CoorDown – #DammiPiùVoce (Saatchi & Saatchi Italy strikes back)

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Background
In Italy, due to prejudice, the basic rights of people with Down syndrome are still too often denied. With more funds available it would be possible to defend their rights.

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Idea
On launch day, on the site CoorDown.it, 50 people with Down Syndrome each appeared on video appealing to 50 celebrities for a donation. But not of money: they asked them to donate a video. A video in which they, the celebrities, asked for the money to support people with Down syndrome, amplifying their voices. A video, which if then shared via the celebrities’ social networks, would have more chance of being listened to.

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Spartaco & Jovanotti

Andrea & Sharon Stone

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZBpAkceijU

Federico & Castrogiovanni

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Results

50 out of 50 celebrities donated a video and shared it on their social networks, including the singers Tiziano Ferro andJovanotti; the footballers TottiMaterazzi and Zanetti; the rugby player Castrogiovanni; the star chef Carlo Cracco; the Real Madrid coach Jose Mourinho and the actress Sharon Stone.
Thanks to the social networks shares and all the media coverage, the campaign reached almost 30 million people, half of the italian population. And donations were up 700%, compared to Coordown’s previous fundraising campaign.

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, Italy
Creative Directors: Alessandro Orlandi, Luca Lorenzini, Luca Pannese
Art Director: Luca Pannese
Copywriter: Luca Lorenzini
Social Network specialist: Flavia Pipola
Head of Interactive Production: Silvio Coco
Web Developer: Dario Cataldi
Producer: Erica Lora-Lamia
Head of TV: Raffaella Scarpetti
Editor: Fulvio Rossetti
Social Media Partner: Ambito 5
Website development: Logicweb
Partners: Top Digital, Flipper Music, Luca Bottale, H-Films, Getty Images, Google, Akita
Year: 2013


Silent Film Festival’s Trailers – The World First Instagram Film Experience

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The Toronto Silent Film Festival has taken to another new-media platform to promote its upcoming event. The festival has set up three Instagram accounts, which each contain “trailers” for silent movies. There’s tsff_1, which showcases Murnau’s classic Sunrise: A Song of Two Humanstsff_2, featuring an excerpt from the 1925 feature Tumbleweeds; and tsff_3, taken from the Del Lord short Super-Hooper-Dyne Lizzies. To view each trailer, head to the relevant Instagram account on your smartphone and scroll rapidly though the images to create a flip book-like effect.

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The idea for the novel advertising method came from Canadian advertising agency Cossette, which explained its thinking behind the campaign to Creative Review: “It feels appropriate to be using a technology like Instagram to promote the silent film technique,” says co-chief creative officer Matt Litzinger, explaining that silent film was “in its day.. every bit as ground-breaking and innovative as digital platforms are today.”

Agency: Cossette
Co-CCOs, Creative Directors: Matthew Litzinger, David Daga
Copywriter: Sebastian Lyman
Art Director: Pepe Bratanov
Year: 2013


Droga Give Me 5 (from Underground Creative School, Buenos Aires)

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They are a group of 25 digital creative students of Underground, a creative school in Buenos Aires. All of them wanted to accomplish our studies and get a job but with such a huge competitive scenario we needed to find somehow, a way to stand out. That´s how they came out with an idea: they had to work for the best creative in the world. If they could get his attention we would be able to get anyone’s.

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Advertising School: Underground Creative School, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Creative Director: Diego Rubio
Creatives: María Paula Castaño Cadena, Lucas Kraglievich, Sandra Lopez, Josefina Salgado, Laura Perez Millan, Camilo Rodríguez, Fede Green, Jorge Anastasiu, Sebastian Merino Luque, Jaime Vanegas Restrepo, Mario Anchorena Aitken, Jorge Garcia, Oscar Andrés Rincón, Maye Duarte, Nau Pintos, Manuel Torres Gere, Felipe Arenas, Angela Binimelis, Aye Piru, Andrea Saturno, Bruno Waldbaum, Nat Os, Leandro Baca, César Bené Guerrero
Photographer: Martín Levi


