15 Most Insightful Call for Entries Ads

1 – ADC-UA Awards (Ukraine)/Agency: Leo Burnett Ukraine

2 – The 2002 Marketing Awards/Agency: Taxi Canadamarketing-awards-hack-small-18780

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3 – Art Director’s Club CdF 2006/Photographer Vincent Dixon

4 – The Art Directors Club CfE 2002/Bozell New York

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5 – The Singapore Creative Circle Awards 1997/Leo Burnett Singapore

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6 – Creative Club of Belgium (Call for entry 2005)/Agency: Duval Guilarme, Brussels

7 – The KBP Radio Awards, C.f.E 2007/Agency: BBDO Guerrera Ortega, Philippines

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8 – The Art Director’s Club CdF 2009/Agency: Publicis New York

9 – Clio Awards 2004/Agency: ALMAP/BBDO

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10 – The Art Director’s Club Cdf 2011/Agency: DDB New York

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11 – Crèa Awards 2007/Agency: BOS, Canada

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12 – The One Club Call for Entries 2007/Agency: Jupiter Drawing Room, South Africa

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13 – AdAwards Call for Entries 2006/Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, Paris

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14 – ADC 92° Annual Awards/Agency: The Conquistadors Collective, New York

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15 – The Tinta Awards Call for Entries 2012/Agency: Young & Rubicam Philippines

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Silent Film Festival’s Trailers – The World First Instagram Film Experience

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The Toronto Silent Film Festival has taken to another new-media platform to promote its upcoming event. The festival has set up three Instagram accounts, which each contain “trailers” for silent movies. There’s tsff_1, which showcases Murnau’s classic Sunrise: A Song of Two Humanstsff_2, featuring an excerpt from the 1925 feature Tumbleweeds; and tsff_3, taken from the Del Lord short Super-Hooper-Dyne Lizzies. To view each trailer, head to the relevant Instagram account on your smartphone and scroll rapidly though the images to create a flip book-like effect.

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The idea for the novel advertising method came from Canadian advertising agency Cossette, which explained its thinking behind the campaign to Creative Review: “It feels appropriate to be using a technology like Instagram to promote the silent film technique,” says co-chief creative officer Matt Litzinger, explaining that silent film was “in its day.. every bit as ground-breaking and innovative as digital platforms are today.”

Agency: Cossette
Co-CCOs, Creative Directors: Matthew Litzinger, David Daga
Copywriter: Sebastian Lyman
Art Director: Pepe Bratanov
Year: 2013


McDonald’s Canada – Our Food. Your Questions.

After fielding roughly 6,000 questions online about its food, McDonald’s Canada is taking the conversation “offline” with a new advertising campaign.

In June, McDonald’s Canada launched an interactive digital platform, “Our Food. Your Questions.” in an effort to be more transparent with consumers about where its food comes from and how it’s made. Consumers asked everything from calorie counts of certain menu items to why McDonald’s burgers and fries don’t rot when left out for a long period of time.

McDonald’s has now launched an integrated advertising campaign to reach even more Canadians and invite them to join the conversation online.

“The initial success of the program is a real testament to the power of creating meaningful and open dialogue with customers,” said Joel Yashinsky, chief marketing officer at McDonald’s Canada. “This level of transparency has resonated with our guests and has created the type of conversation we want to have with them about our food. We’re excited to see how far it can go.”

The campaign from Tribal DDB Toronto includes television, digital and various outdoor media. Since its inception the company’s response team has covered almost 6,000 questions at the site.  Answers have been posted using text, photos and video.

“The program exceeded all our expectations and we learned from customer feedback that this is an important opportunity for us to continue and evolve the dialogue with our customers,” said Joel Yashinsky, chief marketing officer at Toronto-based McDonald’s Canada. “We wanted to broaden it so that the reach allowed all customers in Canada to be aware of the program and ask any questions they had about our food.”

