Leo Burnett Italy for WWF: Pets4Pets Project – Advertising thought by kids to get adults thinking

What about asking youngsters, instead of experienced creative directors, to create the strongest communication campaigns?

1_Pets4pets

Pets4Pets Project  taught little kids the secrets of the advertising industry; inviting them to imagine new social campaigns to help protect the animals they love the most. WWF, together with a team of creatives, photographers, illustrators, film directors, animators, post-producers and speakers helped students at an elementary school experience the whole creative process: from the brief, to the Pre Production Meeting, to the shooting, to going on-air. The result? Well see for yourself in the case video.

Schermata 12-2456643 alle 11.53.52

The adventure starts in the classroom, then moves inside the creative agency and finally arrives on a production set. For all the experienced creatives there’s just one strict rule: “never ‘contaminate’ the kids’ ideas”, just offer them the production advice they lack. First Challenge: a print campaign.

WWFstampe6

WWFstampe7

WWFstampe3

WWFstampe4

WWFstampe5

Second Challenge: a TV commercial.

The results

Schermata 12-2456643 alle 11.53.45

“From the first sketch on a piece of paper, to 2 TV commercials, 4 radio announcements and 8 print campaigns, ready to go on-air”. For every creative piece, you can see the “before” and “after”: from the kids’ original sketches to the final executions ready to go on-air. One thing is immediately evident: the kids’ work is already 100% creatively effective.
The team of professionals just helped them “translate” their ideas into a language that adults can understand.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett Italy
Executive Creative Director: Francesco Bozza
Associate Creative Director: Andrea Marzagalli
Creative Team: Andrea Stanich, Sergio Spaccavento, Paolo Boccardi, Alice Crippa, Serena Micieli, Silvia Savoia
Executive Producer: Debora Magnavacca
Year: 2013


RKCR/Y&R, London for Virgin Atlantic – Flying in the Face of Ordinary

“The people at Virgin Atlantic are what make it special. I’m proud of every single one of them. See how we are flying in the face of ordinary in our new ad above.” Richard Branson, Founder of Virgin Group

virgin-atlantic-flying-in-the-face-of-ordinary

Virgin Atlantic is “Flying in the Face of Ordinary”  with its new global brand proposition. THe campaign brings to life Virgin Atlantic’s innovative and pioneering spirit, capturing the airline’s passion for flight and demonstrating how Virgin Atlantic goes beyond the norm to deliver unforgettable experiences for its passengers.

As a child, could you catch fish with your bare hands while standing knee deep in the local river? Did you have uncanny, almost otherworldly powers of clairvoyance that let you glimpse the future—and even change it for the better? Could you make paper airplanes before you could crawl?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you should stop what you’re doing and go work at Virgin Atlantic.

All sorts of outlandishly precocious children grow up to become Virgin Atlantic workers in RKCR/Y&R’s stylish, fantastical, tongue-in-cheek launch spot for the carrier’s new global campaign. Styled as a kind of faux movie trailer—cut into 30-, 60- and 90-second TV edits, as well as a cinema version and a two-minute online spot—the spot celebrates the airline’s staff as literal superheroes. Their special gifts include rapid reflexes, preternatural intuition, creative problem solving and heightened empathy. Naturally, as adults, they rendezvous in Virgin’s ranks as cabin crew, ground staff, designers and pilots.

The tagline: “Virgin Atlantic. Flying in the face of ordinary.”

Webstill-1_0007_003

Launched with the new year, the campaign is unapologetically nostalgic and retro, but knowingly so. Air travel hasn’t been glamorous in decades, yet Virgin brings back some of that attitude—along with the attendant fashion and sex appeal—but in a way that’s exaggerated and borders on self-parody. Promising superhuman staff, in the end, is no promise at all. But in typical Virgin style, the carrier builds the whole campaign around such false claims, and expects you to quit worrying and just enjoy it. And it works—largely due to the skillful direction by Partizan’s Antoine Bardou-Jacquet.

The airline explicitly wants to “bring the glamour and fun back into long-haul travel,” says Simon Lloyd, its director of marketing. Mark Roalfe, chairman and executive creative director at RKCR/Y&R, adds: “We wanted to bring to life that special spark that makes the people at Virgin different. I think the film really captures that, but with the tongue-in-cheek tone of voice that we’ve built with Virgin over the last 18 years.”