Crispin Porter + Bogusky for Just Dance 3 – Autodance

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Just Dance is the fun dance game series that anyone can pick up and play. But until now, the audience has been limited to teenage girls. For the launch of Just Dance 3, the brief was to expand the audience, with no media spend.
To promote the release of Just Dance 3, Crispin Porter + Bogusky created Autodance, an app that proves anyone can Just Dance. Simply record your friends doing stuff and the app syncs their movements to a choice of dance tracks from the video game. Like magic, your friends will be shaking their stuff in a branded music video that can be shared online.

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Autodance is more than just a fun app. It’s a fun tool to get people to make and share our ads for us. Each user-generated video acts as an advert for Just Dance 3, and features our tagline “Anyone can Just Dance”, along with an end card for the game.
The app proved so successful it’s now been incorporated into Just Dance 4.

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With no media spend, Autodance exposed Just Dance 3 to a new audience of millions. And over Christmas 2011, Just Dance 3 became the best-selling video game in Europe.

Results:
App Downloads: 6.3 Million
User-generated videos: 32 Million
Video views (in phone): 118 Million
Video views (on Facebook): 32 Million
Total video shares (Facebook and Youtube): 2.9 Million
Facebook likes: 4.3 Million
Facebook comments: 2.4 Million

Advertising Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky, Gothenburg
Creative Director: Mattias Berg
Copywriter: Jim Connolly
Art Director: Mattias Berg
Production Company: Adore You
Chief Creative Officer: Rob Reilly
Executive Creative Director: Gustav Martner
Executive Creative Director: Bjorn Hoglund
Creative Technology Director: Per Rundgren
Head of Interactive: Marcus Aslund
Interactive Developer: Martin Furuberg
Motion Designer : Motion Designer Jörgen Bengtsson
Visual Designer: Stephano Dinamarca Fernández
Visual Designer: Mattias Nordenham
Year: 2011

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McCann Australia for Metro Trains Melbourne – Is “Dumb Ways To Die” the new “Chipotle”?

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“Dumb Ways to Die”, is an integrated advertising campaign designed to curb the number of train-related deaths in Victoria. The campaign is centred around a three-minute animated music video, highlighting the many dumb ways there are to die, with being hit by a train – a very preventable death – among them. The video and iTunes single are accessible online at DumbWaysToDie.com, with animated gifs being released on Tumblr, on radio, in posters on small and large space outdoor and throughout the Metro Trains network, with the lyrics to the song on the art work.

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The Idea: Safety PSAs are gloomy and tedious and largely ignored by young people hardwired to resist them—except when they’re irresistibly fun and impossible not to share with friends. McCann Australia managed just such an evolution of the genre with “Dumb Ways to Die” its animated train-safety spot for the Melbourne Metro. The three-minute music video shows adorable blobs making the stupidest decisions ever—messing with animals, sticking forks in toasters, eating superglue, etc.—leading to all sorts of gruesome, fatal accidents. The dumbest way to die, the ad suggests at the end, is by being careless around trains. “The idea for a song started from a very simple premise: What if we disguised a worthy safety message inside something that didn’t feel at all like a safety message?” said McCann executive creative director John Mescall. “So we thought about what the complete opposite of a serious safety message would be and came to the conclusion it was an insanely happy and cute song.” With more than 30 million YouTube views, it seems happy, cute and grisly was the way to go.

The Song: The song begins, “Set fire to your hair/Poke a stick at a grizzly bear/Eat medicine that’s out of date/Use your private parts as piranha bait,” before the chorus repeats the two lines, “Dumb ways to die/So many dumb ways to die.” Mescall wrote most of the lyrics in one night at the agency. “It then took a few weeks of finessing,” he said, “getting rid of a few lines that weren’t funny enough and replacing them with new ones.” The line “Sell both your kidneys on the Internet” was a late inclusion. “I’m glad it’s there. It’s my favorite,” he said.

