British Airways – Plane Detecting Billboards

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British Airways has unveiled digital billboards which will ‘interact’ with aircrafts flying overhead, as the brand looks to remind customers how magical flying can be, from the perspective of children. Developed by Ogilvy 12th Floor, the ads use custom built surveillance technology which tracks the aircraft and interrupts the digital display just as it passes over the site, revealing the image of a child pointing at the plane overhead accompanied by its flight number and destination it’s arriving from. This will be accompanied by a relevant message to the flight, such as ‘Fly the new A380 to Los Angeles. ba.com/lookup’, or details such as the lowest fare available or the temperature at the destination.

Abigail Comber, British Airways’ head of marketing, said: “This is a first, not just for British Airways but for UK advertising. We all know from conversations with friends and family that we wonder where the planes are going and dream of an amazing holiday or warm destination. The clever technology allows this advert to engage people there and then and answer that question for them. We hope it will create a real ‘wow’ and people will be reminded how amazing flying is and how accessible the world can be.”

The destinations can also be updated immediately depending on changing focus routes for the airline. The ads are part of the airlines’ “Magic of Flying” campaign, which aims to remind people of how magical flying can be, especially from the eyes of a child. The “interactive” billboards are located in London’s Piccadilly Circus and Chiswick.


TBWA/Berlin for adidas – A Giant Case History

IMPOSSIBLE GOALKEEPER

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Just before the start of the UEFA Euro 2008 football tournament, adidas turned one of Vienna’s best-known landmarks, the Prater ferris wheel, into a huge image of the Czech national goalkeeper, Petr Cech. At a whooping 53m tall, this gigantic installation was visible far beyond the Prater entertainment park and the nearby public viewing sites. In the installation, Cech had eight arms that constantly rotated with the ferries wheel. The erection of the metal construction started on May 13 and was finished just before the launch of the tournament on the night of June 5, 2008. This advertising landmark also hosted the official adidas press conference prior to the tournament.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt
Creative: Marco Bezerra, Emiliano Treierveiler

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OLIVER KAHN BRIDGE

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If you travelled to Munich for the first game of the FIFA World Cup in 2006, chances are you saw this huge installation, which shows an enormous Oliver Kahn (the then German national team goalkeeper) diving across the motorway. The 65-m installation managed to bypass the law forbidding advertising on the German Autobahn, and was the only piece of advertising adidas conducted in Germany during the tournament. Over 4 millions people commuted through the installation and many more saw it in the press. In its first week the Oliver Kahn bridge was displayed on double-page spreads in leading magazines including Focus, Stern, Autobild and Fortune. It was also picked up by newspapers including the New York Times and the Financial Times.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Kurt-Georg Dieckert
Creative: Helge Bloch, Boris Schwiedrzik

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IMPOSSIBLE HUDDLE

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For the duration of the UEFA EURO 2008 football tournament, TBWA/Berlin transformed the main hall of Zurich’s Central Station into a large-scale celebration of team spirit. Eleven European football players (all sponsored by adidas, naturally) formed the Impossible huddle. The bodies of the footballers represented were 3D-scanned as were their faces and hairstyles, to ensure that the sculptures were faithful to the originals. It took 40 trucks to move the installation components from the production sites in southern Germany to Switzerland, where they were assembled in the station.

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The Swiss rail authority reported that an estimate 13 million people passed through the station during the three-week period the sculptural installation was in site, and at 17m high and approximately 30m wide, it was impossible to miss. Add to this the fact that various news titles such as the Financial Times, Die Welt, Gazzetta dello Sport, Le Parisien and the BBC featured the campaign on their front pages or online editions, plus the fact that it was picked up by dozens of blog worldwide.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Markus Ewertz
Creative: Erik Gonan, Hendrik Scweder

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FOOTBALL FRESCO

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During the German-hosted 2006 FIFA World Cup, adidas wanted to get across the message that they cooperate with the best football players on the planet. Rather than run a traditional poster campaign, the creatives at TBWA/Berlin decided it would be far more impressive to create a huge Renaissance-style fresco on the ceiling of the main lobby of Cologne Central Station. Within minutes of the fresco’s unveiling, it was featured on national German Television and press covered it throughout the World Cup. More than 8.5 million people saw the frersco in the flesh during the course of the tournament.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Kurt-Georg Dieckert
Creative: Helge Bloch, Boris Schwiedrzik