Sir Richard Branson, President of Virgin Atlantic said: “We’re always on the lookout for gifted young people to grow our business. Our staff hold the keys to the future of Virgin Atlantic, they work so hard and we are delighted to dedicate this new advert to them.

“At a time of soaring youth unemployment, our advertisement is a powerful New Year message encouraging everyone to look again at young people and the talents they have to offer to businesses and industries all over the country. People are at the heart of Virgin Atlantic and we believe this advert celebrates this”.

True glamour may be gone from air travel for good. But in the ads, if nothing else, you can still count on Virgin to make it fun.

Webstill-1_0004_006

Webstill-1_0003_007

VFX Supervisor Rob Walker said, “It was great working with Antoine and Rainey Kelly. The guys came to us with some really cool ideas for us to realize, such as a little boy catching live fish with his bare hands. We had an intensive shoot in South Africa and a challenging deadline to meet, but this was the perfect job for MPC as it combined all of our disciplines.”

We’ve had an excellent team working on this project, everyone’s dedication and passion has helped to craft a wonderful piece of work. Our CG department has created holograms, paper planes, an aircraft and a DNA sequence. We’ve also completed extensive rig removal, multiple pass compositing and DMP work to embellish and create environments”

Advertising Agency: RKCR/Y&R, London
Executive Creative Director: Mark Roalfe
Creative Partners: Pip Bishop, Chris Hodgkiss
Production Company: Partizan
Service Company: Stillking
Director: Antoine Bardou-Jacquet
Year: 2012


Grey New York for Canon Eos – What would you do to get the perfect shot?

The world is filled with beautiful moments worth capturing. You just have to see them. Also, buy a Canon Rebel T4i camera and carry it with you all the time. That way, whenever inspiration strikes, you’ll be ready to snap a photo you can save forever. Also, Canon will sell more Canon Rebels.

“Inspired” is a new ad for the brand from Grey in New York features a montage of adventurous photographers braving environmental hazards to get that special shot. The spot does a particularly nice job of portraying the product users as the heroes of the story: their antics are by varying degrees entertaining (trying to outrun a charging giraffe, staring down an irate fishmonger) and stupid-dangerous (climbing to the edge of an icy roof to get a better angle on the kid making snow angels in an empty pool). The resulting pictures are all marvelous, and so is the filming of the spot itself, showing all the right attention to detail—e.g., the birthday girl’s sideway glance when her mom nonchalantly sweeps a bowl off the table to get it out of the frame.

The director, Nicolai Fuglsig, also shot Fallon’s Balls spot. He appears to have an affinity for steep roads and the effects of gravity on unusual objects—in that case innumerable bouncy balls, and in this case a flaming tire. The soundtrack is Rachel Fannan of the California rock group Only You singing a charmingly understated version of the easily mawkish classic “Beautiful Dreamer,” and it’s pretty much perfect for the spot. Canon or someone should probably post or sell the whole song somewhere obvious soon. People are going to want to hear it.

Figuring out how exactly the lofty tagline, “Long live imagination,” ties into an ad about making concrete records of inspiring moments may take a few steps of abstraction. But in the end, it does make sense, and the conceit, with all its overtones of creativity and immortality, is pretty much dead-on for an ad aimed at people who want to be artists.
Advertising Agency: Grey, New York
Chief Creative Officer: Tor Myhren
Executive Creative Directors: Ari Halper, Steve Krauss
Creative Directors: Stu Mair, Dave Cuccinello
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Nicolai Fuglsig
Year: 2012


Microsoft Xbox/Halo3 – The Believe Campaign

 “A hero is more than a person, a hero is a belief. A belief that, against impossible odds, the world can be saved—and that the world is still worth saving. Heroes inspire that belief in us. They renew our faith and give us that most precious of all gifts—hope. The world  needs heroes. That’s why, when a true hero arrives, the world will honor him.— Xbox.com introduction of “Believe”.