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Australian musician Ollie McGill from the band The Cat Empire wrote the music. “We basically gave him the lyrics and told him to set it to the catchiest nonadvertising type music he could,” said Mescall. McGill delivered something almost unbearably catchy. “The melody is easy to remember and sing along to, the lyrics are fun, bite-sized chunks of naughtiness, and the vocals have just the right amount of knowing innocence,” Mescall said. “It’s a song that you want to hate for living in your head, but you can’t bring yourself to hate it because it’s also so bloody likable.” The singer is Emily Lubitz of another Australian band, Tinpan Orange. (The song is credited to Tangerine Kitty, which is a mashup of the two band names.) “Emily brought a great combination of innocence, playfulness and vocal integrity,” Mescall said. “She brings a level of vocal quality you don’t normally get on a video about cartoon death.”

The Art Direction: Australian designer Julian Frost did the animation. “We gave him the most open brief we could: Just make it really funny and really awesome and do it to please yourself,” said Mescall. The visual reference points ranged from Edward Gorey’s The Gashlycrumb Tinies to Monty Python’s “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” (which showed men singing while being crucified) to “any number of hokey indie music-video flash mobs you see on YouTube,” said Mescall.

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“Julian was keen to contrast the extreme situations described in the lyrics with the simplest animation possible. Otherwise it would become just too much.” After the spot blew up online, Frost wrote on his website: “Well, the Internet likes dead things waaay more than I expected. Hooray, my childish sense of humor pays off at last.”

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The spot lives online, in short bursts on music TV, and may reach cinemas. The campaign is also running in radio, print and outdoor. The song is on iTunes, where it reached the top 10. The agency is also producing a book as well as a smartphone game that should be ready by Christmas.

Advertising Agency: McCann, Melbourne
Executive Creative Director: John Mescall
Creative Team: John Mescall, Pat Baron
Animation: Julian Frost
Digital Team: Huey Groves, Christian Stocker
Year: 2012


Nike – The Chain (the World’s Longest User Generated Video)

The Chain is the world’s longest user generated football video and is edited together from user submissions. The Chain is a feast of homebrewed football moves from all corners of the globe, with one user passing the ball to the next. The brand moves from being a speaker to being a facilitator of the message of the global movement for beautiful football. The consumers become the voice.

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The Chain campaign was kicked off – literally – by Ronaldinho. The football star was filmed kicking a ball out of the camera frame, and then viewers were encouraged to filmed the following link in the chain. The rules were very simple: the ball must enter from the left and exit to the right. Beyond this the participants could show off thei footballing skills any way they liked. Over 40.000 films were uploaded to the website, with 2.000 of those selected for use in The Chain, a two-hour football video that has been viewed by more than 20 million people.

Advertising Agency: FramFab Denmark, Copenhagen
Creative Director: Lars Cortsen
Copywriter: Thomas Robson
Art Director: Rasmus Frandsen
Designer: Kristian Groove Møller
Interactive Designer: Kristian Groove Moller, Martin Mohr
Programmer: Martin Ludvigsen
Technical Director: Jesper Arvidson
Producer: Simon Ryhede/Michael Amsinck
Year: 2006
GOLD LION (2006, Cannes International Advertising Festival)
GOLD (2006, London International Awards)
GOLD (2006, Epica – Europes premier creative awards) ,
GRANDPRIX (2006, Eurobest Awards),
GOLD (2007, The One Show),
GOLD (2007, CLIO, “Fresh Approach”), SILVER (2007, CLIO, “Brand Building”),
NOMINATION (2007, D&AD Awards”)


Air France/Music in the Sky – The Sky Has Something to Say

Air France Music is known and renowned for its exclusive musical selections. As suitable for an airline company, they are now inviting music lovers to turn their heads towards the sky with the new iPhone application “Music in the Sky”, designed by its agency BETC.

The principle is both poetic and fun: exclusive tunes are hidden in the clouds and all you have to do is catch them by lifting your iPhone, which automatically adds them to your playlist. Anyone with an iPhone can use the app, but travelling passengers will also have the privilege of discovering new tracks depending on where they are in the world: from Paris to Tokyo to Buenos Aires, the sky will hide its own music.