From TV IS GOOD to WE LOVE TV – The controversial story of ABC campaign

Traditionally, every summer the broadcast television networks launched marketing campaigns to spotlight their program offerings for the coming season. The campaigns were often uneventful and run-of-the-mill, with viewers and the media paying little notice. In 1997, however, ABC, unveiled a different kind of campaign created by TBWA\Chiat\Day in Los Angeles. The campaign, called ‘‘TV Is Good,’’ was designed to help ABC break out of the traditional confines of network slogans and logos, and it created a stir.

Targeting viewers aged 18 to 49 and leveraging a budget of $12 million in its first season, ‘‘TV Is Good’’ directly addressed the guilt associated with watching television. Commercials featured messages that verged on the cynical, such as ‘‘Don’t worry, you’ve got billions of brain cells,’’ and ‘‘Life Is Short. Watch TV.’’ While many in the media criticized the campaign’s apparently insincere celebration of decadent TV-watching, the resulting debate about the merits of ‘‘TV Is Good’’ built considerable buzz around the ABC brand. A 1998–99 modification of the campaign, budgeted at $15 million and tagged ‘‘We Love TV,’’ further contributed to ABC’s emerging personality.

This tactic did not please everyone. For example, Joseph Turow, professor of media at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication, said of the ‘‘TV Is Good’’ campaign, ‘‘I don’t think they care if it turns off people who are over the hill. Advertisers and networks are really getting manic about attracting people under 30.’’ Alan Cohen, ABC’s executive vice president for marketing, said that the network was not intentionally spurning people over 49. Cohen told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that, when ABC tested its campaign promos on viewers aged 18–54, ‘‘The campaign played universally the same . . . The audience is right with us on this.’’

The Strategy
ABC’s third-place position in the ratings convinced its executives that the time was right to try something completely different. As Cohen told Broadcasting & Cable, ‘‘When you’re not number one, you have to take more chances.’’ ABC’s research had revealed that most television viewers could not distinguish between the existing network advertising slogans and that most people tended to ignore logos or stars repeating catchphrases. Cohen said, ‘‘They were all drowning out each other, and it left networks without a brand identity.’’

The goal of the ABC campaign was clear. Cohen explained to the Salt Lake Tribune, ‘‘We want to establish an attitude and personality for ABC that’s funny, friendly, and irreverent.’’ Through test and focus groups the network had further discovered that people enjoyed television more than they were willing to admit, and as Lee Clow, TBWA\Chiat\Day’s chairman, explained, the agency based its creative approach on this knowledge. ‘‘As you talk to people about their lives these days and how stressed they are, TV is this period of time where they actually get to recuperate a little bit,’’ Clow said. ‘‘Kind of just plop yourself down and let something happen to you so you don’t have to use your brain and work too hard for a few minutes. So we thought, why not kind of honestly celebrate the notion that TV is a good part of our lives, and sitting down in front of it for a while isn’t a bad thing.’’

Launching a marketing campaign that celebrated television was not without risks in 1997. At the time there was outspoken criticism of television, with many people objecting to the sexual situations, strong language, and violence found in the programming. By choosing to praise television at a time when it was popular to criticize the medium, ABC knew that it was taking a chance. The first phase of the campaign, which did not mention specific network programs, appeared on television.

The Campaign
These spots established the visual elements that would define the campaign throughout its run: a yellow background on which appeared the black text of witty slogans offering a variety of takes on the ‘‘TV Is Good’’ theme. The initial wave of spots featured messages such as ‘‘Don’t worry, you’ve got billions of brain cells,’’‘You can talk to your wife anytime,’’ ‘‘The couch is your friend,’’ and ‘‘Life is short. Watch TV.’’ Print and billboard ads appeared next, and, finally, the network began running spots for individual shows that incorporated the campaign style.  The budget for ‘‘TV Is Good’’ was approximately $12 million in 1997–98.