The TV spot shows questions from the website with behind-the-scenes shots from McDonald’s operations, for example a burger getting prepped for a photo shoot after the question, “Why does your food look different in the advertising than what’s in store?” Meanwhile, video projections on buildings in urban centres will feature select questions and answers–some still and some full-motion with answers that were done on video. “It will [give] a surprise to people in those areas to see the projection of these questions that are very provocative and raise the awareness of the program,” said Yashinsky. Yashinsky said the platform “is going to run forever… We think this is a great two-way conversation for us to have with our customers that we don’t want to end.”

How McDonald’s Canada Makes their World Famous Fries

Did you know that McDonald’s World Famous Fries are made from whole potatoes harvested mainly from farms in New Brunswick, Alberta, and Manitoba? Watch and see exactly how our fries get made, from the farm to the fryer.

“What is in the sauce that is in the Big Mac?”

Christine H. from Oshawa asked, “What is in the sauce that is in the Big Mac?”

Where McDonald’s Canada Gets Our Hamburger Patties From

You’ve probably heard that every McDonald’s Canada hamburger patty is made with 100% pure Canadian beef. But what does that really mean? To find out, we visited Cargill’s processing plant in northern Alberta to give you an all-access look at exactly what our hamburger patties are made from and how they get made.

“Why don’t you guys grill the patties? Better than microwaves!”

“Why don’t you guys grill the patties? Better than microwaves!” Jeffry B. from Oshawa asked. McDonald’s Canada Manager of National Operations Drew Sadler answered.

Is 100% pure beef the name of a company?

“Is your beef actually 100% pure beef or is that just the name of the company?” That’s what John R., from Toronto asked. Our answer: a corporate title search to see if the company actually exists.

Behind the scenes at a McDonald’s photo shoot

Isabel M from Toronto asked “Why does your food look different in the advertising than what is in the store?”

The McNugget under the microscope

Sheri N. from Saskatoon asked, “Is the thing about the Chicken McNuggets true? They are made from a processed pink sludge of meat and bones ground up with chemicals?”

Real Egg Crackdown

“Does your Egg McMuffin use real eggs? They look to perfect” To answer this question our Crew Members were brought in to prove that McDonald’s® Canada uses real freshly cracked Canada Grade A eggs so often, they’ve got skills.

“Why is the food at McDonald’s so cheap?”

“Why is the food at mcdonalds so cheap?” Joanne S., from Toronto asked. McDonald’s Canada President and CEO John Betts answered.

Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB, Toronto, Canada
Creative Director: Louis-Philippe Tremblay
Copywriter:Ryan Lawrence
Art Director:Benson Ngo
Agency Producer: Melanie Lambertsen
Account Director: Miles Savage
Production Company: Family Style
Directors: John Weyman, Torey Kohara
Line Producer: Liz Dussault
Post-Production Company: School – Various
Editor: School – Various
Audio House: RNW
Talent: Real People (McDonald’s Employees, suppliers)


Coca-Cola Happiness Truck around the World – Where Will Happiness Strike Next?

Inspired by the vending machine that dispensed Coca-Cola and other “doses of happiness” on a college campus in New York and quickly became a global viral video sensation; a specially rigged Coca-Cola delivery truck took to the streets of  Rio de Janeiro recently to spread refreshment and smiles to passers-by.

All the action is captured in a two-and-a-half-minute film. In the video, several unsuspecting Brazilians push a button on the back of the truck to dispense Coca-Cola and other fun items such as soccer balls, surfboards and sunglasses.

“‘Happiness Machine’ connected with so many people because the emotion was authentic, unscripted and contagious,” said A.J. Brustein, Global Senior Brand Manager, Coca-Cola. “We wanted to inspire that same feeling again by creating something consumers would respond to and want to share with others because it put a smile on their face.” 

Happiness Truck is one of many videos that can be found on the Facebook hub for “Where Will Happiness Strike Next?”. The hub features more than 25 films from around the world that have been created by local Coca-Cola teams to continue the theme of the award-winning “Happiness Machine,” which has generated more than 3 million online views. The interactive site lets consumers search for videos by country and even vote for where they’d like to see happiness strike next.

