Silent Film Festival’s Trailers – The World First Instagram Film Experience

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The Toronto Silent Film Festival has taken to another new-media platform to promote its upcoming event. The festival has set up three Instagram accounts, which each contain “trailers” for silent movies. There’s tsff_1, which showcases Murnau’s classic Sunrise: A Song of Two Humanstsff_2, featuring an excerpt from the 1925 feature Tumbleweeds; and tsff_3, taken from the Del Lord short Super-Hooper-Dyne Lizzies. To view each trailer, head to the relevant Instagram account on your smartphone and scroll rapidly though the images to create a flip book-like effect.

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The idea for the novel advertising method came from Canadian advertising agency Cossette, which explained its thinking behind the campaign to Creative Review: “It feels appropriate to be using a technology like Instagram to promote the silent film technique,” says co-chief creative officer Matt Litzinger, explaining that silent film was “in its day.. every bit as ground-breaking and innovative as digital platforms are today.”

Agency: Cossette
Co-CCOs, Creative Directors: Matthew Litzinger, David Daga
Copywriter: Sebastian Lyman
Art Director: Pepe Bratanov
Year: 2013


Droga Give Me 5 (from Underground Creative School, Buenos Aires)

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They are a group of 25 digital creative students of Underground, a creative school in Buenos Aires. All of them wanted to accomplish our studies and get a job but with such a huge competitive scenario we needed to find somehow, a way to stand out. That´s how they came out with an idea: they had to work for the best creative in the world. If they could get his attention we would be able to get anyone’s.

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Advertising School: Underground Creative School, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Creative Director: Diego Rubio
Creatives: María Paula Castaño Cadena, Lucas Kraglievich, Sandra Lopez, Josefina Salgado, Laura Perez Millan, Camilo Rodríguez, Fede Green, Jorge Anastasiu, Sebastian Merino Luque, Jaime Vanegas Restrepo, Mario Anchorena Aitken, Jorge Garcia, Oscar Andrés Rincón, Maye Duarte, Nau Pintos, Manuel Torres Gere, Felipe Arenas, Angela Binimelis, Aye Piru, Andrea Saturno, Bruno Waldbaum, Nat Os, Leandro Baca, César Bené Guerrero
Photographer: Martín Levi


Reason Magazine – 40,000 Readers on a Cover

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“This represents an unprecedented experiment in hiper-individualizing a commercial print publication”
Nick Gillespie, Editor-in-Chief of Reason, in the June 2004 issue

Monthly libertarian magazine Reason pulled off the ultimate in customized publishing when its 40.000 subscribers received their June 2004 copy with a satellite photo of their own neighbourhood on the cover and their house circled in red. On the back cover readers found adverts customized to them and their neighbourhood. The stunt accompanied the magazine’s cover article about the power and importance of databases to customize information.

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When the 40,000 subscribers to Reason, the monthly libertarian magazine, receive a copy of the June issue, they will see on the cover a satellite photo of a neighborhood – their own neighborhood. And their house will be graphically circled.

On one level, the project, sort of the ultimate in customized publishing, is unsurprising: of course a magazine knows where its subscribers live. But it is still a remarkable demonstration of the growing number of ways databases can be harnessed. Apart from the cover image, several advertisements are customized to reflect the recipient’s particulars.

Nick Gillespie, editor in chief of Reason, said the magazine, with an editorial mission of “Free Minds, Free Markets,” used the stunt to illustrate the cover article about the power and importance of databases.

“Our story is man bites dog,” Mr. Gillespie said. “Everybody, including our magazine, has been harping on the erosion of privacy and the fears of a database nation. It is a totally legit fear. But they make our lives unbelievably easier as well, in terms of commercial transactions, credit, you name it.”

Rodger Cosgrove, president of Entremedia, a direct marketing firm and a member of Reason’s board, assisted in coming up with a program that allows the subscriber list to be integrated with satellite photographs. He also worked with Xeikon, the manufacturer of the printer that made the endless customization possible.

“They were interested in showing what this technology could do,” he said, “and we were interested in demonstrating the power of databases to customize information.”

The cover article, written by Declan McCullagh, suggests that while databases can lead to breaches in privacy, it allows Dell to provide instant credit to computer buyers, grocery stores to stock goods that their customers want, and mortgage lenders to keep their rates down.

“It’s obvious that databases provide enormous benefits to modern life,” said Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. “We could no more operate without computer databases than we could without electricity.”

“That doesn’t mean that there aren’t still some serious debates to have about government databases,” he added, “including the monitoring of the general American public under John Poindexter’s Total Information Awareness program and the passenger profiling that has gone on.”

