Coca-Cola Happiness Truck around the World – Where Will Happiness Strike Next?

Inspired by the vending machine that dispensed Coca-Cola and other “doses of happiness” on a college campus in New York and quickly became a global viral video sensation; a specially rigged Coca-Cola delivery truck took to the streets of  Rio de Janeiro recently to spread refreshment and smiles to passers-by.

All the action is captured in a two-and-a-half-minute film. In the video, several unsuspecting Brazilians push a button on the back of the truck to dispense Coca-Cola and other fun items such as soccer balls, surfboards and sunglasses.

“‘Happiness Machine’ connected with so many people because the emotion was authentic, unscripted and contagious,” said A.J. Brustein, Global Senior Brand Manager, Coca-Cola. “We wanted to inspire that same feeling again by creating something consumers would respond to and want to share with others because it put a smile on their face.” 

Happiness Truck is one of many videos that can be found on the Facebook hub for “Where Will Happiness Strike Next?”. The hub features more than 25 films from around the world that have been created by local Coca-Cola teams to continue the theme of the award-winning “Happiness Machine,” which has generated more than 3 million online views. The interactive site lets consumers search for videos by country and even vote for where they’d like to see happiness strike next.

“We weren’t trying to replace ‘Happiness Machine’ with the ‘Happiness Truck,'” said Christy Amador, Digital Marketing Manager, Global Content Excellence.  “We wanted to build on this great idea and continue to answer the question, ‘Where Will Happiness Strike Next?’ by  spreading a message of happiness around the globe. These videos from markets all over the world help us to do just that.”

Two of the new films on the hub include a version of “Happiness Truck” filmed in the Philippines and “Happiness Store,” where convenience store customers in Rio are surprised with confetti, lights, live music and more upon grabbing a Coca-Cola from the cooler. “Happiness Machine” – which cost very little to produce – proved that we don’t need to spend millions to produce winning creative, and that great ideas and content can be sourced from anywhere.

 

Happiness Truck in Rio De Janeiro

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Where will happiness strike next?

Happiness Truck in Canada

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Toronto, Vancouver & Montreal, Canada. After a full day of sharing happiness, the experience culminated in a 3-city simultaneous musical celebration featuring Kardinal Offishall in Toronto, These Kids Wear Crowns in Vancouver & Duke Squad in Montreal, to celebrate Coca-Cola’s 125th Anniversary. Where will happiness strike next?

Happiness Truck in Philippines

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Marikina, Philippines. Where will happiness strike next?

Happiness Truck in Kenya

Happiness Truck in Malaysia

The town with a population of over 150,000 kicked off its evening with a surprise from Coca-Cola’s Semangat Truck. What a nice prelude to dinner.

Happiness Truck in Venezuela

Happiness Truck in Ecuador

Happiness Truck in India

Happiness Truck in Russia (CHRISTMAS Edition)

Happiness Truck in France (UEFA Edition and OLYMPIC Edition)

Happiness Truck in Honduras

Happiness Truck in Turkey

Happiness Truck in Naples (COKE & MEALS Edition)

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is transformed into a happiness table in a small square in Naples. Famous chef Simone Rugiati is on a mission asking people
to eat together delivering “doses” of happiness through a magic food cloche.

Happiness Truck/The Cheering Truck in Argentina (FOOTBALL Edition)

This time, Coca-Cola outfitted a special red truck with a recording booth and has been travelling around Argentina collecting the cheers of football (or soccer depending on where you are from) fans to support the Argentinean team. Fans are encouraged to record their cheer to be heard by millions.

The truck drove through 19 different provinces in Argentina as it collected the cheer of over a million different voices. On the day of the match, the Coca-Cola Cheering Truck drove into a stadium that only had room for 50 thousand fans and played the recordings of over a million fans chanting and cheering for the team. Way to rally the troop Coca-Cola!

Coca-cola has been doing some really creative marketing campaigns that have utilized a traveling truck concept (see The Happiness Truck). It’s their way of spreading happiness throughout the world…not to mention strengthening their brand!

Happiness Truck in Hong Kong (TRANSFORMERS Edition)

Happiness Truck in Mongolia

Happiness Truck in Nederland

Happiness Truck in Poland (Euro 2012 Edition)

Happiness Truck in Azerbaijan

Where will happiness strike next? Of course in Baku, Azerbaijan. A Coca-Cola delivery truck has been converted to a happiness machine, which rides through Baku streets and shares the 125 year old happiness with Azeri people.

Happiness Truck in Ucraine

Happiness Truck in Egypt (RAMADAN Edition)

Coca-Cola Egypt gives people more reasons to believe using its Happiness Truck to spread happiness and joy in Cairo making Ramadan 2011 better for all Egyptians.

