Leo Burnett Italy for WWF: Pets4Pets Project – Advertising thought by kids to get adults thinking

What about asking youngsters, instead of experienced creative directors, to create the strongest communication campaigns?

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Pets4Pets Project  taught little kids the secrets of the advertising industry; inviting them to imagine new social campaigns to help protect the animals they love the most. WWF, together with a team of creatives, photographers, illustrators, film directors, animators, post-producers and speakers helped students at an elementary school experience the whole creative process: from the brief, to the Pre Production Meeting, to the shooting, to going on-air. The result? Well see for yourself in the case video.

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The adventure starts in the classroom, then moves inside the creative agency and finally arrives on a production set. For all the experienced creatives there’s just one strict rule: “never ‘contaminate’ the kids’ ideas”, just offer them the production advice they lack. First Challenge: a print campaign.

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Second Challenge: a TV commercial.

The results

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“From the first sketch on a piece of paper, to 2 TV commercials, 4 radio announcements and 8 print campaigns, ready to go on-air”. For every creative piece, you can see the “before” and “after”: from the kids’ original sketches to the final executions ready to go on-air. One thing is immediately evident: the kids’ work is already 100% creatively effective.
The team of professionals just helped them “translate” their ideas into a language that adults can understand.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett Italy
Executive Creative Director: Francesco Bozza
Associate Creative Director: Andrea Marzagalli
Creative Team: Andrea Stanich, Sergio Spaccavento, Paolo Boccardi, Alice Crippa, Serena Micieli, Silvia Savoia
Executive Producer: Debora Magnavacca
Year: 2013


TBWA/Berlin for adidas – A Giant Case History

IMPOSSIBLE GOALKEEPER

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Just before the start of the UEFA Euro 2008 football tournament, adidas turned one of Vienna’s best-known landmarks, the Prater ferris wheel, into a huge image of the Czech national goalkeeper, Petr Cech. At a whooping 53m tall, this gigantic installation was visible far beyond the Prater entertainment park and the nearby public viewing sites. In the installation, Cech had eight arms that constantly rotated with the ferries wheel. The erection of the metal construction started on May 13 and was finished just before the launch of the tournament on the night of June 5, 2008. This advertising landmark also hosted the official adidas press conference prior to the tournament.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt
Creative: Marco Bezerra, Emiliano Treierveiler

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OLIVER KAHN BRIDGE

Oliver Kahn Poster Presentation

If you travelled to Munich for the first game of the FIFA World Cup in 2006, chances are you saw this huge installation, which shows an enormous Oliver Kahn (the then German national team goalkeeper) diving across the motorway. The 65-m installation managed to bypass the law forbidding advertising on the German Autobahn, and was the only piece of advertising adidas conducted in Germany during the tournament. Over 4 millions people commuted through the installation and many more saw it in the press. In its first week the Oliver Kahn bridge was displayed on double-page spreads in leading magazines including Focus, Stern, Autobild and Fortune. It was also picked up by newspapers including the New York Times and the Financial Times.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Kurt-Georg Dieckert
Creative: Helge Bloch, Boris Schwiedrzik

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IMPOSSIBLE HUDDLE

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For the duration of the UEFA EURO 2008 football tournament, TBWA/Berlin transformed the main hall of Zurich’s Central Station into a large-scale celebration of team spirit. Eleven European football players (all sponsored by adidas, naturally) formed the Impossible huddle. The bodies of the footballers represented were 3D-scanned as were their faces and hairstyles, to ensure that the sculptures were faithful to the originals. It took 40 trucks to move the installation components from the production sites in southern Germany to Switzerland, where they were assembled in the station.

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The Swiss rail authority reported that an estimate 13 million people passed through the station during the three-week period the sculptural installation was in site, and at 17m high and approximately 30m wide, it was impossible to miss. Add to this the fact that various news titles such as the Financial Times, Die Welt, Gazzetta dello Sport, Le Parisien and the BBC featured the campaign on their front pages or online editions, plus the fact that it was picked up by dozens of blog worldwide.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Markus Ewertz
Creative: Erik Gonan, Hendrik Scweder