In some respects, Reason’s cover stunt is less Big Brother than one more demonstration that micromarketing is here to stay. “My son gets sports catalogs where his name is imprinted on the jerseys that are on the cover,” Mr. Rotenberg said. “He thinks that’s very cool.”

In his editor’s note describing the magazine’s database package, Mr. Gillispie left open three spots – commuting time, educational attainment and percentage of children living with grandparents – so he could adapt his message to individual readers. Mr. Gillespie said that the parlor trick could have profound implications as database and printing capabilities grow.

“What if you received a magazine that only had stories and ads that you were interested in and pertained to you?” he asked. “That would be a magazine that everyone would want to read.” 

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Agency: Entremedia, USA
Year: 2004


Scholz & Friends for Fresh’N’Friends – Fruit Figures

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All adults know: healthy eating is important. The organic supermarket chain Fresh`N´Friends benefits from that situation. There is just one small problem: kids hate healthy food but they love sweets. Actually, that´s even a big problem. In Germany every fifth child is overweight. “Instead of calling attention to that problem with a traditional ad campaign we chose to solve the problem.”

The solution was a new product: fruit figures. “To make fruits as appealing as sweets for kids we designed fruit arrangements that suit children. Boring fruits were designed in shape of teddy bears, kittens, flowers – all the things kids love.” Just like ordinary fruit salads the fruit figures were sealed, put in a tray and sold in Fresh´N´Friends stores. 

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Additionally, they were promoted with advertising specifically targeted at parents and their kids – direct mailings, email newsletters and posters. In order to involve the kids directly in the campaign a contest was started. We placed cut-out sheets in every package. So the kids could make their own fruit figures by hand. They also could design them digitally on the Fresh`N´Friends website. All ideas were published and judged online. The figure with the most votes was added to the product range. Over 3,500 designs from children were submitted. The rabbit figure of five-year-old Dario got the most votes and was therefore added to the product range.

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Advertising Agency: Scholz & Friends, Berlin, Germany
Creative Director: Martin Pross, Matthias Spaetgens, Wolf Schneider, Mathias Rebmann, Florian Schwalme
Art Director: Alexander Doepel, Sandra Krebs, Bjoern Kernspeckt, René Gebhardt, Loic Sattler, Jinhi Kim
Photographer: Attila Hartwig
Graphics: Peter Schoenherr, Simon Rossow
Year: 2012


Air France/Music in the Sky – The Sky Has Something to Say

Air France Music is known and renowned for its exclusive musical selections. As suitable for an airline company, they are now inviting music lovers to turn their heads towards the sky with the new iPhone application “Music in the Sky”, designed by its agency BETC.

The principle is both poetic and fun: exclusive tunes are hidden in the clouds and all you have to do is catch them by lifting your iPhone, which automatically adds them to your playlist. Anyone with an iPhone can use the app, but travelling passengers will also have the privilege of discovering new tracks depending on where they are in the world: from Paris to Tokyo to Buenos Aires, the sky will hide its own music.

For the first time, thanks to the application, Air France Music fans will be able to listen to the “on air” selections played on board the planes also on terra firma. To celebrate the launch, unreleased tracks from François & the Atlas Mountains, Eugene McGuinness, Villagers, Melody’s Echo Chamber and Tomorrow’s World will be revealed. Finally, throughout the year, Air France Music will organise competitions in the app with the chance to win unreleased tracks, concert tickets or even plane tickets. The Air France Music application can be downloaded free in the Apple Store.

Advertising Agency: BETC
Creative Director: Florence Bellisson
Art Director: Sebastien Partika, Esteban Lebour, Alexandre Saad
Copywriter: Edouard olhagaray, Guillaume Rebbot
Web Designer: Bernard Quarante
Year: 2012


BETC Euro RSCG for Sci Fi Channel – Adopt Sci Fi (Integrated Campaign)

In 2008 BETC Euro RSCG created this integrated campaign, which incorporated ambient, radio, press, film and on-line elements, to raise awareness of the Sci Fi Channel in France. The campaign was based around ten alien “children” toys that were placed in different locations acros eight French cities. Fans were then encouraged to search for them by following clues found on a website and in radio ads. Posters were also displayed around towns to advertise the website. The intention was to create an emotional link between the Brand and people who were not already fans of science fiction. Each alien found earned its rescuer a reward of 500 euros. When nine of the figures had been located it was revealed that the tenth had been placed in an orphanage, where it could be interacted with via a website and a page on Facebook.

The treasure hunt apect of the campaign appealed to fans of the Sci Fi Channel, while also attracting new viewers to the brand.


Advertising Agency: BETC Euro RSCG, Paris
Year: 2008


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