Happiness Truck in Mexico


Cadbury and the Joy of Content – The story of Glass and a Half Full Productions

By 2007 Cadbury Dairy Milk (CDM) was running out of steam; facing flatlining sales, losing relevance to younger generations and with an advertising model that felt tired. The solution was to create Glass and a Half Full Productions, a content-led campaign including ‘Gorilla’, ‘Eyebrows’ and ‘Trucks’. The new direction moved CDM from being a manufacturer of chocolate to a producer of joy. It also created a debate around whether creating ‘joyful’ content rather than ‘persuasive’ advertising featuring chocolate actually works or not. The whole campaign delivered a master brand payback 171% greater than previous campaigns, with ‘Gorilla’ alone delivering an incremental revenue return of £4.88 for every £1 spent.

This case is a great example of an incredibly powerful and effective campaign in the face of a tricky market that is seasonal and unhealthy. Cadbury successfully cut through media criticism with brave but fantastic creative work that captured the public’s imagination.

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Gorilla (2007)

In 2007, Cadbury launched a new advertising campaign entitled Gorilla, from a new in-house production company called “Glass And A Half Full Productions”. The advert was premièred during the season finale of Big Brother 2007, and consists of a gorilla at a drum kit, drumming along to the Phil Collins song “In the Air Tonight”. The creative idea for the campaign is founded upon the notion that all communications should be as effortlessly enjoyable as eating the bar itself. For ‘Glass and a Half Full Productions’ is a production house that exists solely to create content that makes you feel as if you’ve just eaten a bar of Cadbury Dairy Milk. A production house that makes things that make you smile. The advert has now become extremely popular with over five million views on YouTube, and put the Phil Collins hit back into the UK charts.

“I don’t know what this has to do with Cadbury Dairy Milk, but it’s funny. Among gorilla drummers, it seems the work of Phil Collins inspires a genuine cosmic connection” Tim Nudd, ADWEEK, August 31 2007

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Richard Flintham/Juan Cabral
Director: Juan Cabral
Production Company: Blink
Producer: Matthew Fone
DoP: Dan Bronks
Editor: Joe Guest at Final Cut

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Trucks (2008)

On 28 March 2008, the second Dairy Milk advert produced by Glass and a Half Full Productions aired. The ad, entitled ‘Trucks’ features several trucks at night on an empty runway at a airport racing to the tune of Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now.

Like  “Gorilla”, Trucks is based on an offbeat concept set to a 1970s/80s rock soundtrack. It features a midnight drag race down an airport runway, using a range of vehicles including baggage transporters and motorised stairs. Trucks again highlights the skill of director Juan Cabral. It is beautifully choreographed and lit, with glossy production values and an energy that perfectly matches the music. It has a Top-Gear-meets-Wacky-Races appeal that will stand up to repeated viewings. It makes you wonder whether this is what’s going on behind the scenes at Terminal 5 – the baggage handling certainly leaves something to be desired.

According to Fallon, it took three weeks to “pimp” the trucks, the heaviest of which, the blue truck, weighed in at 25 tons. Shots of a tiny “underdog” battling against the giant provide human interest. The six-night shoot at an airport in Mexico involved 140 crew, two 35mm film cameras, two high-definition cameras and one crash-cam.

“We could have created Gorilla 2 and had him playing a trumpet,” the Cadbury marketing director, Philip Rumbol, told last Monday’s MediaGuardian section. “But that would have been too linear. It has to have a slightly enigmatic quality.”

“Trucks” therefore has a lot to live up to. It has a quirky charm, but is unlikely to change perceptions of the brand in the same way that its predecessor did. Gorilla became the ad phenomenon of last year – it was voted the public’s favourite TV ad of last year and won TV commercial of the year at the British Television Advertising Awards. It has also been credited with turning Cadbury’s fortunes around, helping the chocolate maker reverse the damage done by a 2006 salmonella scare and boost its UK market share last year. The Cadbury chief executive, Todd Stitzer, hailed 2007 as “the year of the gorilla”.

Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now was reportedly chosen for “Trucks” from a final shortlist consisting of Bon Jovi’s Living on a Prayer and Europe’s The Final Countdown. Picking the follow-up to a major hit is a notoriously tricky business. Whether Cadbury has got it right this time is open to debate, but at least it avoided the obvious “Gorilla 2” route.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Juan Cabral
Director: Juan Cabral
Production Company: Blink
Producer: Matthew Fone
DoP: Dan Bronks
Editor: Joe Guest at Final Cut

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Gorilla & Trucks – Official Remix (2008)


On 5 September 2008, the Gorilla advert was relaunched with a new soundtrack – Bonnie Tyler’s Total Eclipse of the Heart – a reference to online mash-up of the commercial. Similarly, a version of the Truck advert appeared, using Bon Jovi’s song Livin’ on a Prayer. Both remakes premiered once again during the finale of Big Brother 2008.