“We weren’t trying to replace ‘Happiness Machine’ with the ‘Happiness Truck,'” said Christy Amador, Digital Marketing Manager, Global Content Excellence.  “We wanted to build on this great idea and continue to answer the question, ‘Where Will Happiness Strike Next?’ by  spreading a message of happiness around the globe. These videos from markets all over the world help us to do just that.”

Two of the new films on the hub include a version of “Happiness Truck” filmed in the Philippines and “Happiness Store,” where convenience store customers in Rio are surprised with confetti, lights, live music and more upon grabbing a Coca-Cola from the cooler. “Happiness Machine” – which cost very little to produce – proved that we don’t need to spend millions to produce winning creative, and that great ideas and content can be sourced from anywhere.

 

Happiness Truck in Rio De Janeiro

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Where will happiness strike next?

Happiness Truck in Canada

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Toronto, Vancouver & Montreal, Canada. After a full day of sharing happiness, the experience culminated in a 3-city simultaneous musical celebration featuring Kardinal Offishall in Toronto, These Kids Wear Crowns in Vancouver & Duke Squad in Montreal, to celebrate Coca-Cola’s 125th Anniversary. Where will happiness strike next?

Happiness Truck in Philippines

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Marikina, Philippines. Where will happiness strike next?

Happiness Truck in Kenya

Happiness Truck in Malaysia

The town with a population of over 150,000 kicked off its evening with a surprise from Coca-Cola’s Semangat Truck. What a nice prelude to dinner.

Happiness Truck in Venezuela

Happiness Truck in Ecuador

Happiness Truck in India

Happiness Truck in Russia (CHRISTMAS Edition)

Happiness Truck in France (UEFA Edition and OLYMPIC Edition)

Happiness Truck in Honduras

Happiness Truck in Turkey

Happiness Truck in Naples (COKE & MEALS Edition)

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is transformed into a happiness table in a small square in Naples. Famous chef Simone Rugiati is on a mission asking people
to eat together delivering “doses” of happiness through a magic food cloche.

Happiness Truck/The Cheering Truck in Argentina (FOOTBALL Edition)

This time, Coca-Cola outfitted a special red truck with a recording booth and has been travelling around Argentina collecting the cheers of football (or soccer depending on where you are from) fans to support the Argentinean team. Fans are encouraged to record their cheer to be heard by millions.

The truck drove through 19 different provinces in Argentina as it collected the cheer of over a million different voices. On the day of the match, the Coca-Cola Cheering Truck drove into a stadium that only had room for 50 thousand fans and played the recordings of over a million fans chanting and cheering for the team. Way to rally the troop Coca-Cola!

Coca-cola has been doing some really creative marketing campaigns that have utilized a traveling truck concept (see The Happiness Truck). It’s their way of spreading happiness throughout the world…not to mention strengthening their brand!

Happiness Truck in Hong Kong (TRANSFORMERS Edition)

Happiness Truck in Mongolia

Happiness Truck in Nederland

Happiness Truck in Poland (Euro 2012 Edition)

Happiness Truck in Azerbaijan

Where will happiness strike next? Of course in Baku, Azerbaijan. A Coca-Cola delivery truck has been converted to a happiness machine, which rides through Baku streets and shares the 125 year old happiness with Azeri people.

Happiness Truck in Ucraine

Happiness Truck in Egypt (RAMADAN Edition)

Coca-Cola Egypt gives people more reasons to believe using its Happiness Truck to spread happiness and joy in Cairo making Ramadan 2011 better for all Egyptians.

Happiness Truck in Mexico


Lowe Roche for Pfaff Auto – The First Instant Direct Mail

With a camera, laptop, printer and Porsche, Lowe Roche created the first instant direct mail piece for Pfaff Auto, Toronto.

Usually, when someone sneaks up to a rich guy’s house and drives off with a Porsche, it’s a reason to call the police. This time, it might be a reason to call an auto dealership. In a clever spin on direct mail for Toronto’s Pfaff Automotive, Canadian agency Lowe Roche photographed one of the dealership’s Porsches in the driveways of affluent homes, then used each image to create an ad left at the home where it was shot. The headline: “It’s closer than you think.” The result, according to the agency’s case study video below, was a 32 percent response rate to a site where recipients could schedule a test drive. Direct mail is typically about hitting as many people as possible for as low a cost as possible, but this creative idea shows that for luxury brands, a smaller effort can sometimes go a long way.