The TV spots got the attention of the press even before they were first broadcast. The message was quickly picked up by newspaper writers, and ABC was thrust into the media spotlight. Under the headline ‘‘Ads that Rot Your Brain,’’ Jonathan Foreman of the Wall Street Journal wrote, ‘‘The new TV season gets under way this week, amidst one of the worst ad campaigns of all time. In an apparent effort to win over the young viewers of ‘Generation X,’ ABC settled on irony as an advertising gimmick.’’ Monica Collins of the Boston Herald said, ‘‘At ABC, they’re underestimating us like mad while the network runs the snootiest ad campaign ever.’’ Some ABC affiliates had misgivings about the advertisements, too. Complaints from several affiliates convinced the network to drop one spot that said, ‘‘Books are overrated.’’ In addition, organizations critical of television, including the nonprofit TV-Free America, blasted the commercials. As the spots began to air and the media debate about the campaign’s merits gathered steam, Cohen told Bill Carter of the New York Times, ‘‘The reality is the spots have already worked. People are talking about ABC.’’ Jamie Tarses, then the entertainment president for ABC, told Broadcasting & Cable, ‘‘Anybody would give their left arm for this kind of attention. This is what you want if you’re selling television shows or cars or whatever . . . It’s about making noise.’’

From TV IS GOOD to WE LOVE TV
For the 1998–99 TV season, TBWA\Chiat\Day offered what it called an ‘‘evolved’’ version of the campaign, which, according to the New York Times, ‘‘is adspeak for ‘You don’t like it? All right, already! We’ll change it.’’’ The ironic humor was toned down, and ‘‘TV Is Good’’ was changed to the slightly more sincere ‘‘We Love TV.’’

The messages continued to be delivered in the same visual style (black text on a bright yellow background), and many seemed in keeping with the brashness of the previous seasons. For instance, one spot advised viewers, ‘Don’t just sit there. Okay, just sit there’’ another offered the dubious historical interpretation ‘‘Before TV, two world wars. After TV, zero.’’ But the campaign also began to offer less polarizing messages, such as‘TV, so good they named a frozen meal after it,’’ and ‘Without a TV, how would you know where to put the sofa?’’ .

The 1998–99 season likewise marked an increase in series-specific commercials using the overall campaign’s visual elements, humorous tone, and tagline. The campaign budget for that season was estimated at $15 million.

ABC saw its ‘‘TV Is Good’’ campaign as successful for a number of reasons. First, the campaign received an impressive amount of press coverage. Second, another of the big three networks added to the publicity windfall by mocking the campaign with a television spot of its own. Third, public response to the campaign was mostly favorable. Cohen said to Tom Feran of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, ‘‘We did talk to a lot of viewers around the country and show them this material, and I think people sort of got it. They said, ‘Wow, this is funny. ABC is funny. They must have good comedies.’ And that’s exactly the connection we wanted them to make.’’

In the 1999–2000 season ABC and TBWA\Chiat\Day further redefined the brand-building project. Although the network’s promotional spots continued to employ the visual elements and a measure of the ironic humor from the previous two seasons’ campaigns, the new tagline, ‘‘America’s Broadcasting Company,’’ seemed to mark a departure in tone and strategy. The network and its agency maintained that the campaign was not a reversal of the previous years’ tactics but rather a further evolution. This view was supported by a recurring message in the ‘‘America’s Broadcasting Company’’ spots: ‘‘United we watch.’’


Have you ever noticed that the first TV and Press Grand Prix were italian?

1954. European cinema contractors launch the Festival to celebrate great cinema advertising. The first Cannes Grand Prix goes to a spot called “Il Circo” from Italy’s Ferry Mayer for Chlorodont toothpaste.

1992. The Press and Poster category introduced. McCann-Erickson Milan is awarded first Grand Prix in the category for its Levi’s campaign.

Advertising Agency:  McCann-Erickson Italia
Creative Director: Milka Pogliani
Copywriter: Alessandro Canale
Art Director: Stefano Colombo
Photographer: Graham Ford

Good Luck Italy.


C&A/Clothing Retail Stores – Father’s Day

The Brief
For Father’s Day, C&A presented an original idea to its clients – on the purchase of an adult-size garment, an identical child-size item was offered free.