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Eyebrows (2009)

In January 2009, ‘Eyebrows’, the third advert in the series, was released, of two children moving their eyebrows up and down rapidly to a set electro-funk beat: “Don’t Stop the Rock” by Freestyle.

The idea: Taking that moment of joy when you seize the opportunity to get away with your own little stunt, like making a funny face as your family portrait is being taken.The ad, by agency Fallon, opens with a brother and sister – wearing a dress in the trademark Cadbury purple – sitting for what appears to be a standard school photograph session. However, when the photographer leaves the shot the boy starts an electro tune, Don’t Stop the Rock by Freestyle, on his watch.

“Over at Glass and a Half Full Productions we noticed the wriggly potential of eyebrows and thought we would have a bit of fun with them,” said the Cadbury marketing director, Phil Rumbol. “Like the other productions ‘Eyebrows’ is all about losing yourself and embracing that moment of joy … after all, everybody remembers pulling a silly face or getting up to no good as a child when backs were turned.”

The one-minute film for Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate is thought to have been viewed more than four million times on YouTube and similar sites in its first three weeks. It is twice the number of viewings racked up at the same stage by the firm’s previous cult clip, in which a gorilla plays drums to Phil Collins’s In the Air Tonight. The eyebrows advert was first shown during the final of Celebrity Big Brother on Channel 4 and is still shown on television but its online success has been boosted by various links including one from the blog of American rapper and producer Kanye West and another from celebrity gossip blogger Perez Hilton. Cadbury’s has since struck a deal with Orange to give away the soundtrack as a mobile phone ringtone, which was downloaded 125,000 times in the first 11 days.

Lee Rolston, director of marketing for Cadbury Dairy Milk, told The Observer: “Television and online are morphing almost daily. We tend to put our first ads in big things such as the Big Brother final or the X Factor, then it’s immediately online, which becomes a very fluid, organic process. People tend to interact with the films and make their own versions and their own music. We just let it go and see what people think of it.”

Chris Hassell, director of Ralph, digital design agency specialising in viral advertising, said: “I saw it online first, which is the way it works now. When someone says ‘Did you see that ad?’, the first thing you do is look it up on YouTube.”

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Richard Flintham, Chris Bovill, John Allison
Director: Tom Kuntz
Production Company: MZJ

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Dogs in Cars (2009)

Cadbury has launched the fourth A Glass and a Half Full Productions commercial, “Dogs”, featuring the music of the Blue Danube Waltz by Johann Strauss II. Dogs take turns riding in a purple Lamborghini Diablo on the Oran Park Raceway in Sydney, letting the air blow past them as they hang out the window. A Glass and A Half Full of Joy!

The fourth commercial in the Cadbury series, airing internationally, conceived by Fallon London and produced in Australia by sister Publicis shop Saatchi & Saatchi, Sydney. This spot is designed to make people smile by showing the joy when different breeds of dog enjoy the air rushing by when their heads are sticking out of an iconic Lamborghini Diablo as it races around Sydney’s Oran Park Raceway. (This spot was originally shot and aired in the UK, but because the sky was grey, the decision was made to re-shoot in OZ on a bright sunny day).

Advertising Agency: Fallon London/Saatchi & Saatchi Sydney
Creative Director: Steve Back
Production Company: Caravan @ The Feds
Director: Ben Lawrence

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Freida (2010)

In 2010 Cadbury has launched A Glass and a Half Full of Smoothness in New Zealand with tap dancing cows, doing the moves to Fred Astaire’s song, “Putting on the Ritz”. The ad screened for the first time this week during the first ad break of Desperate Housewives. The spot opens with a close up of a black and white cow’s face before heading into the slick little number. The ad finishes with the cow pushing aside mirrors and opening a purple curtain to finish with an ensemble act.. This is the first Cadbury spot in the series not conceived by Fallon, London.