Advertising Agency: Lowe Roche, Toronto, Canada
Creative Directors: Dave Douglass, Pete Breton
Art Director: JP Gravina
Copywriter: Simon Craig
Video Production: Motion Pantry
Director / Cameraman / Editor: Dean Vargas
Year: 2012


Cundari Toronto for BMW – The Viral side of BMW

BMW 1M – Walls

BMW Canada presents: the 1 Series M Coupe versus concrete walls. As stunt driving goes, this is some seriously bad-ass stuff. “Walls” is a web film featuring custom made concrete walls and precision driving. Filming was shot on a closed track so don’t even think about trying this on the motorway!

Advertising Agency: Cundari Toronto
Chief Creative Officer: Brent Choi
Copywriter: Brian Murray
Associate Creative Director/Art director: Raul Garcia
Production Company: Bandito Brothers, L.A.
Director/Driver: Mike Mouse McCoys
Year: 2011

BMW 1M – Helipad

Following high-speed skids through car-shaped gaps in thick (supposedly) concrete walls, BMW Canada presents more insane stunt driving to promote its 1 Series M Coupe. Now, the brand wants to flip the bird at mortality by spinning doughnuts on the world’s highest rooftop helipad. The only problem: It’s not clear that the feat is actually real. “I can tell you that the intent right from the beginning was to create videos that were so amazing, people had to debate how we did it.” says Ad agency Cundari’s chief creative officer, Brent Choi. He then referred us to the client, who has yet to reply. Choi sheds some light on the driver, who worked on movies like The Fast and the Furious and The Bourne Identity. Odds seem decent that both videos aren’t quite what they appear—and therefore much less death-defying and much less insane.

Advertising Agency: Cundari Toronto
Chief Creative Officer: Brent Choi
Copywriter: Brian Murray
Associate Creative Director/Art director: Raul Garcia
Production Company: Bandito Brothers, L.A.
Director/Driver: Mike Mouse McCoys
Year: 2011
Shortlist

BMW M5 – Bullet

The new BMW M5 isn’t just really fast—it’s pretty, too. In “Bullet,” a new two-minute ad from agency Cundari BMW Canada, the new model is touted as the world’s fastest sedan. The concept is simple: The car revs its engines in a long tunnel—constructed to look like the barrel of a gun—before shooting out into the desert, shattering a series of giant props including a glass apple, water balloons and a bull’s-eye, in slow-motion “bullet time.”

The brand calls it “High Performance Art” because it wouldn’t be advertising without a pun. It feels more like car porn. Still, as that genre goes, it’s pretty good—gorgeously shot and engaging enough, especially for a long-form spot sans copy. The landscape—Utah’s Bonneville Salt Flats Speedway—serves as a stunning backdrop, and the deliberately “delicate” classical music, Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, works nicely as a contrast for a revving engine and screeching tires, alluding to the car’s luxury sheen as well as its power.

Advertising Agency: Cundari, Toronto
Chief Creative Officer: Brent Choi
Associate Creative Director, Art Director: Raul Garcia
Associate Creative Director, Copywriter: Brian Murray
Production Company: Big Block
Director: Mark Glaser
Year: 2012


Taxi Toronto for Viagra (Case History, 2002/2011) – If you want a Lion, talk to your doctor

In their January 2002 press release Pfizer, the producer of Viagra, announced that they were ready to market the antidote to male erectile dysfunction in Canada. Pfizer commissioned Taxi Toronto to provide their angle on the campaign for Viagra. They had to overcome perceptions built up by jokes on late night comedy shows. They had to show that this drug was likely to benefit not just old men and sex fanatics but ordinary men. They aimed at visibility, universality, subtlety and vitality. In doing so they had to be careful not to say a single word about Viagra as a product because of the Canadian laws on pharmaceutical advertising.

