the brief was clear.

“Amnesty International already has a worldwide initiative called ‘Count Down for a World Free from Capital Punishment’,” explains Anne-Laure Brunner, TBWA-Paris’ Account Director and Director of New Business. “They gave us the historical background and the Count Down context. They made it clear we needed to mobilise support and to do so by being positive about how close they now are to realising their goal. And they told us to make sure that nothing we produced was directly critical of any particular, individual country.”

A significant feature of the brief – and the TBWA-Paris creative team’s starting point – was how different the death penalty brief was to others for previous Amnesty International campaigns. Unlike most of the other issues Amnesty International campaigns on, the death penalty is a fight that’s close to being won. Because of this, Amnesty International France wanted to do something different to most of our other campaigns – to be more positive. “It was about raising awareness,” says Sylvie Haurat. “And we wanted it to be a message that would appeal to everyone.” 

The Strategy
The agency team’s initial discussions focused on different ways to present the death penalty as outdated and irrelevant – building on insight into the varied and often conflicting ways in which it is used in different countries, and the fact that there is little evidence to suggest capital punishment effectively dissuades others from repeating the same crime. The creative team were concerned that imagery such as an electric chair overgrown by nature might lack impact, however. Attention then turned to Amnesty International’s logo, which features the image of a candle signifying hope out of darkness. Their idea was to use figures of executioners made of wax melting.

“The thought of using wax figures came to us quite quickly because the Amnesty International logo stands for light and hope, and because the melting wax would simply show the time was right to make the death penalty simply melt away,” says TBWA-Paris Art Director Philippe Taroux. “We felt this was a positive way to get the message across – with only a final push in the campaign needed to bring it to its end, it was important to be engaging rather than shocking which people might have felt was alienating.”

Though the creative solution was found early executing it would take almost another 18 months, however. “If you don’t have the money to spend you need time,” Taroux adds. “We began by researching how we could film melting, life-size figures for TV. We approached production collective Pleix who we have worked with many times before to see if we could build and film the figures for real then melt them in post-production. But then we realised how difficult it would be to shoot what we wanted for real.”

Early tests showed it would be too difficult to film melting wax without it looking like stop-motion animation. The logistics involved combined with the limited budget available, meanwhile, meant a more cost effective way to do it was needed that look as realistic as shooting it for real.

“We then began working with post-production company Digital District to find a way to create figures using CG that looked life-size and realistic that we could then melt convincingly,” Taroux continues. “It was really hard as nothing like this had been done before and only in the last week could we be sure what we had was good enough. We ended up pushing the software to the limit on what turned out to be one of the most complicated ads I’ve ever done.” 

So, the figures were sculpted in CG then melted using special software. Facial scans were also used to create extra details on the faces. An important balancing act, however, was ensuring that while realistic the figures did not too closely resemble any particular nationality, Brunner points out: “While we wanted the executioners to be realistic they couldn’t look too like one nationality.” 

Creating the texture of the wax was relatively easy compared to simulating realistic melting. CG software is highly effective for quick water splashes but less suitable for melting more viscous substances very slowly. “Everything had to be really precise – which is always the case to get the best out of 3D,” Taroux adds.  “We drew lot of storyboards to know exactly what we wanted in each shot working closely with the director. We then focused closely on the special effects. Editing was about making sure each of the four ‘stories’ had equal weight.” 

Music choice was another important consideration. “The images were critical, but as important was creating the right ‘climate’ through the sound to provide an emotional dimension,” Taroux explains. The track eventually chosen after months of research was a stirring piece of music called ‘Everyday’ by Carly Comando. “We did not want anything that would over-dramatise the subject. The music was chose had to keep the human dimension – to be stirring and hopeful.”  

Amnesty International France was closely involved throughout the extended development and production process.

“This meant a number of lengthy discussions among our executive committee – about the storyboards, for example,” says Sylvie Haurat. “Because one scene they suggested would show an executioner’s face melting. We had lots of discussions about the ethics of whether Amnesty International could be seen to melt an executioner. This might seem bizarre to an outsider but as I say, we are very demanding. But the idea was strong. And the scene with the melting face is still there.”  

The finished film featured four different vignettes, each depicting a different form of execution: beheading by sword, a practice still used in some Middle East countries; firing squad, still used in China; hanging, used in parts of Asia; and electrocution, practise still used in parts of the US. Each vignette was carefully lit and shot against a simple black background with the audience’s viewpoint guided around the different figures and their equipment as the wax models began to melt.

Though the commercial took almost 18 months to produce the client was closely involved throughout the project. “We have a close relationship and so a strong degree of trust,” says Brunner. “There was much talking around the brief and first concepts as nothing had been done like this before. Then there was more talking around the realisation. Ultimately, however, it all turned out well and no modifications by the client to any of our work at all were made.”