The team took universally recognised ‘smooth character’, Fred Astaire, and gave his iconic dance routine the unique Cadbury touch to create another joy-filled Cadbury moment. One of the creatives told Campaign Brief: “Psyop (who did Coke Happiness Factory) are amazing to work with. We filmed two two dancers tied together to be the front and the back of the cow, then a real cow and matched all the movements in CG. It took 4 months!”
Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB, New Zealand

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Chocolate Charmer (2010)

In April 2010, a new advert aired, entitled Chocolate Charmer, containing a scientist mixing milk and chocolate to make a dairy milk bar to the tune of “The Only One I Know” by The Charlatans. This was subtly different to the others as it did not feature the ‘A Glass and a Half Full Production’ title card at the start. The 60-second TV spot takes viewers into the “magical” world of Cadbury Dairy Milk production where the chocolate charmer creates bars of milk chocolate. As the ad unfolds, the Charmer “conducts” towers of chocolate milk out of spinning glass bowls, orchestrated by levers and pulleys and his “magical powers” with chocolate.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Richard Flintham, Nils-Petter Lovgren, Filip Tyden, Dan Watt
Director: Henrik Hallgren
Production Company: The Moving Picture Company

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Ostrich (2010)

The spot continues Cadbury’s ‘Glass and a Half Full Productions’ concept, which began with Fallon’s Dairy Milk TV ad ‘Gorilla’ in the UK in 2007.

The TVC was created by Saatchi & Saatchi Johannesburg. Their Executive Creative Director, Adam Wittert, says, “The brief was to make people feel the same joy they experience when they eat Cadbury Dairy Milk, so we came up with the idea of an ostrich and an ostrich, being a bird, would find the ultimate joy in flying. So our ostrich goes sky diving.”

The ad begins with an ostrich walking purposefully through a stack of wooden crates. It then becomes apparent that he is in the cargo hold of an airplane; the cargo door gradually opens and the ostrich takes a leap into the air like a sky diver, with the song “I gotta be me” by Sammy Davis Jr coming to a crescendo. The ostrich gleefully flies through the sky into the sunset, before pulling the ripchord to his Cadbury-branded parachute at the last minute, with the strapline ‘A glass and a half full of joy’ appearing beneath.

Saatchi & Saatchi Johannesburg managing director, Grant Meldrum, said that the Johannesburg office worked closely with Saatchi & Saatchi Fallon in the UK: “This ensured that we produced a TV commercial that would have global appeal and, at the same time, underpinned the possibilities of achieving pure joy and remained true to the brand’s proposition.”

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Johannesburg
Creative: Adam Wittert, Keisha Meyerson, Bruce Murphy
Director: Peter Truckel
Production Company: Catapult Commercials

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Dancing Clothes (2011)

In April 2011, a new advert aired, known as ‘Charity Shop’ or ‘Dancing Clothes’, featuring dancing clothes at a charity shop to the tune of  We Don’t Have to Take Our Clothes Off  by Jermaine Stewart. This exposed the song to a new generation who downloaded the track and returned the song to the UK Top 40 so far reaching no. 29. This ad also marks the return of the Glass and a Half Full title card.

The ad, created by Fallon, features dancing clothes in an initially lifeless charity shop. Individual clothes fall from the rails, rise from the floor and burst from cupboards, and the charity shop is transformed into a dancing extravaganza. Julie Reynolds, marketing manager for Cadbury Dairy Milk, said: “For us Cadbury Dairy Milk is about creating moments of joy that make people smile. We believe this production is another great way of doing just that.”

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Augusto Sola, Sam Hibbard
Director: Megaforce
Production Company: Riff Raff Films

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Monks (2011)

Cadbury Dairy Milk Chocolate has a long heritage of giving joy. In this experience we highlight how people in a strict and disciplined environment break out and let loose when Cadbury’s drops in. It’s the equivalent of the drill sergeant cutting the troop a break, or a strict boarding school nun letting the bunking girls off. When our stern teacher is given the opportunity to teach his pupils a lesson, he shows them how to let loose. Pretty soon the whole class is laughing, dancing and thoroughly enjoying themselves as much as the people witnessing this moment of joy.

Filmed entirely on location in rural China, the commercial captures a surreal moment of pure joy in a Buddhist monastery. A temple gathering takes a new turn with the addition of purple helium-filled balloons, with the monks released to groove to the sounds of Flo Rida track “Low”, starting with the chorus line, “apple bottom jeans, boots with the fur”.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Augusto Sola, Sam Hibbard
Director: Megaforce
Production Company: Riff Raff Films


Christmas Letter for Santa: the most awarded Toys & Games Ads

PICTIONARY – Quick Draw Wins Campaign




Advertising Agency: Ogilvy Malaysia
Executive Creative Director: Gavin Simpson
Copywriter: Adam Chan, Donevan Chew
Art director: Yee Wai Khuen, Tan Chee Keong
Illustrator: Milx
Year: 2011
Gold Lion for the campaign

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SCRABBLE – Elephant/Guitar/Submarine/Camera/Samurai

Advertising Agency: JWT Chile
Executive Creative Director: Leo Farfan, Matias Lecaros, Sergio Rosati
Copywriter: Matias Lecaros
Art director: Matias Lecaros
Photographer: Cristian Gastelo
Year: 2009
Silver Lion for the campaign

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LEGO – Caterpillar/Monster/Whale