For the first time, thanks to the application, Air France Music fans will be able to listen to the “on air” selections played on board the planes also on terra firma. To celebrate the launch, unreleased tracks from François & the Atlas Mountains, Eugene McGuinness, Villagers, Melody’s Echo Chamber and Tomorrow’s World will be revealed. Finally, throughout the year, Air France Music will organise competitions in the app with the chance to win unreleased tracks, concert tickets or even plane tickets. The Air France Music application can be downloaded free in the Apple Store.

Advertising Agency: BETC
Creative Director: Florence Bellisson
Art Director: Sebastien Partika, Esteban Lebour, Alexandre Saad
Copywriter: Edouard olhagaray, Guillaume Rebbot
Web Designer: Bernard Quarante
Year: 2012


Microsoft Xbox/Halo3 – The Believe Campaign

 “A hero is more than a person, a hero is a belief. A belief that, against impossible odds, the world can be saved—and that the world is still worth saving. Heroes inspire that belief in us. They renew our faith and give us that most precious of all gifts—hope. The world  needs heroes. That’s why, when a true hero arrives, the world will honor him.— Xbox.com introduction of “Believe”.

In a bid to reach new audience for Halo franchise for the release of Halo 3, a futuristic human versus aliens science fiction videogame, McCann and T.A.G. in San Francisco came up with this complex integrated campaign that utilizes both film and online advertising. They created a large diorama that documented a historic battle, which was filmed for tv and cinema spots. An interactive flythrough tour of the diorama was then also placed online. It was all intended to present Halo as a story with real emotion. “Our objective was to use every medium we could to communicate the simple idea that Master Chief (the hero of the game) is a true hero to all humankind” says John Patroulis, creative Director at T.A.G.

“The goal was to make this the biggest title lunch in Xbox history” Patroulis continues. “And we went about it by executing a global campaign that used absolutely no game footage, starred either plastic figures or old men in its films, used classic music as its soundtrack, and almost never showed Master Chief”

“The ability to really move people is limited in a 30- or even 60-second TV spot, but the chance of something that’s more interactive or longer format…that’s the same feeling you get as after you’ve gone through a story or an experience and that’s what moves people... – Taylor Smith, Global Communications Director, Xbox

Halo 3 became the fastest pre-selling game in history and made 170 million in sales on its first day, the biggest launch in entertainment history.

Halo 3 – Believe

Halo3 Short Film 1 – Enemy Weapon

Halo3 Short Film 2 – Museum

Halo3 Short Film 3 – Hunted

Halo3  Short Film 4 – Gravesite

Halo3 Documentary – The John 117 Monument


BETC Euro RSCG for Sci Fi Channel – Adopt Sci Fi (Integrated Campaign)

In 2008 BETC Euro RSCG created this integrated campaign, which incorporated ambient, radio, press, film and on-line elements, to raise awareness of the Sci Fi Channel in France. The campaign was based around ten alien “children” toys that were placed in different locations acros eight French cities. Fans were then encouraged to search for them by following clues found on a website and in radio ads. Posters were also displayed around towns to advertise the website. The intention was to create an emotional link between the Brand and people who were not already fans of science fiction. Each alien found earned its rescuer a reward of 500 euros. When nine of the figures had been located it was revealed that the tenth had been placed in an orphanage, where it could be interacted with via a website and a page on Facebook.

The treasure hunt apect of the campaign appealed to fans of the Sci Fi Channel, while also attracting new viewers to the brand.


Advertising Agency: BETC Euro RSCG, Paris
Year: 2008


McDonald’s Canada – Our Food. Your Questions.

After fielding roughly 6,000 questions online about its food, McDonald’s Canada is taking the conversation “offline” with a new advertising campaign.