The Impact
Amnesty International France’s ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ campaign launched on October 10 2010, the fourth European Day Against the Death Penalty.  With an extremely limited budget, the campaign needed unpaid media coverage to extend its reach. So ahead of launch, the agency produced CDs and press releases about the campaign to distribute to the media along with scaled down wax models of an electric chair. This generated editorial coverage on four major TV shows and in numerous magazines. The commercial was then shown in French independent cinemas over the next four months.

The ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ film went on to have a significant and far-reaching impact. It generated a large amount of interest at home and abroad and, in the months that followed, the French-produced advertising was used by Amnesty International sections in more than a dozen other countries – a highly unusual move for an organisation where individual markets usually produce and use they own campaign materials, locally.

In the months since, the campaign has won more than two dozen advertising industry awards including a D&AD Yellow Pencil in the Animation category in 2011.

“The campaign’s success is down to the emotional power of the subject and the way it was presented which touched people without over-dramatising,” Brunner believes. “The film is positive and motivating. The technology behind it makes it look real. And the use of wax makes a direct link to the Amnesty candle. It is a perfect combination of pictures, music and message.” 

Sylvie Haurat adds: “The strength of the campaign lay in the quality of the creative concept and its symbolic resonance. The length of time it took to make did cause us problems – we had hoped to run the campaign in October 2009 but it wasn’t ready until a year later. But pro bono work is never straight forward. And we were amazed that support for the work among Amnesty International activists was unanimous – which for us is extremely rare.” 

Advertising Agency: TBWA/Paris
Executive Creative Directors: Eric Holden, Rémi Noël
Copy Writer: Benoît Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Director: Pleix
Production Company: Warm & Fuzzy
Composting: Philippe Aubry, Dan Elhadad, Jimmy Cavé, Guillaume Nadaud, Guillaume Martin
Music: Artist/Song Title: Carly Comando – Everyday


TBWA/Paris for MAPA Protective Gloves (2006/2008) – Because hands are creative

MAPA Campaign 2006 – The Stallion/The Bill, please/The Issue/A Bad Hair Day

Creative Director: Erik Vevroegen
Copywriter:  Xavier Smith
Art Director: Bjoern Ruhemann, Joakim Reveman
Photographer: Hans Stark
Gold Lion for the campaign

MAPA Campaign 2007 – Birdy Num Num/Just a Little Prick/Doctor Doctor

Creative Director: Erik Vevroegen
Copywriter:  Xavier Smith
Art Director: Bjoern Ruhemann, Joakim Reveman, Jonathan Santana
Photographer: Swen Glage
Shortlist

MAPA 2008 – Sex Education


Creative Director: Erik Vevroegen
Copywriter:  Xavier Smith
Art Director: Jonathan Santana
Photographer: Swen Glage


TBWA/Paris for Playstation (2003/2007) – Five years of amazing works

TITLE: Rebirth
The print work called “Rebirth” that shows the head of a grown man emerging from the womb of a svelte model has won the International Advertising Festival’s Press & Poster Grand Prix award as the year’s best print ad. “Rebirth” was originally selected as the winner in the outdoor category in Monday’s Press and Poster jury deliberations but was then switched to print after the original print winner was disqualified.
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: Jorge Carreno
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2003
Grand Prix in Press Lions

TITLE: Veteran
The ad campaign titled “Veterans”  depicts the boys with otherworldly looks who have gone through untold battles, blood and death.
“The success of the PlayStation shots depends on a subtle blend of lighting, tone and the expressions on the faces of the players… when Jorge Carreno, the art director at TBWA\Paris, approached me with the idea of war veterans that were actually kids, I knew it could be something special. Good ideas bring out your best work.” – Marc Gouby, photographer
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: Jorge Carreno
Photographer: Marc Gouby
Year: 2003
Silver Lion for the campaign

TITLE: Supermarket

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: Jorge Carreno
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2003
Bronze Lion

TITLE: Doll

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Gold Lion

TITLE: Potato Head

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Manoelle Van Der Vaeren
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Gold Lion

TITLE: Dressing up

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Shortlist

TITLE: Kamasutra

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Estelle Nollet
Art Director: Loic Cardon
Artist: Richard N’go
Year: 2004
Bronze Lion

TITLE: Heart of Stone

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Shortlist

TITLE: Skin Shell

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Shortlist

TITLE: Choice

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eve Roussou/Oliver Renaud
Art Director: Eve Roussou/Oliver Renaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Shortlist