Advertising Agency: Ogilvy Malaysia
Executive Creative Director: Gavin Simpson/Robert Gaxiola
Creative Director: Eric Yeo
Copywriter: Greg Rawson/Ross Fowler
Art Director: David Stevanov
Year: 2011
Silver Lion for the campaign
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PLAYSTATION 2 – Boxer/Soldier

Advertising Agency: BBDO Chile
Creative Director: Cristian Schinadeermann
Copywriter: Matias Lopez, Marcelo Correa
Art Director: Emerson Navarrete, Fernando Riveros
Photographer: Lautaro
Typographer: Ricardo Salamanca
Year: 2006
Gold Lion for the Campaign

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LEGO – Accountant/Electrician/Engineer

Advertising Agency: Serviceplan, Munich
Executive Creative Director:Matthias Harbeck
Creative Director: Alex Schill/Oliver Palmer
Copywriter: Frank Seiler
Art Director: Sandra Loibl/Julia Koch
Year: 2011
Bronze Lion for the campaign

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 LEGO – Spaceship/Beetle/Deep Ocean Explorer

Advertising agency: Leo Burnett, Moscow
Creative Director: Mikhail Kudashkin
Art Director: Arina Avdeena
Copywriter: Rodrigo Linhaners
Year: 2011
Gold Lion for the campaign

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HOT WHEELS – Big Boy


Advertising agency: Ogilvy Mexico
Creative Director: Miguel Angel Ruiz
Copywriter: Abraham Quintana
Art Director: Ivan Carrasco, Mario Salgado, Jaime Gonzales
Year: 2010
Bronze Lion

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MACHBOX – Ant


Advertising agency: Ogilvy Brazil
Creative Director: Zuza Tupinamba
Copywriter: Zuza Tupinamba
Art Director: Marcos Paolo Juliano
Year: 2001
Silver Lion

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MACHBOX – Mustang/Eldorado/Fleetwood


Advertising agency: Ogilvy Frankfurt
Creative Director: Stephan Vogel
Copywriter: Stephan Lenz
Art Director: Marco Weber
Year: 2008
Gold Lion for the campaign

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SPHERE ACTION FIGURES – Pararescue Jumper/16 Air Assault/7th Marines/Desert Rats


Advertising agency: TBWA/Singapore
Creative Director: Mark Bamfield
Copywriter: Robert Kleman, John Sheterline
Art Director: Marcus Rebeschini
Year: 2004
Gold Lion for the campaign

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GAMEBOY ADVANCE – Prison

Advertising agency: Lowe Brindfors, Stockholm
Creative Director: Hakan Engler
Copywriter: Johan Holmstrom
Art Director: Richard Villar
Year: 2005
Gold Lion for the campaign

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MEDAL OF HONOR (EA Games) – Goodbye/Proud Mother/Back Home

Advertising agency: FP7 Doha
Creative Director: Fadi Yaish
Copywriter: Kalpesh Patankar
Art Director: Kalpesh Patankar
Year: 2008
Gold Lion for the campaign

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Rebirth


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: Jorge Carreno
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2003
Grand Prix in Press Lions

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Veteran


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: Jorge Carreno
Photographer: Marc Gouby
Year: 2003
Silver Lion for the campaign

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Doll


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Potato Head


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Manoelle Van Der Vaeren
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 –  Adultery


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Moulds


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Manoelle Van Der Vaeren
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Plugs


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Matthew Branning
Art Director: Chris Garbut
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Scars


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Baby


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Xander Smith
Art Director: Javier Rodriguez
Photographer: Yann Robert
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 –  Sleeping Beauty


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Photographer: Eugenio Recuenco
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Head


Advertising Agency: TBWA Paris
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Sebastien Vacherot/Jessica Jerard- Huet/Loic Cardon/Ingrid Varetz
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot/Jessica Jerard- Huet/Loic Cardon/Ingrid Varetz
Photographer: Yann Robert
Production Company: DEF 2 Shoot, Paris
Director: Thomas Marque
Year: 2006
Gold Lion

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PLAYSTATION PSP – Handcuffed


Advertising Agency: TBWA Espana, Madrid
Creative Director: Juan Sanchez/Guillermo Gines
Copywriter: Vincente Rodriguez
Art Director: Bernardo Hernandez
Year: 2008
Silver Lion

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PLAYSTATION 2 – Welcome


Advertising Agency: TBWA Espana, Madrid
Creative Director: Angel Iglesias/Guillermo Gines/Agustin Vaquero
Copywriter: Guillermo Gines
Art Director: Angel Iglesias
Year: 2005
Silver Lion