In June, McDonald’s Canada launched an interactive digital platform, “Our Food. Your Questions.” in an effort to be more transparent with consumers about where its food comes from and how it’s made. Consumers asked everything from calorie counts of certain menu items to why McDonald’s burgers and fries don’t rot when left out for a long period of time.

McDonald’s has now launched an integrated advertising campaign to reach even more Canadians and invite them to join the conversation online.

“The initial success of the program is a real testament to the power of creating meaningful and open dialogue with customers,” said Joel Yashinsky, chief marketing officer at McDonald’s Canada. “This level of transparency has resonated with our guests and has created the type of conversation we want to have with them about our food. We’re excited to see how far it can go.”

The campaign from Tribal DDB Toronto includes television, digital and various outdoor media. Since its inception the company’s response team has covered almost 6,000 questions at the site.  Answers have been posted using text, photos and video.

“The program exceeded all our expectations and we learned from customer feedback that this is an important opportunity for us to continue and evolve the dialogue with our customers,” said Joel Yashinsky, chief marketing officer at Toronto-based McDonald’s Canada. “We wanted to broaden it so that the reach allowed all customers in Canada to be aware of the program and ask any questions they had about our food.”

The TV spot shows questions from the website with behind-the-scenes shots from McDonald’s operations, for example a burger getting prepped for a photo shoot after the question, “Why does your food look different in the advertising than what’s in store?” Meanwhile, video projections on buildings in urban centres will feature select questions and answers–some still and some full-motion with answers that were done on video. “It will [give] a surprise to people in those areas to see the projection of these questions that are very provocative and raise the awareness of the program,” said Yashinsky. Yashinsky said the platform “is going to run forever… We think this is a great two-way conversation for us to have with our customers that we don’t want to end.”

How McDonald’s Canada Makes their World Famous Fries

Did you know that McDonald’s World Famous Fries are made from whole potatoes harvested mainly from farms in New Brunswick, Alberta, and Manitoba? Watch and see exactly how our fries get made, from the farm to the fryer.

“What is in the sauce that is in the Big Mac?”

Christine H. from Oshawa asked, “What is in the sauce that is in the Big Mac?”

Where McDonald’s Canada Gets Our Hamburger Patties From

You’ve probably heard that every McDonald’s Canada hamburger patty is made with 100% pure Canadian beef. But what does that really mean? To find out, we visited Cargill’s processing plant in northern Alberta to give you an all-access look at exactly what our hamburger patties are made from and how they get made.

“Why don’t you guys grill the patties? Better than microwaves!”

“Why don’t you guys grill the patties? Better than microwaves!” Jeffry B. from Oshawa asked. McDonald’s Canada Manager of National Operations Drew Sadler answered.

Is 100% pure beef the name of a company?

“Is your beef actually 100% pure beef or is that just the name of the company?” That’s what John R., from Toronto asked. Our answer: a corporate title search to see if the company actually exists.

Behind the scenes at a McDonald’s photo shoot

Isabel M from Toronto asked “Why does your food look different in the advertising than what is in the store?”

The McNugget under the microscope

Sheri N. from Saskatoon asked, “Is the thing about the Chicken McNuggets true? They are made from a processed pink sludge of meat and bones ground up with chemicals?”

Real Egg Crackdown

“Does your Egg McMuffin use real eggs? They look to perfect” To answer this question our Crew Members were brought in to prove that McDonald’s® Canada uses real freshly cracked Canada Grade A eggs so often, they’ve got skills.

“Why is the food at McDonald’s so cheap?”

“Why is the food at mcdonalds so cheap?” Joanne S., from Toronto asked. McDonald’s Canada President and CEO John Betts answered.

Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB, Toronto, Canada
Creative Director: Louis-Philippe Tremblay
Copywriter:Ryan Lawrence
Art Director:Benson Ngo
Agency Producer: Melanie Lambertsen
Account Director: Miles Savage
Production Company: Family Style
Directors: John Weyman, Torey Kohara
Line Producer: Liz Dussault
Post-Production Company: School – Various
Editor: School – Various
Audio House: RNW
Talent: Real People (McDonald’s Employees, suppliers)


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