In a bid to reach new audience for Halo franchise for the release of Halo 3, a futuristic human versus aliens science fiction videogame, McCann and T.A.G. in San Francisco came up with this complex integrated campaign that utilizes both film and online advertising. They created a large diorama that documented a historic battle, which was filmed for tv and cinema spots. An interactive flythrough tour of the diorama was then also placed online. It was all intended to present Halo as a story with real emotion. “Our objective was to use every medium we could to communicate the simple idea that Master Chief (the hero of the game) is a true hero to all humankind” says John Patroulis, creative Director at T.A.G.

“The goal was to make this the biggest title lunch in Xbox history” Patroulis continues. “And we went about it by executing a global campaign that used absolutely no game footage, starred either plastic figures or old men in its films, used classic music as its soundtrack, and almost never showed Master Chief”

“The ability to really move people is limited in a 30- or even 60-second TV spot, but the chance of something that’s more interactive or longer format…that’s the same feeling you get as after you’ve gone through a story or an experience and that’s what moves people... – Taylor Smith, Global Communications Director, Xbox

Halo 3 became the fastest pre-selling game in history and made 170 million in sales on its first day, the biggest launch in entertainment history.

Halo 3 – Believe

Halo3 Short Film 1 – Enemy Weapon

Halo3 Short Film 2 – Museum

Halo3 Short Film 3 – Hunted

Halo3  Short Film 4 – Gravesite

Halo3 Documentary – The John 117 Monument


Freddy Krueger (and Nightmare on Elm Street) in advertising

Yamaha

Burger King/Open Late

Picasso (Bed & Mattresses)

GSC/Developers against Piracy

Horror Night at Playcenter

Nulaid Eggs

Screamfest (Independent Horor Film Festival)

Post-it notes

Fonzies Chips

MTV/Nightmare on Elm Street Campaign

During some ads for America’s Best Dance Crew, Freddy Krueger comes out of nowhere and interrupts them as a way to advertise A Nightmare on Elm Street.

Direct TV


BETC Euro RSCG for Sci Fi Channel – Adopt Sci Fi (Integrated Campaign)

In 2008 BETC Euro RSCG created this integrated campaign, which incorporated ambient, radio, press, film and on-line elements, to raise awareness of the Sci Fi Channel in France. The campaign was based around ten alien “children” toys that were placed in different locations acros eight French cities. Fans were then encouraged to search for them by following clues found on a website and in radio ads. Posters were also displayed around towns to advertise the website. The intention was to create an emotional link between the Brand and people who were not already fans of science fiction. Each alien found earned its rescuer a reward of 500 euros. When nine of the figures had been located it was revealed that the tenth had been placed in an orphanage, where it could be interacted with via a website and a page on Facebook.

The treasure hunt apect of the campaign appealed to fans of the Sci Fi Channel, while also attracting new viewers to the brand.


Advertising Agency: BETC Euro RSCG, Paris
Year: 2008


Wieden + Kennedy for Facebook – The Things That Connect Us

Today, Faceboook announced that it had reached its billion-user milestone, and to celebrate, it has launched a poetic film from its agency of record, Wieden & Kennedy in Portland, Ore.

The film, titled “The Things That Connect Us,” opens with a series of artful, emotional vignettes of people sitting and interacting on chairs — before moving on to other objects and events through which folks come together, such as a doorbell, airplanes, bridges or a basketball game. The point being, that all these things exist, perhaps, to remind us that we’re not alone. It was created by Wieden & Kennedy, Portland, Ore., which Facebook today also unveiled as its global agency of record.

“What we’re trying to articulate is that we as humans exist to connect, and we at Facebook to facilitate and enable that process,” explained Rebecca Van Dyck, a former exec for Apple and Levi’s who joined Facebook as head of consumer marketing in February. “We make the tools and services that allow people to feel human, get together, open up. Even if it’s a small gesture, or a grand notion — we wanted to express that huge range of connectivity and how we interact with each other.”

Although it seems to mark a single moment, it’s a vital component of a branding strategy that’s been a year in the making, one not originally intended to coincide with the social network’s milestone moment.

“This started long before we knew we were going to reach a billion,” said Ms. Van Dyck. “We started thinking about this a year ago and approached Wieden & Kennedy to help us craft a message that articulated our values and who we are. It wasn’t until recently that we realized we were close to reaching 1 billion, and we thought what an amazing way to honor our users, to create this piece for them.”