The Creative Execution
We therefore created small bus-shelter posters along with the large ones. In the large format there was a father and, in the small one, his similarly-dressed son. This action took place close to C&A shops.

Results
From the first day, C&A was out of stock on certain articles. The national press was in uproar about this action. For the first time in 10 years, C&A was ahead of H&M in terms of overall reputation.

Advertising Agency: DDB BELGIUM, Brussels
Creative Director: Jean-Charles della Faille
Art Director: Julien Thiry
Copywriter: Bertrand Gascard
Year: 2006
Gold Lion (Best Use of Outdoor)


Looks! There’s a MINI on the wall!

MINI UK – Climbing MINI


Advertising Agency: WCRS, UK
Creative Director: Leon Jaume
Copywriter: Andy Brittain
Art Director: Yu Kung
Year: 2002

MINI Canada – Corner


Advertising Agency: Taxi, Toronto
Creative Director: Zack Mroue
Copywriter: Zack Mroue
Art Director: Lance Martin
Year: 2003

MINI Canada – Union Jack


Advertising Agency: Taxi, Toronto
Creative Director: Zack Mroue
Copywriter: Zack Mroue
Art Director: Lance Martin
Year: 2003

MINI Canada – Luge


Advertising Agency: Taxi, Toronto
Creative Director: Zack Mroue
Copywriter: Michael Meyers
Art Director: Lance Martin
Year: 2004
Shortlist

MINI Canada – Agrippez-vous


Advertising Agency: Taxi, Toronto
Creative Director: Zack Mroue
Copywriter: Jane Murray, Gaetan Naumoric
Art Director: Rose Sauquillo
Year: 2004

MINI USA – 3D Robot


Advertising Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky, Miami
Creative Director: Alex Bogusky
Copywriter: Rogar Hoard, Mike Lear, Bob Cianfrone

Art Director: Dave Swartz, Paoul Keister
Year: 2005

MINI Cabrio – YO-YO

Advertising Agency: D’Adda, Lorenzini, Vigorelli, BBDO
Creative Director: Giuseppe Mastromatteo, Luca Scotto Di Carlo
Copywriter: Cristino Battista
Art Director: Dario Agnello
Photographer: Armando Rebatto
Year: 2006
Shortlist

MINI Canada – Let There Be Xenon


Advertising Agency: Taxi, Toronto
Creative Director: Lance Martin
Copywriter: Jordan Doucette/Ryan Wagman
Art Director: Troy McGuinness
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion

MINI JAPAN – Missing

The Brief
To build and to maximize a new value of Mini in a Japanese way, and to arouse interest and attract attention toward Mini from not only Mini fans but also from those who had no interest. Taking an opportunity of the updated New Mini launch on the “Mini Day (promotional anniversary in Japan)”.

The creative execution
To describe the New Mini’s exciting charm by putting it into the Japanese favourite “Manga” story-“the New Mini escaped with its own will.”
To expand the New Mini’s fascination and to generate penetration in the market by involving the Japanese audience into Mini’s escape story in the theatrical campaign. The campaign was aimed at 35-49 year olds the liberals of high society. It is the progressive trendsetter that becomes the core target as they invent the fashion. The campaign is developed mainly on Outdoor advertisement and website, without using other mass media. However it was taken up by TV, magazine and outdoor advertising. The story development of the campaign succeeded in having not only a simple recognition of the product but also a deeper personal communication.

Advertising Agency: ADK, Tokyo
Creative Director: Tatsuyuki Hamada
Copywriter: Keisuke Yosahida
Art Director: Toshiaki Oikawa
Year: 2007
Shortlist