Viagra (2002) – GOOD MORNING

The ad starts with an energetic man on his way to work with the soundtrack of “Good morning” from the musical “Singing in the rain.” He bounces down the footpath, past the white picket fence, past the postie and neighbours, hops down the hop skip and jump game, slam dunks a basketball, dances past Mario’s barber’s shop, bounds up the stairs from the train, chases the pigeons, leap frogs the Journal newspaper, cartwheels up to the front door of his office. As he walks into the lift/elevator the word “Viagra” appears on screen, with the encouragement to “Talk to your doctor”.

Creative Team: Alan Madill and Terry Drummond
Production Company: Avion Films
Director: Martin Granger

Viagra (2003) – CHAMPIONS

Queen’s track: “We are the champions” plays as a man bursts through his front door with arms raised. He joins others in the street in the kind of spontaneous celebration that takes after a world cup victory. The viagra pill supers on screen. We understand the real cause for celebration

Creative Team: Alan Madill and Terry Drummond
Production Company: Avion Films
Director: Martin Granger

Viagra (2005) – OFFICE/COACH/GOLF/ELEVATOR

A constant single non-musical tone completely drowns out a conversation. You see a man drop an amazing put and still he continues to tell his friend about his morning under this tone, while a Viagra logo appears over his mouth. Chuckles are heard. Talk to your doctor.

Creative Director: Zac Mroueh, Lance Martin
Copywriter: Irfan Khan
Art Director: Ron Smrczek
Production Company: The Partner Film Company, Toronto
Director: Joakim Back
Gold Lion for the Campaign

Viagra (2007) – WOMBLEMINKI/WUBBLEFLAPS

In Canada, ad drug regulations prevented us from talking about the benefits of Viagra. So we decided to show people talking in a made-up language that was punctuated with the word Viagra.

Executive Creative Director: Tom Goudie
Creative Director: Zac Mroueh, Ron Smrczeck
Copywriter: Michael Murray
Art Director: Jason Hill
Production Company: Partizan, Toronto
Director: Eric Lynne
Gold Lion & Silver Lion for the Campaign

Viagra (2008) – DENISE/VIVIAN/BOBBY/MICHELLE

In Canada, drug regulations prevent us from saying what a product does. Yet our brief was to communicate that Viagra equals great sex. So we created the Viagra Intermission- the sexiest Intermission the world has ever seen.

Executive Creative Director: Terry O’Reilly, Chris Tait
Creative Director: Ron Smrczeck
Copywriter: Michael Murray
Art Director: Jason Hill
Production Company: Radke Film Group, Toronto
Director: Eric Lynne
Shortlist

Viagra (2009) – ANTIQUING/READING/STROLLING

When couples stop having sex, they start filling that void with other activities. And while ‘couple’ activities like antiquing, strolling, reading and watching sports seem harmless at first, they can end up taking over couples’ lives. Viagra helps them get back to just having sex again. The campaign uses outdoor/print to raise awareness of these sex replacement activities. And the television spots share stories of couples who took their activities too far. With the help of Viagra, they were able to find their way back to the bedroom. Follow-up commercials ask couples if they too suffer from chronic ‘activities’.

Executive Creative Director: Darren Clarke, Clive Desmond
Creative Director: Ron Smrczeck
Copywriter: Stefan Wegner, Nathan Monteith
Art Director: Nathan Monteith, Stefan Wegner
Production Company: Soft Citizen
Director: The Perlorian Brothers
Gold Lion for the Campaign

Viagra (2011) – VIAGRA APOLOGIES

When men take Viagra having sex becomes the priority, so it’s no surprise they want to spend ‘quality time’ with their wives. Unfortunately, this can come at the expense of missing some scheduled time with their buddies.
Just so there’s no hard feelings, Viagra has given these men an opportunity to apologize to their friends.

Executive Creative Director: Steve Mykolyn
Creative Director: Darren Clarke
Copywriter: Mark Lewis
Art Director: Nicole Ellerton
Production Company: Go Film
Director: Christopher Guest
Bronze Lion