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LEGO – Street Building


Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Santiago
Creative Director: Cesar Agost Carreno
Copywriter: Felipe Manalich
Art Director: Sergio Iacobelli/Sebastian Alvarado
Photographer: Juab Carlos Sotello
Year: 2005
Grand Prix (Outdoor Lions)

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LEGO – Periscope


Agency: FCB Johannesburg
Creative Director: Bret Morris
Copywriter: Lance Vinning
Art Director: Lance Vinning/Charles Foley
Photographer: Gerard Turnley
Year: 2006
Grand Prix (Press Lions)

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LEGO – Fire Station/Hangar/Train Station


Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore
Creative Director: Andy Greenway
Copywriter: Stuart Harricks/Roger Makak
Art Director: Stuart Harricks
Photographer: Dean Zillwood/IDC
Year: 2006
Silver Lion for the campaign

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LEGO – Builders of tomorrow

Advertising Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg
Creative Director: Arno Lindemann/Bernhard Lukas
Copywriter: Daniel Schaeferk
Art Director: Szymon Rose
Photographer: Achim Lippoth
Year: 2007
Gold Lion

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SCRABBLE – Beautiful World Campaign

Advertising Agency: Ogilvy & Mother France
Creative Director: Chris Garbutt
Copywriter: Arnaud Vanhelle, Benjamin Bregeault, Mihnea Gheorghiu
Art Director: Antoaneta Metchanova, Alex Daff, Najin Ha
Year: 2008
Silver Lion for the campaign

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PLAYSTATION PSP – Guide Dog

Advertising Agency: TBWA/Madrid
Creative Director: Juan Sanchez/Guillermo Gines
Copywriter: Vincente Rodriguez
Art Director: Hely 
Sanchez
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion
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TAMIYA MODEL KITS – LightsBulb/Frog/Watermelon


Advertising Agency: Creative Juice G1/TBWA, Bangkok
Creative Director: Thirasak Tanapatanakul/Prangthip Praditpong
Art Director: Kittitat Larppitakpong/Jon Chalerwong/Thirasak Tanapatanakul
Copywriter: Nutchanun Ciaphanumas
Photographer: Anuchai Sricharunputong/Nok
Year: 2005
Gold Lion and Silver Lion for the campaign (Press&Outdoor)


Lego (1981/2011) – Builders of Creativity

KIPPER

An extremely clever ad — one from your childhood. A slightly surreal look at all the things you can make out of a box a Lego. Narrated by Tommy Cooper, a battle ensues between a mouse which, when threatened by a cat, turns into a dog. The cat turns into a dragon and so on, to a submarine and a submarine-eating kipper. The submarine eventually morphs into an elephant, the mouse rebuilds and the elephant faints. Lego: It’s a new toy every day — just like that!
Agency: TBWA London
Creative: Mike Cozens; Graham Watson
Director: Ken Turner
Production: Clearwater Films
Producer: David Mitten
Director of Photography: Tom Harrison
Editor: Patrick Udale
Year: 1981
Grand Prix

FAMOUS CHILDREN
Lego representations of famous people: a dinosaur (Spielberg), a bed (Madonna), a football (Pele), windows (Bill Gates), a man levitating (David Copperfield), a broken man (Mike Tyson).
Agency: DM9 Publicidade
Creative Director: Nizan Guanaes
Copywriter: Nizan Guanaes
Production Company: Jodaf/Joao Daniel Film
Director: Joao Daniel Tikhmoiroff
Year: 1995
Gold Lion

BRAIN

Agency: JWT Publicidade
Creative Director: Anselmo Candido
Copywriter: Ricardo Adolfo
Art Director: Miguel Coimbra
Photographer: Chico Prata
Year: 1998
Bronze Lion

BOX
A group of officials arrive at the house of an ordinary boy to discover that he’s created something extraordinary, which he keeps in a box. All ideas start with imagination.
Agency: BBH
Creative Director: John Hegarty
Copywriter: Roger Beckett
Art Director: Andrew Smart
Photographer: Gorgeous Enterprises
Director: Frank Budgen
Year: 1999
Bronze Lion

SHELF

Headline: All toys, in one
Agency: DPZ Propaganda
Creative Director: Jose Zaragoza/Carlos Rocca
Copywriter: Giovana Madalosso
Art Director: Janaina Pergira
Photographer: Lucio Cunha
Year: 2002
Shortlist

WALL

Headline: The power of the brick
Agency: Lowe, New York
Creative Director: Gary Goldsmith/Dean Hacohen/Bruce Hopman
Art Director: Elizabeth Maertens
Year: 2002

ARROW/HAND

Headline: The most interactive toy.
Agency: DPZ, San Paulo
Creative Director: Carlos Silverio/Francesco Petit
Copywriter: Roberto Kilciauskas
Art Director: Fernanda Fajardo
Photographer: Marcel Vieira
Year: 2004
Shortlist