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FOOTBALL FRESCO

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During the German-hosted 2006 FIFA World Cup, adidas wanted to get across the message that they cooperate with the best football players on the planet. Rather than run a traditional poster campaign, the creatives at TBWA/Berlin decided it would be far more impressive to create a huge Renaissance-style fresco on the ceiling of the main lobby of Cologne Central Station. Within minutes of the fresco’s unveiling, it was featured on national German Television and press covered it throughout the World Cup. More than 8.5 million people saw the frersco in the flesh during the course of the tournament.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Kurt-Georg Dieckert
Creative: Helge Bloch, Boris Schwiedrzik


BETC Euro RSCG for Sci Fi Channel – Adopt Sci Fi (Integrated Campaign)

In 2008 BETC Euro RSCG created this integrated campaign, which incorporated ambient, radio, press, film and on-line elements, to raise awareness of the Sci Fi Channel in France. The campaign was based around ten alien “children” toys that were placed in different locations acros eight French cities. Fans were then encouraged to search for them by following clues found on a website and in radio ads. Posters were also displayed around towns to advertise the website. The intention was to create an emotional link between the Brand and people who were not already fans of science fiction. Each alien found earned its rescuer a reward of 500 euros. When nine of the figures had been located it was revealed that the tenth had been placed in an orphanage, where it could be interacted with via a website and a page on Facebook.

The treasure hunt apect of the campaign appealed to fans of the Sci Fi Channel, while also attracting new viewers to the brand.


Advertising Agency: BETC Euro RSCG, Paris
Year: 2008


Wrangler/We Are Animals Campaign – The story behind the animals

In 2008, clothes company Wrangler put out a pitch to advertising agencies asking for help to reinvigorate the brand within the European youth market. It faced a specific image problem. “The problem was that Wrangler is an American brand, 125 years old, associated with middle America…” explains Fred Raillard of Parisian agency Fred & Farid. “So the perception of Wrangler was very much linked to the cowboy… But the cowboys in Europe was negative, because the cowboy means old, white America. It’s Marlboro, it’s John Wayne, it’s the people behind the indian genocide. It’s George Bush, who was hated in Europe”.

Despite this, Fred & Farid, which won the pitch, felt it was important not to stray too far away from the brand’s root in its new advertising. “You cannot start from scratch with the communication of a brand thai is 125 years old” continues Fred. “You cannot. Especially as in America the communication about the cowboy was to carry on… So we tried to extract the values of the rodeo  - the wildness, being on an animal, roughness. Also, the positive aspects of cowboys – environment, nature, living with animals. Living in sinch with nature, having courage. We tried to extract some values that would connect with young people in Europe. The we thought: maybe we could just move from the cowboy to the animal… To the horse, in fact…”

This concept tied in with an old logo for the brand that the creative team found during their research. The logo from the 1970s saw the letters of the Wrangler name forming the shape of a horse. It may have been what Raillard describes as “cheesy”, but it meant that Fred & Farid’s idea of focusing on the brand’s associations to animals had a heritage. They then tested the concept on the target audience, and connected the idea with the culture of the time. “It was a period when we where facing a crisis” says Fred, “everything was collapsing, the banks were collapsing, and in that period of time we all had the feeling that our human society had reached a limit. So it was relevant to highlight that maybe we’d lost something when we lost our animality…”

The slogan WE ARE ANIMALS was decided upon, though Fred & Farid realized that this high concept ran the risk of backfiring if the execution of the ads was too heavy-handed. The key was to emphasize the animal instincts of humans, but in an unexpectede way. “The first thing we decided was to never show any animals…” says Fred. “To not create confusion – we’re talking about human animality, so the big mistake would be to show an animal. Then we thought with such a strong statement, we couldn’t play around, we had to really do it. The whole background had to be animalistic – spontaneous, not too intellectual. So we decided to set up a way of working on Wrangler that was more spontaneous and creative…”

The team decided to avoid too much planning and over-thinking before the shoot, and to employ a photographer who was skilled in attaining a raw, natural quality to their work. “We looked at photographers not from the ad industry but from art” says Fred. “People who in their personal work are passionate about showing human animality, celebrating animality in humans. We choose Ryan McGinley, as already in his personal work he was really driven by the whole idea of our animality…”

McGinley’s shooting style is loose, and his work follows a tradition of documentary photography begun by artists such as Nan Goldin and Larry Clark. He developed his style in the late 1990s by documenting his friends and acquaintances in New York engaging in parties, sex and general hedonism. When he moved to more formal shoots, using models, he retained this naturalistic approach. A shoot of McGinley’s even a commercial one, will usually involve setting up loose parameters and scenarios, but otherwise letting events evolve naturally, with everything captured on camera.