TITLE: Adultery
“I can’t even remember how many layers there were in this image. The final file was about 3GB,” says the photographer. He adds, “When using a digital camera you have to shoot quite flat, then increase the contrast in Photoshop.” – Dimitri Daniloff, photographer
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Moulds

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Manoelle Van Der Vaeren
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Plugs

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Matthew Branning
Art Director: Chris Garbut
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Scars

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Baby

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Xander Smith
Art Director: Javier Rodriguez
Photographer: Yann Robert
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Sleeping Beauty

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Photographer: Eugenio Recuenco
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Banana

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Alain Jalabert
Art Director: Thierry Buriez
Photographer: Vincent Dixon
Year: 2005
Shortlist

TITLE: Octopus

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Shortlist

TITLE: Death

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Photographer: Marjolijn de Groot
Year: 2005
Shortlist

TITLE: Head
The fantastic and virtual universe of Playstation is revealed to readers by giving them a glimpse into what exactly goes on inside a player’s head.
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Sebastien Vacherot/Jessica Jerard- Huet/Loic Cardon/Ingrid Varetz
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot/Jessica Jerard- Huet/Loic Cardon/Ingrid Varetz
Photographer: Yann Robert
Production Company: DEF 2 Shoot, Paris
Director: Thomas Marque
Year: 2006
Gold Lion for the press

TITLE: Spring

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Daniel Perez/Xander Smith/Matthew Branning
Art Director: Eve Roussou/Emmanuel Courteau/Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Marc de Cunha Lopez
Year: 2006
Shorlist

TITLE: Bodies

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Ghislaine de Germon
Art Director: Mariene Fonferrier
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2006
Shorlist

TITLE: Panties


Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Xander Smith
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Photographer: Hans Starck
Year: 2006
Shortlist

TITLE: Flasher

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2006

TITLE: Insect

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Veronique Sels
Art Director: Eve Roussou/Viken Guzel
Photographer: Matthieu Deluc
Year: 2007

TITLE: Clown

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Graphic Designer: Thomas Mangold
Year: 2007


Amora Hot Ketchup – Martian/Parade/Spider



Advertising Agency: TBWA/PARIS

Executive Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Matthew Branning/Estelle Nollet
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman/Nicolas Hurez/Caroline Khelif
Production Company: Big Fish Film, Berlin
Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman


Erik Vervroegen for AIDES

2005 – Vibrators – Gold Lion 

We start with a long shot zooming into a suburban home. A young girl looks out the window, hoping to build friendships with the boys playing football in the yard. She’s rejected. Perhaps the skateboarders? No joy. Now she’s years older, a teenager walking through the park ready to throw away her rag doll. The boys are now only too ready to gather around with lust in their minds. She chooses the one with love in his heart. But before they go any further he’s presented with a condom. He’s not happy. More years pass and she’s on the back of a scooter with a love-tattooed boyfriend. They perform sexual acrobatics, but the evidence shows condoms are in use. She presents him her heart but he snuffs it out with his cigarette. More boyfriends come along – a romantic turns into a sadist. A skiier fades out in boredom. An afro-wearing lover turn out to be just too large. At the moment of despair, on the edge of the bridge, comes Mr Right, perhaps at a similar point of vulnerability. The couple become bride and groom. We pan out to the home in the suburbs. The final message: Live Long Enough to find the right one. AIDES. Protect Yourself.

Advertising Agency:  TBWA\PARIS, Boulogne-Billancourt
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Veronique Sels/Erik Vervroegen
Art Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Production Company: Wanda Productions
Music/Artist: Vibrators/Baby Baby

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2006 – Sugar Baby Love – Silver Lion and Bronze Lion for the Outdoor Campaign

The animated journey of a young boys life through his sexuality are shown, from being the odd boy at school, to his first gay love, where he is rejected, and he goes from one bad relationship to another, until he is beaten by by homophobics, and while in hospital meets his true love in the shape of his doctor. After a series of dating catastrophes, he finally meets the man of his dreams. TAG: Live long enough to find the right one. Protect yourself.

Advertising Agency:  TBWA\PARIS, Boulogne-Billancourt
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Veronique Sels
Art Director:  Eve Roussou
Production Company: Wanda Productions
Director: Wilfried Brimo
Music/Artist: Les Rubettes/Sugar Baby Love


Advertising Agency:  TBWA\PARIS, Boulogne-Billancourt
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Veronique Sels
Art Director:  Ingrid Varetz

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2007– Love Story – Shortlist Film Lion

A book opens to tell the sexual encounters of a young man: from the joys of Kamasutra to partner swapping, from brothels to S&M fantasies… On the back cover of the book, a tagline appears: “Whatever you’re into, protect yourself.”
Advertising Agency:  TBWA\PARIS, Boulogne-Billancourt
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Veronique Sels
Art Director:  Eve Roussou
Production Company: Wanda Productions
Director: Wilfried Brimo




Advertising Agency:  TBWA\PARIS, Boulogne-Billancourt
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Jean Francois Bouchet
Art Director:  Jessica Gerard-Huet/Eve Roussou
Typographer: Aisk One

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2008 – Boy/Girl – 2 Bronze Lions for the Press and Outdoor Campaign


A young man flies through a galaxy of breasts, lips, labia, legs, buttocks, tongues and blow up dolls.