STREET BUILDING

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Santiago
Creative Director: Cesar Agost Carreno
Copywriter: Felipe Manalich
Art Director: Sergio Iacobelli/Sebastian Alvarado
Photographer: Juab Carlos Sotello
Year: 2005
Grand Prix (Outdoor Lions)

PERISCOPE/CAT

Agency: FCB Johannesburg
Creative Director: Bret Morris
Copywriter: Lance Vinning
Art Director: Lance Vinning/Charles Foley
Photographer: Gerard Turnley
Year: 2006
Grand Prix (Press Lions)

FIRE STATION/HANGAR/TRAIN STATION

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore
Creative Director: Andy Greenway
Copywriter: Stuart Harricks/Roger Makak
Art Director: Stuart Harricks
Photographer: Dean Zillwood/IDC
Year: 2006
Silver Lion for the campaign (Press)/Bronze Lion for the campaign (Outdoor)

BOX

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore
Creative Director: Andy Greenway
Copywriter: Stuart Harricks/Roger Makak
Art Director: Stuart Harricks
Photographer: Sam & Boomerang
Year: 2006
Shortlist

COSTRUCTION SITE

Describe the communication goal
LEGO wanted their communication to focus more strongly on the core product: the basic blocks. And at the same time, they still wanted to inspire children of all ages and to stimulate creativity and innovation.
Innovative Media Strategy
Construction sites are normally very boring and makes the surroundings ugly. But by turning the containers placed there into giant LEGO blocks it gave consumers a surprise, making their everyday life a bit more colourful and creative. They could “play on” themselves and start imaging how to build on. As one consumer said: “I was just standing there, waiting for a giant boy to come and build”. The media became the talk of the town. Even the Mayor of Copenhagen was proud of what it did to the city and praised it in several newspapers and television.
Engaging Creativity
LEGO is known for stimulating creativity. Transforming containers on construction sites across the country into giant, colourful LEGO blocks confirmed this for the consumer. And with no logos it also became a pleasent surprise in their everyday life. Was it and ad or wasn’t it? Nobody doubted that LEGO was the brand behind it though.
Encompassing the Audience
By turning containers into outstanding giant LEGO blocks it gave consumers a big surprise, making their everyday life more colourful and creative. In several weeks, the LEGO blocks became the talk of the town.
Effectiveness
– Massive media coverage in more than 20 national newspapers and magazines, national television and radio
– City mayors praising the project
– Hundreds of thousands consumers travelling by the blocks led to maximum awareness on the communication goal.
Agency: ADVANCE, Copenhagen
Copywriter: Michael Pedersen
Art Director: Kenneth Opsund
Year: 2006
ShortlistCOSTRUCTION
Agency: IDB/FCB Santiago
Creative Director: Rodrigo Gomez/Michael Angel Cerdeira
Copywriter: Rodrigo Figueroa
Art Director: Michael Angel Cerdeira
Year: 2006
ShortlistBUILDERS OF TOMORROW
The image is a tribute to “Lunch atop a Skyscraper (New York Construction Workers Lunching on a Crossbeam)”, a photograph taken by Charles C. Ebbets on the 69th floor during construction of the GE Building at Rockefeller Center in 1932.
Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg

Creative Director: Arno Lindemann/Bernhard Lukas
Copywriter: Daniel Schaeferk
Art Director: Szymon Rose
Photographer: Achim Lippoth
Year: 2007
Gold LionPLANE/DINOSAUR/BOAT/TANK

Agency: Blattler Brunner, Pittsburg
Creative Director: Jay Giesen/Dave Kwasnick
Art Director: Derek Julin
Year: 2007

POLYPLAYPYLENE

Describe the objective of the promotion.
Like no other toy, LEGO is a symbol of fun and creativity. To mark the fiftieth birthday of LEGO in Germany, the idea was to rekindle media representatives’ and LEGO partners’ excitement for LEGO with a high-quality mailing.
Describe how the promotion developed from concept to implementation.
LEGO fan and designer Reginald Wagner conceived, designed and photographed his personal LEGO memories with a pinhole camera to keep them from fading. The book’s format is adapted from the form of an individual LEGO brick. The book cover and the flipside are made of real LEGO plates. Journalists were sent the book and could put their name on the cover and share their memories with the designer.
Explain why the method of promotion was most relevant to the product or service.
The title of the book POLYPLAYPYLENE means “plastic that has been played with often” and that’s precisely what this book is about. Endless imagination, an endless number of construction combinations and stories from the LEGO worlds: towns, castles and space.
Describe the success of the promotion with both client and consumer including some quantifiable results.
The first, exclusive edition is out of print; the feedback was overwhelming. A paperback edition of “Polyplaypylene” is currently in print for wider circulation.
Agency: Kolle Rebbe Werbeagentur GmbH/Korefe
Creative Director: Katrin Oeding
Copywriter: Alexander Barom
Art Director: Reginald Wagner
Photographer: Reginald Wargner
Year: 2007
Shortlist