Fred & Farid wholeheartedly embraced this style of working for Wrangler shoot, which took place in the New Jersey countryside over two nights. Twelve models were selected to take part, drawn not from professional agencies but from street-casting. Actors and performance artists were also among those chosen, and the shoot, when described by Fred, has the feel more of an art performance than a commercial exercise.

“It was a crazy shoot!” he says. “People made love in front of us… everybody got crazy for two nights. It was freezing like hell, we were wearing North Face jackets, and they were naked in nature! Everybody was amazing, everybody went for this art experience. We experimented with any idea that anybody had on set…”

Mcginley, and his assistant, Tim Barber, took thousands of photographs over the two nights, according to Fred. “So you don’t even have time to think about anything – any idea that anyone has you experiment with. It’s chaos, complete chaos… and inside this chaos some pearls pop up…”

The shoot resulted in a set of arresting images, which were used to create the posters that stood at the centre of the WE ARE ANIMALS campaign. Beyond the impact of the images themselfs, what is striking about the posters is the lack of overt branding. The brand’s logo appears at the bottom, alongside the tagline, but otherwise the photographs are given room to breathe, a highly unusual approch in billboard advertising today, where brands have a tendency to shout their messages.

Even the product itself is absent from many of the shoot. “We had to convince them” says Fred. “Clients want to show their product, but we really fought to convince them, to get them on board with us that it is more important to bring back the Wrangler attitude and make a connection with a new generation. They would never have done it by showing the denim, because even if it’s great denim, denim is not a surprising product. We all wear denim now…”

The WE ARE ANIMALS print and poster campaign is a great example of pure branding. Fred & Farid used other media to do the less exciting work of the ad campaign – using the Wrangler website to provide the vital product information, for example – but insisted that the posters be more ambiguous. It was a risk strategy that ultimately paid off for the jeans brand, injecting it with an edge and attitude that allowed Wrangler to stand out within an extremely crowded market.

Wrangler Jeans print advertising campaign, “We Are Animals”, won the Grand Prix for Print at Cannes International Advertising Festival.

The Wrangler campaign was developed at FFL Paris by executive creative directors Fred & Farid (Frederic Raillard and Farid Mokart), art directors/copywriters Julie Louison and Perinne Durand, copywriters Baptiste Clinet, Nicolas Lautier, Philippe Pinel, Frederick Lung. Filming was shot by  Ryan McGinley, known for his nude films.


Top 15 Beer Commercials (selected from the past 15 years of the One Show)

These spots represent the best of the best, chosen from a list of 32 Pencil and Merit winners. Enjoy.