MINI COOPER S – Base Jump


In 2006, the MINI was re-launched. Its key feature: more power. And while the new engine creates the familiar “go-cart feeling”, a simple switch of the (tiptronic) button to the “Sport” mode causes the power steering and the gas pedal to respond even more directly. The re-launch’s campaign slogan was “Incredibly MINI. The new MINI.“ And when MINI says “incredible”, they mean incredible. As incredible as a jump from one rooftop to another.
On the one side the ramp, on the other the brand-new MINI Cooper S: for every driver crossing the bridge near this twin high-rise, it had to look as if the car had just achieved such as spectacular feat. Which lent an air of nitty-gritty realism to the message “Incredibly MINI. The new MINI.” And gave a powerful boost to the whole campaign.
The target audience for this campaign was “postmodern trendsetters”, i.e. fun-loving people with a penchant for thrills and spills. Among their values and life goals are independence, spontaneity, rejection of norms, self-realisation, fun and action. The MINI installation was perfectly attuned to this group and their search for the uncommon and sensational.
The “MINI Base Jump“ campaign caused quite a stir, both among the media and the people driving by the spectacular sight every day. The promotion’s aim was to invite people to go for a test drive at their nearest MINI dealership – because statistics show that 60% of those who try one, buy one.

Advertising Agency: Jung von Matt AG, Zurich
Executive Creative Director: Alexander Jaggy
Creative Director: Michael Rottmann
Art Director: David Hanselmann
Copywriter: Thomas Amman
Year: 2007

MINI Malaysia – Loop


Advertising Agency: BBDO/Proximity, Malaysia
Executive Creative Director: Ronald Ng
Creative Director: Mun
Copywriter: Kevin Le, Ronald Ng, Johanne Chow
Art Director: Mun, Richie Chan
Year: 2008

MINI Canada – MINI Vending Machine




2011 brought on a new year of model updates for the always-iconic MINI and MINI Canada wanted to show these off by highlighting what our MINI target loves most about the car: its individuality. .
The goal was to create a buzz-worthy piece that would let our target audience know that MINI absolutely owns customization.
They decided to showcase the idea of personalizing your MINI, by tactically placing an interactive experience right where our target audience would be found, in an arresting way that only MINI could do.
They created the MINI Vending Machine, the largest ever interactive night projection in Canada, which showcased different combinations of the latest 2011 MINIs. Placed strategically in the club district where our key target audience is found, passersby could interact with it by texting to choose the MINI they wanted. This triggered their MINI to drive to the bottom in 1 of 9 fun, cheeky animations. A personalized-response SMS message was then dispatched to them, that led to MINI’s Facebook page.
Several channels worked together to maximize the campaign: first, our target could both view the eye-catching projection and then interact with it. This was then taken one step further in our ability to gather a data-base of  target audience.
Finally, the projection went viral, and gained immense international exposure.
The Vending Machine was hugely successful; not only did it get 134,861 impressions in two weeks, it received large-scale attention on thousands of sites and blogs all over the world, as well as over 20,000 hits on Youtube in its first week.
The MINI Vending Machine didn’t just light up the street for the public to interact with and enjoy – it created a major buzz online.

Advertising Agency: Taxi 2, Canada
Creative Director: Lance Martin
Copywriter: Alanna Nathanson
Art Director: Jeff MacEachern
Animation: Hatch Studios
Interactive: Forth Wall
Year: 2011
Shortlist

MINI Countryman – The Getaway Billboard


Insights, Strategy & the Idea
MINI launches the MINI Countryman: The 4th car line of the company, after “Hatch”, “Clubman”, “Cabrio”. The biggest one (4 meters). The first with 4 doors and, most of all, the first with 4WD.
The positioning claim is MINI Countryman. Getaway, “Getaway” means the opportunity to have multiple choices and join your passions.
– Objective. The new MINI Countryman is coming to town and we need to present it to the target.
– Media choice:. we have a big-size outdoor media, in the city centre of Milan.
– The challenge. To find a disruptive way of using the billboards, finding an eye catching creative idea.
The purpose is: to be spectacular, using a fibreglass car on the billboard; to be consistent with the positioning: showing the “Getaway” via active sport field (considering the incoming summer season the new MINI is the perfect car able to follow your passion like sea surfing).
Creative Execution
We have the opportunity to use a special three-face billboard.
The idea is to create continuity between the three billboards using a creative execution able to connect them.
Billboard 1. It represent a fake surf apparel brand adv: young surfers pose in front of the camera but three of them seem to be interested on what’s happening around the corner, and one of them, physically, is watching on the main billboard.
Billboard 2. The new MINI Countryman in fibreglass is the protagonist. It has a surf board on the roof and is represented as it is “going away”, out of the billboard. One of the surfers, represented on billboard one, is watching the MINI going away with his surf board.
Billboard 3. An invitation, together with an announcing of the new MINI, consistent with execution: “Welcome on Board”.
Results and Effectiveness
An impactful presence, spectacular and attention getting also during the “installation”, it has created a sort of “event”.
An estimate of 964.000 contacts made in 30 days of exposition.
Great unaided PR activity: the most influent Italian newspapers mentioned the campaign.
Target catch, also through word-of-mouth offline and online (web sites from all over the world posted the images; surfing the net with “MINI Countryman Billboard” the Italian idea is the first between the search results).