The film launched this morning globally, with an introduction from founder Mark Zuckberg. Ms. Van Dyck said Facebook will also be using its various ad products, including premium page posts and sponsored stories, for the rollout. “We’ll be able to walk the footsteps of what our advertisers go through,” she said.

Although Wieden & Kennedy had previously worked with Ms. Van Dyck while she was at Levi’s, she said the agency preceded her arrival at Facebook and was brought in by Brand Creative Lead Jessica Sittig when the company started to consider a bigger consumer-facing push.

In developing the idea, Wieden Creative Director Karl Lieberman said the agency spent months meeting with Facebook staffers and getting to know the company. “We tried to figure out what it is that the company’s really interested in,” he said. “There’s a quote by David Kennedy that I really love: ‘Great brands don’t talk about themselves, they talk about what they really love.’ If you follow that blueprint, you’ll realize that Facebook loves things that are social. It finds it interesting and essential that there’s this innate, human desire to connect.”

The film was directed by Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu of Anonymous Content, who directed the critically acclaimed film “Amores Perros” as well as previous high-profile Wieden projects like Nike’s “Write the Future” and the Emmy-awarded “Best Job” Olympics spot for P&G. The agency chose him for his ability to add emotional depth to an idea that on paper, was “almost academic, anthropological,” said Mr. Lieberman. “We knew we needed Alejandro to take a simple, logical argument and bring a true sense of humanity to it. We didn’t want it to feel critical, as the words are pretty straight, so we wanted him to drop that layer of real human emotion on top of it.”

“One of the things that we were really excited about was that he creates epic pieces of film but he can capture the smallest gesture of intimacy and connections, and that was going to be really important for us to get across in a short amount of time,” Ms. Van Dyck added.

In terms of tone, since this would be Facebook’s first major marketing message, “Facebook wanted to speak in a significant, but humble way,” said Mr. Lieberman. “We thought that starting off with chairs really did that. We don’t think about chairs a lot, but you can if you want. You can spend $5 on a chair, or $5,000. They could be incredibly ordinary, or incredibly sophisticated. We thought it was a humble but interesting way for Facebook to start talking about itself.”

Continuing in the humble vein, the ad makes no mention of the billion-user landmark. “We wanted to use 1 billion as the platform and the moment in time, but we didn’t want to turn the message to be back about us in any way,” said Ms. Van Dyck. “We like the idea of using the context of the moment but we wanted the piece to be thoughtful and to be about our users.”

Going forward, Ms. Van Dyck couldn’t disclose any specific marketing plans but said the efforts will continue with the help of Wieden. “The best marketing that we have is people coming to Facebook every day connecting with their friends, families, local business, but every once in a while we’re going to want to define for ourselves who we are and share our values,” she said. “You’re seeing that from us today and it’s a conversation we want to continue with our consumers.”

Zuckerberg gave an additional explanation after announcing Facebook had reached 1 billion active users:

“Celebrating a billion people is very special to me,” he said. “It’s a moment to honor the people we serve. For the first time in our history, we’ve made a brand video to express what our place is on this earth. We believe that the need to open up and connect is what makes us human. It’s what brings us together. It’s what brings meaning to our lives. Facebook isn’t the first thing people have made to help us connect. We belong to a rich tradition of people making things that bring us together. Today, we honor this tradition. We honor the humanity of the people we serve. We honor the everyday things people have always made to bring us together: Chairs, doorbells, airplanes, bridges, games. These are all things that connect us. And now Facebook is a part of this tradition of things that connect us too. I hope you enjoy this video as much as we do. Thanks for helping connect a billion people.”

This is the script:

Chairs. Chairs are made so that people can sit down and take a break. Anyone can sit on a chair and, if the chair is large enough, they can sit down together. And tell jokes. Or make up stories. Or just listen.

Chairs are for people. And that is why chairs are like Facebook.

Doorbells. Airplanes. Bridges. These are things people use to get together, so they can open up and connect about ideas and music and other things that people share.

Dance floors. Basketball. A great nation. A great nation is something people build so they can have a place where they belong.

The Universe. It is vast and dark. And it makes us wonder if we are alone. So maybe the reason we make all of these things is to remind us that we are not.

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,698 other followers