1 – Carlton Draught/BIG AD

2006 ONE SHOW GOLD PENCIL

Agency
George Patterson Y&R / Melbourne

Art Director
Grant Rutherford

Creative Director
James McGrath

Director
Paul Middleditch

Production Company
Plaza Films , Peter Masterton

Writer
Ant Keogh

2 – Budweiser/WASSUP

2000 ONE SHOW GOLD PENCIL

Agency
DDB/Chicago

3 – Guinness/NOITULOVE

2007 ONE SHOW SILVER PENCIL

Agency
AMV BBDO/London

Art Director
Matt Doman

Creative Director
Paul Brazier

Director
Daniel Kleinman

Writer
Ian Heartfiel

4 – Lion Nathan/PURE WATERS

2010 ONE SHOW GOLD PENCIL

Agency
Publicis Mojo

Art Director
Steve Wakelam

Creative Director
Micah Walker

Director
Steve Rogers

Production Company
Revolver

Writer
Grant McAloon

5 – Guinness/SURFERS

2000 ONE SHOW GOLD PENCIL

Agency
AMV BBDO/London

Director
Jonathan Glazer

6 – Dos Equis/Rollerblading

2009 ONE SHOW BRONZE PENCIL

Agency
Euro RSCG / New York

Art Director
Karl Lieberman

Art Director
Simon Nickson

Creative Director
Alicia Johnson

Creative Director
Hal Wolverton

Director
Steve Miller

Production Company
Radical Media

Writer
Brandon Henderson

Writer
Laura Fegley

7 – Bud Light/DUDE

2008 ONE SHOW MERIT AWARD

Agency
DDB / Chicago

Art Director
Kenny/Clay Herzog/Weiner

Creative Director
Paul Tilley, Chuck Rachford, Chris Roe, Mark Gross

Writer
Kenny/ Clay Herzog/Weiner

8 – Dos Equis/JAI ALAI

2010 ONE SHOW MERIT AWARD

Agency
Euro RSCG / New York

Art Director
Dave Arnold

Creative Director
Conway Williamson, David Weinstockr

Director
Steve Miller

Production Company
Radical Media

9 – Bud Light/MR.REALLY REALY BAD DANCER

2004 ONE SHOW MERIT AWARD

Agency
DDB/Chicago

Creative Director
John Immesoete, Mark Gross, Bill Cimino, Bob Winter, Chris Roe

Director
John Immesoete, Greg Popp, Noam Murro

Production Company
Partizan, Biscuit

Writer
John Immesoete

10 – Tiger Beer/TASTE IN THIS LIFE

2007 ONE SHOW MERIT AWARD

Agency
Saatchi & Saatchi NZ / Auckland

Art Director
Andy DiLallo, Jay Benjamin, Cameron Harris

Creative Director
Toby Talbot, Mike O’Sullivan

Director
Jesse Warn

Production Company
Film Construction

Writer
Jay Benjamin, Andy DiLallo, Cameron Harris, Tom Hazledine

 11 – Guinness/BRING IT TO LIFE

2010 ONE SHOW MERIT AWARD

Agency
Abbott Mead Vickers BBDO / London

Art Director
Paul Brazier

Creative Director
PAUL BRAZIER

Director
Johnny Green

Production Company
Knucklehead

Writer
Paul Brazier

12 – Miller Brewing Company/MILLER AUDITION CAMPAIGN

2006 ONE SHOW SILVER PENCIL

Agency
Young & Rubicam / Chicago

Art Director
Mark Figliulo, Corey Ciszek

Creative Director
Dave Loew, Jon Wyville, Mark Figliulo

Director
Spike Jonze

Production Company
MJZ

Writer
Ken Erke, Pete Figel

13 – Milwaukee’s Best Light/BREWED FOR A MAN’S TASTE CAMPAIGN

2006 ONE SHOW BRONZE PENCIL

Agency
Mother / New York

Art Director
Rob Baird

Creative Director
Linus Karlsson, Paul Malmstrom

Director
John O’Hagan

Production Company
Rsa Usa

Writer
Ann Lieberman, Dave Clark

14 – Miller Light/SKY DIVER

2006 ONE SHOW MERIT AWARD

Agency
DDB/Chicago

Art Director
Dan Strasser

Creative Director
Mark Gross

Director
Michael Downing

Writer
Joe Sgro

15 – Guinness/A WOMAN NEEDS A MAN LIKE A FISH NEEDS A BYCYCLE 

1997 ONE SHOW MERIT AWARD

Agency
Ogilvy/New York

Art Director
Clive Yaxley

Creative Director
Patrick Collister

Director
Tony Kaye

Writer
Jerry Gallaher


Wieden+Kennedy Portland for Dodge (2010/2012)

Dodge Charger – Man’s Last Sand

A collection of men refuse to comply with a collection of modern activities. They rebel in their dodge charger. Dodge, an American motoring icon, is currently focused on clarifying and re-energizing its presence in the marketplace. The opening salvo in this effort is this new commercial set to appear during the 2010 Super Bowl, where Dodge will reach its core male target as well as the broader American culture. Based on the simple truth that while men will sacrifice a lot in their daily life to maintain a harmonious relationship with their girlfriend, their wife, their boss, their career—this spot shows there’s ultimately a limit to their chivalry. Especially when there’s a Dodge involved. In this commercial, Dodge re-affirms its relationship to the sort of men that love to drive real American driving cars, and at the same time tells America at large, through the Super Bowl stage, that Dodge is back with renewed energy and focus.