Advertising Agency: Bcube, Italy
Executive Creative Director: Francesco Bozza
Creative Director: Alessandro Sabini
Copywriter: Martino Lapini
Art Director: Fabio D’Altilia, Daniele Pancetti
Year: 2011

MINI Countryman – Times Square




Amidst the clutter, neon and noise of Times Square we used the launch of the all-new four-wheel drive MINI Countryman to do something simple, quiet and, dare we say, beautiful. The eight panel OOH takeover has two fiberglass Countryman mounted on an idyllic mountain scene with the words: Let it Snow.

Advertising Agency: Butler, Shine, Stern & Partners
Year: 2011


TBWA/PHS, Helsinki for Young Director Award (2000/2011) – Born to create a great case history

2000

Natural Born Directors (Poster)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Mira Leppanen
Art Directors: Zoubida Benkhellat
Copywriter: Mira Leppanen
Shortlist

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2001

Highchair (Poster)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Mira Leppanen
Art Directors: Zoubida Benkhellat
Copywriter: Mira Leppanen

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2002

Hands (Poster)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Mira Leppanen
Art Directors: Zoubida Benkhellat
Copywriter: Mira Leppanen

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2003

Cut (Poster)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Mira Leppanen/Zoubida Benkhellat
Art Directors: Zoubida Benkhellat
Copywriter: Mira Leppanen

My Idea (Print)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Mira Leppanen/Zoubida Benkhellat
Art Directors: Zoubida Benkhellat
Copywriter: Mira Leppanen

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2004

Drool (Poster)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Mira Leppanen/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavolat
Copywriter: Mira Leppanen
Year: 2004

Lion Hunter (Commercial)

There’s a nature program on tv with VO. A baby is relaxing in front of the tv. The VO continues and after hearing the word “lion”, the baby begins to stare at the TV with excited eyes. Natural Born Director CFP–E and SHOTS Young Director Award

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Mira Leppanen/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavolat
Copywriter: Mira Leppanen
Director: Miko Iho

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2005

Alfred/Quentin/Woody (Print Campaign)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director:  Zoubida Benkhellat/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavolat
Copywriter: Mira Leppanen

Swimmer (Commercial)

A pastiche of Tarsem´s Swimmer. The younger you start the better you get.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director:  Zoubida Benkhellat/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavolat
Copywriter: Markku Ronkko
Director: Thomas Ericson
Production Company: Berghs School of Communication, Sweden

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2006

Eisenstein/Chaplin/Coppola (Print Campaign)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director:  Zoubida Benkhellat/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavolat
Copywriter: Markku Ronkko
Shortlist

Jaws (Commercial)

Eisenstein (Commercial)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director:  Zoubida Benkhellat/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavolat
Copywriter: Markku Ronkko

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2007

Balls/Mountain (Poster)

Balls (Commercial)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director:  Zoubida Benkhellat/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavola
Copywriter: Markku Ronkko

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2008

Bunny/Gorilla (Poster)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director:  Zoubida Benkhellat/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavola
Copywriter: Markku Ronkko

Gorilla -Full of Talent (Commercial)

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2009

Accident/Affair (Print Campaign)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director:  Zoubida Benkhellat/Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavola
Copywriter: Minna Lavola

Dirty Loundry (Commercial)