CONTROL

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Santiago
Executive Creative Director: Sebastian Alvarado/Nicolas Lopez
Creative Director: Felipe Manalich
Copywriter: Felipe Manalich
Art Director: Felipe Manalich/Sebastian Alvarado
Year: 2008
Shortlist (Press)/Shortlist (Outdoor)RUBIK’S CUBE/BRICK
Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg
Creative Director: Jan Rexhausen
Art Director: Keat Aun Tan
Photographer: Keat Aun Tan
Year: 2008
ShorlistWALL/TANK/ALI

Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg
Creative Director: Fabien Frese/Daniel Frericks/Gotz Ulmer
Copywriter: Sergio Penzo
Art Director: Andre Price
Photographer: Ragnar Schmuck
Year: 2009
ShorlistDRUG/SEX/VIOLENCE
Agency: Naga DDB/Rapp Malaysia
Creative Director: Alvin Teoh
Copywriter: Raymond Ng/Ted Lim
Art Director: Chow Kok Keong
Photographer: Chem Kim Mun (360 Degree Studio)
Year: 2009
ShorlistDRAGON/PIRATES/SPACESHIP
Headline: It start with a brick
Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore
Creative Director: Richard Copping/Andrew Pech
Copywriter: Andrew Pech
Art Director: Jon Loke/ichard Copping
Photographer: Teo Chai Guan
Year: 2009

CREATE THE IMPOSSIBLE

Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg
Creative Director: Thim Wagner/Daniel Frericks/Gotz Ulmer
Copywriter: Mathias Muller
Art Director: Damjan Pita/Alexander Musgens
Year: 2009

LEGO STAR WARS

Advertising School: Escola Cuca, Sao Paolo
Students: Diego Mourau/Gustavo Dorietto/Lucas Mohallem
Year: 2011

CATERPILLAR/MONSTER/WHALE


Agency: Ogilvy Malaysia
Executive Creative Director: Gavin Simpson/Robert Gaxiola
Creative Director: Eric Yeo
Copywriter: Greg Rawson/Ross Fowler
Art Director: David Stevanov
Year: 2011
Silver Lion for the campaign

ACCOUNTANT/ELECTRICIAN/ENGINEER

Agency: Serviceplan, Munich
Executive Creative Director:Matthias Harbeck
Creative Director: Alex Schill/Oliver Palmer
Copywriter: Frank Seiler
Art Director: Sandra Loibl/Julia Koch
Year: 2011
Bronze Lion for the campaign

SPACESHIP/BEETLE/DEEP OCEAN EXPLORER

Agency: Leo Burnett, Moscow
Creative Director: Mikhail Kudashkin
Art Director: Arina Avdeena
Copywriter: Rodrigo Linhaners
Year: 2011
Gold Lion for the campaign

BRICK THIEF

Agency: Pereira & O’Dell, San Francisco
Executive Creative Director: PJ Pereira
Creative Director: Kash Sree
Copywriter: Jaime Robinson
Art Director: Jason Apaliski
Production Company: Stimmung, Santa Monica
Director: Blue Source
Year: 2011
Shortlist

ARMCHAIR/CAR

Creatives: Jacques Denain, Nicolas Dumenil
Year: 2011

WORDS PUZZLE CAMPAIGN: CROCODILE/SPACESHIP/TRACTOR

Advertising Agency: TBWA, Costa Rica
Creative Director: Byron Balmaceda
Art Director: Gabriela Soto
Copywriter: Byron Balmaceda
Illustrator: Gabriela Soto
Year: 2011

BRICK Campaign

The ads appeared on four consecutive pages. LEGO is a company that has fostered imagination, invention and creativity for over 60 years. So it is unusual for these ads to feature only long copy with minimal imagery. However, upon reading each of these scenarios the ad comes to life in a way that is unique only to the reader and how they see these playtime scenarios in their mind’s eye. Typographic elements of kerning contrasted with tracking allow the reader to almost get lost in the copy selecting keywords for their imagination. The fourth ad in the series, “Yellow Brick” features a notepad with the tagline “Every LEGO brick tells a story. Build yours.”

Advertising Agency: Pereira & O’Dell, Brazil
Chief Creative Officer: PJ Pereira
Creative Director / Copywriter: Aricio Fortes
Creative Director / Art Director: Paulo Coelho
Account Executive: Lo Braz
Illustrator: Eduardo Gomes
Year: 2012