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Dodge Grand Caravan – Kittens/Turncoat



Dodge’s advertising, just like its cars, is made “in the defense of driving”—a force against the commoditized “beige boxes” that have become so commonplace across America. In contrast, Dodge celebrates the true spirit of American driving with pride and energy. Starting with the key features of Wi-Fi hotspot, voice-activated navigation and Flo TV, we developed the “Turncoat” and “Alright, Kittens” ads to show the extreme end of how the Grand Caravan could be used and driven. They dramatically bring to life what makes the Grand Caravan a unique vehicle: It has everything, so you can do anything.

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Dodge Challenger – Freedom

“Freedom” is a retelling of an important battle in the American Revolutionary War told as grandiose and beautiful as all American folktales. It first ran during the US vs England World Cup game that aired on June 12, 2010.


Though it isn’t a literal retelling of history, it’s a new American folktale about how American freedom was created. Dodge is making a statement about how cars are a very American thing, and how cars like the Challenger can reinvigorate this country’s passion for driving.

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Dodge Tent Event – Invisible Monkey Campaign

After getting into some hot water for the original Dodge Tent Event commercial, W+K got creative to appease all parties involved.

Our challenge from Dodge was to create a breakthrough campaign promoting a free, 60-day test-drive. Our solution was not just any tent sale but the Dodge Tent Event, complete with balloons, confetti, a giant red-and-white tent and the kicker, a chimpanzee dressed as a stuntman.
With Monkey
The commercial garnered a lot of views and comments on YouTube, then PETA saw it. PETA demanded that Dodge remove the chimp immediately. Within hours we had literally taken the chimp out of the ad and rerecorded the VO. The “PETA-friendly” spot was back on TV within days.
Without Monkey
People were wondering whether the solution was a “middle finger” to PETA. In order to steer the conversation, we asked Next Media Animation World News (NMA), the Internet-famous Taiwanese news-animation company, to help us tell the real story in an organic way that could be seen by an already-captive web audience. So they did, in a day. Actually in five hours. It worked. The story (of the Invisible Monkey) got out. The media was swayed. The collaboration between W+K and NMA was kept under wraps. PETA was happy again with Dodge.

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Dodge Charger – Period Piece

Dodge set out to prove that car chases make movies better. To do this, they’ve taken a stuffy Merchant & Ivory-type period love story full of costumes and haughty British accents, and turned it into something we all would stand up and cheer for.

More cars and more driving make for a better movie. In a spot titled “Fast Five—Period Piece,” Dodge and director Steve Rogers take a turgid period film and give it some much-needed horsepower. This spot pays homage to Dodge’s partnership with Universal Pictures for the fifth installment of the Fast&Furious franchise,Fast Five, a film that has a lot of high-stakes chases and a lot of cars, including the 2011 Dodge Charger.

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Dodge Charger – The Future of Driving


In today’s day and age, we are surrounded by technology – right from the air-conditioners, television and refrigerators in our homes to the laptops, PDAs and smartphones at work. The dependency on technology is so much in our lives that it no longer aids us but controls us and sometimes takes out the fun in doing things manually. This is exactly what Dodge Charger portrays in The Future of Driving 2011 Commercial. According to the 2011 Dodge Charger The Future of Driving Commercial, robots can take our food, our clothes and our homes, but they will never take our cars.

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Dodge Journey – Search Engine for the Real World

The 2012 Dodge Journey was built to be a search engine for the real world – a perfect vehicle for adventurous people who actually explore the world instead of just reading about it online. To get people to explore the world wide world, Dodge hid three 2012 Dodge Journeys across America. You find it, you keep it..

Describe the brief from the client
The Dodge Journey was built to help people to explore the worldwide world. But we wanted to do more than just tell them this, we wanted to get them off the couch and actually out there.
Creative Execution
We brought together all the chatter surrounding the campaign onto our YouTube page, combining the conversations from Twitter, Facebook and YouTube into one place.
Describe the creative solution to the brief/objective.
We started with a series of TV commercials. But unlike other car ads, the final heroic shot of the car was a challenge: the Journey they’ve just seen is still waiting at that same beautiful location. If the viewer went there, they could have it. The commercials themselves contained clues and a 24/7 live camera feed showed people exactly where it was – encouraging them to start looking.
Describe the results in as much detail as possible.
Even though only a few people got to drive home in a new Journey, everyone involved got to experience an exciting real-world adventure that inspired them to get out there.