A ten-year-old boy sits down in front of a dressing table in a bedroom. He takes one of the lipsticks from the table, and puts it on. He then walks towards the wardrobe in his parent’s bedroom and takes out one of his father’s white shirts. He kisses the shirt collar staining it with red kissing marks. He then carries it to the washing room and drops it next to the laundry machine. As he wipes his mouth clean we cut to text: Born to create drama. Young Director Award by CFP-E/Shots

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavola
Copywriter: Minna Lavola
Director: Lourens Blok
Production Company: Caviar, Amsterdam

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2010

Pool (Poster)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavola
Copywriter: Mira Ollson

Drama Queen (Commercial/Promo/Digital)


A thirty-something woman is driving a car while her 5-year-old daughter is peacefully sitting in the back seat.
The woman is being pulled over by a policeman for speeding.
The policeman notices the girl in the back seat, and comments with a friendly voice:
“Mummy a bit in a hurry, was she?”
The girl looks at the policeman with serious eyes and answers in a monotone voice:
“She’s not my mommy.”
She then lifts up a drawing pad where she has scribbled the word: HELP, and adds articulating: “Help me.”
“Step out of the car Madam!” The policeman orders strictly.
The girl looks mischievously towards the camera and a text appears: Born to create drama. Young Director Award by CFP-E/Shots


Describe the objective of the promotion.
To establish Young Director Award by CFP-E/SHOTS as THE competition for aspiring commercial film directors and to get as many entries as possible to the 2010 competition. (To be eligible, entries must be one of the first four commercials a director has directed.)
Describe how the promotion developed from concept to implementation
The concept, born to create drama, puts emphasis on the unique talent of young directors.
We felt the best way to promote a young director award show was to lead by example and give an inexperienced director an opportunity to shoot a script with strong viral-potential, and seed it out to aspiring commercial directors.
The film was broadcast on youth oriented programs, seeded to production companies and film schools and posted on facebook-sites and on youtube. To add interest among our target group, we also posted a making-of of the commercial on the youngdirectoraward.com-blog.
Describe the success of the promotion with both client and consumer including some quantifiable results
The link was sent to 1500 email-addresses including production companies and film schools. This led to over 265 000 hits on youtube in a few weeks (and counting). The film was discovered by traditional broadcast as best commercial of the month and got six free air times on prime time television, it was also picked up by over 30 online sites publishing the newest and the freshest of the industry and beyond.
The Youngdirectoraward.com site immediately received 76% new visitors with an average of 48 minutes on site.
Within a month, YDA received around 400 entries from young commercial directors around the world.
Explain why the method of promotion was most relevant to the product or service
The entry deadline was getting closer and it was the quickest way to make a strong impact and get a response from our target group. Young commercial directors live and breath quality commercials. That is their passion.
It was crucial to be a fast success on youtube, which is the place where young directors seek references and inspiration on a daily basis. Writing a script with strong viral potential and shooting it with an inexperienced young director (24-year old Rogier Hesp) inspires other young and up-coming directors to fulfill their own dreams.
Supporting and inspiring talent is the sole purpose of Young Director Award by CFP-E/Shots.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS Helsinki
Copywriter: Mira Olsson
Art Director: Minna Lavola
Production Company: L-A-D-A, Amsterdam
Director: Rogier Hesp

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2011

Time for dinner (Poster)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavola
Copywriter: Mira Ollson
Year: 2011

Pool Guy/Grandpa/Closet (Print Campaign)

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavola
Copywriter: Mira Ollson
Year: 2011

Double Life (Commercial)

A 5-year-old girl is sitting in a swing, while her dad is pushing her. Her dad’s mobile rings and he steps away to take the call. The girl spots a couple that are having their wedding picture taken close by: they look besotted by each other and gladly take different poses while the wedding photographer directs them. Suddenly the little girl runs joyfully to the newlywed man and shouts:
“Daddy, daddy!“  Hugging the confused mans leg, she looks up to him and innocently continues: “Where’s mommy?”
The bride is in shock. We zoom closer to the little girl, as she looks into the camera with a mischievous smile.
Cut to text: Born to create drama.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/PHS, Helsinki
Creative Director: Minna Lavola
Art Directors: Minna Lavola
Copywriter: Mira Ollson

Directort: Ben Brand
Producton Company: Caviar, Amsterdam


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