Protected by a condom, a young woman swims through a sea of penis and tongue shaped sea creatures. It would be interesting to see how women responded to the commercial, considering the dominance of the penis, to the exclusion of almost all other body parts.

Advertising Agency:  TBWA\PARIS, Boulogne-Billancourt
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Xander Smith
Art Director:  Jonathan Santana
Typographer: James Jean
Production Company: La Pac
Animation/VFX Girl: Minivegas
Animation/VFX Boy: MPC & Minivegas
Director: Minivegas
Music: Future Perfect

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2010 – Graffiti – Cyber: 2 Gold Lions and 1 Bronze Lion/Film: Bronze Lion/Shortlist Grand Prix for Good

AIDES is the leading association fighting against aids in France, leading the way in all the battles for that matter: discrimination, tolerance and open-mindedness.
Despite preventive actions on the field, massive communication remains essential. Graffiti, the new TVC from the agency, has already taken up the challenge with almost 3 million spontaneous views on youtube.
Assertive yet hilarious, Graffiti delivers the message in the most efficient manner…
This TVC celebrates happy sex… as long as it is safe.
It’s also a reminder that condoms can be seen as an appealing asset !
More stuff are to be released in the next months to keep building the world of Willy the graffiti… talk soon then !

Advertising Agency:  TBWA\PARIS, Boulogne-Billancourt
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Holden/Remi Noel
Copywriter:  Ingrid Varetz
Art Director:  Ingrid Varetz
Production Company: Wanda Production
Director: Yoann Lemoine

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2011 – Smutley – Shortlist in Film Lions

CHALLENGE: To de-dramatize the somewhat embarrassing, if not plain awkward, moment when “rubber protection” needs to be discussed. SOLUTION: Smutley. He does not discriminate. Smutley will have unprotected sex with anything on two legs, four hooves or a couple of flippers if the situation arises. But he’s only able to do this because he’s a cat with nine lives. The rest of us need to protect ourselves with condoms. Smutley’s hedonistic and dirty perversions have been paired with a 1920s black-and-white animation style. The juxtaposition between this basic style, the story and the music is both unexpected and engaging – it puts a smile on your face while reminding you to do the right thing.

Advertising Agency: Goodby Silverstein & Partner, San Francisco
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Eric Boyd
Art Director:  Andre Massis
Typographer: James Jean
Production Company: Passion Picture, London
Animation/VFX Girl: Minivegas
Animation/VFX Boy: MPC & Minivegas
Director: Niklas Rissler/Kevin Grady
Music: Bad Reputation/Joan Jett

2011 – Welcome to the World of Sex – Silver in Print Category at the 2011 Clio Awards







“Welcome to the World of Sex”, promoting safe sex, awareness and behavioural changes through innovative and provocative imagery. London illustrator Rod Hunt has designed a NSFW Sex Theme Park map with the tagline “The safer you play, the longer you stay”, taking a humorous and revealing approach to the world of human sexuality and safe sex. “The World of Sex is full of both pleasure and risk. Protect yourself from HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases by always wearing a condom”.

Advertising Agency: Goodby Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco
Executive Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Associate Creative Director/Copywriter: Spencer Riviera
Associate Creative Director/Art Director: Nick Spahr
Art Director: Chris Valencius
Artist: Rod Hunt

2011 – Willy The Tourist

Introducing Willy, the tourist with a lot of frequent-flier miles. Indefatigable and cute, he is a good reminder for all of us to stay safe.

Advertising Agency: Goodby Silverstein & Partner, San Francisco
Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Will Elliot
Art Director:  Antonio Marcato/Raphael Milczarek
Production Company: Seagulls Fly
Director: Luciana Jordao

2011 – Charlie, Swamp, S&M, Monkey, Castle





Advertising Agency: Goodby Silverstein & Partner, San Francisco

Executive Creative Director:  Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter:  Nathaniel Lawlor, Will Elliot, Icaro Doria
Art Director:  Adrien Bindi, Antonio Marcato, Raphael Milczarek, Andre Massis
Artist: Andy Ward, Cristiano Siqueira, Mike Kazaleh, Nathan Fox