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Dodge Grand Caravan – The Right Tool for the Job


The majority of Americans are driving the wrong car. One that doesn’t fit their lives, or their needs. So they end up having to do things like mount a cargo bin to the roof just to take a weekend trip with the family. Or rent a U-Haul to run to IKEA. In this campaign, we hold a mirror up to all those people who are trying to get by with cars that don’t fit their lives and highlight the Dodge Grand Caravan.

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Dodge Dart – How To Change Cars Forever



What do you need to create a groundbreaking compact car? Smart people, great ideas—and a healthy sense of humor.
That’s according to this entertaining 90-second spot from Wieden + Kennedy in Portland, Ore., for the 2013 Dodge Dart, offering a easy step-by-step instruction guide for designing and engineering a worthwhile entry in the competitive compact-car segment. Basically, you need lots of coffee, not a lot of other commitments, not a lot of committees or finance guys, and a whole lot of refining and refining and refining. The playful rapid-fire presentation is vintage W+K, which has built reserves of wry humor into the Dodge brand for several years now. In a nice touch, the Dart spot—directed by Christopher Riggert of Biscuit Filmworks—also features a celebrity endorsement by Tom Brady, in the form of Brady questioning whether he’s even right for the role. The spot’s energy is derived largely from a solid choice of soundtrack: the Jay-Z and Kanye West track “No Church in the Wild,” from their Watch the Throne album. The spot, titled “How to Change Cars Forever,” also introduces the tagline “New rules,” to emphasize that Dodge is redefining what a compact car can be. “Adding a dose of fun, creative license and Dodge brand humor, ‘How to Change Cars Forever’ captures the meticulous process of starting with a simple idea and developing it into a revolutionary new car, including the angst and pressure of a blank page, trials and errors of the early stages, and molding, shaping and testing the Dodge Dart until it was right,” says Olivier Francois, marketing chief at Chrysler Group. “We wanted to provide a peek inside what it takes to bring a new car to fruition.”

W+K continues to make such glimpses worth your while.


Leo Burnett Iberia for laSexta – Alcatraz Delivery

For the launch of the series Alcatraz, the Spanish TV channel laSexta created a big buzz based on a prison delivery service. People could experience how it is to be in prison without leaving home by simply ordering typical food prisoners eat in prisons. The food was prepared by a frightening man and delivered by an escorted detainee.  Courageous clients could even address their complains to a customer service. The meals were also delivered for free to important bloggers and journalists in Spain to make the campaign go viral.

In parallel, laSexta used junk mails, virals, posters and the delivery van as a mean of communication.

The brief from the client
In order to launch J.J. Abrams’ new series, ‘Alcatraz’, we decided to give our viewers a prison-like experience from the comfort of their own home Our chef ‘Butch’ was in charge of preparing a truly disgusting meal that would be delivered by our inmates in the prisoners van, always under the custody of a police man. Each order came with a dossier with detailed information about the series.

Creative Execution
The prisoners, constantly watched over by a policeman, delivered a disgusting menu using a prison van, and every single order had a dossier with detailed information about the serial and the première on the Spanish TV channel La Sexta. We promoted our service with direct-mail advertising, posters, fridge magnets etc. Furthermore, we even created customer support line manned by the prisoners themselves, in case anyone would dare to complain about the food quality or the service.
 From concept to implementation
We promoted the service, as any other food delivery would. We used junk mail, posters, fridge magnets, etc. Orders were taken by phone or on the website. We even created a customer service call centre to receive complaints. Such a peculiar delivery soon caught the media’s attention and we even made a delivery to one of the highest rated TV shows in the country, which guaranteed Alcatraz was the most successful launch of the season.
Results
More than 1,500 orders were delivered during the first 2 weeks, generating buzz about the show and making Alcatraz the most watched première of the season, with 4.8m viewers.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett Iberia, Spain
Executive Creative Director: Juan García-Escudero
Creative Directors: Fernando Martín, Javier Álvarez
Copywriters: Alejandro Hernán, Fred Bosch, Javier Martínez, Pouline Atencio
Art Directors: Alejandro Hernán, Fred Bosch, Javier Martínez, Pouline Atencio, Seve Ruiz
Interactive Creatives: Alejandro Hernán, Fred Bosch, Javier Martínez, Pouline Atencio
Designer: Pouline Atencio
Year: 2012


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