Happy New Year Ads

Happy New Year from BRUSSELS AIRLINES

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Happy New Year from DISCO SUPERMARKETS

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Happy New Year from DURACELL

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Happy New Year from DUREX

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Happy New Year from TMB (Metro de Barcelona)

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Happy New Year from ALKA SELTZER

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Happy New Year from AUDI

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Happy New Year from AXE

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Happy New Year from BARILLA

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Happy New Year from YES Tablet

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Happy New Year from MIKADO

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Happy New Year from HONDA

 

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Happy New Year from BMW

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Happy New Year from O.B.

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118-118 The Number (2003/2009) – A Real Spoof Case History

118 118’s advertising features two men with droopy mustaches, wearing items of clothing with 118 and two parallel red stripes on it. They have appeared in various forms. The campaign was originally launched using the two men dressed as athletic runners. Used with the catchphrase “Got Your Number!”, the runners’ characters featured in a high-profile advertising (created by British advertising agency WCRS).

This slogan has fallen into disuse by the marketing department of 118 118 because of the expansion of service beyond directory enquiries alone, but the slogan has lived on in the minds of the public. The use of the runners’ characters is particularly noted for the legal action threatened by 1970s record-breaking runner David Bedford. 118 118 responded to this by stating that their inspiration was partly the late American runner Steve Prefontaine.


David Bedford


Steve Prefontaine

Subsequently they have appeared in a range of guises, including spoof detectives, as the company expanded on its range of services. During this period, although generally forgotten by the public, the slogan used was “We’re here to help!”, a different focus driven by the expansion of products offered.

2003 – Rocky Campaign
In November 2003 the commercial, called “Rocky”, features the moustachioed runners jogging through London. As the pair run, the ad turns into a training scene reminiscent of the film. More than 30 moustachioed children, dressed as 118 118 runners, join the training run which culminates with the duo recreating the end of Stallone’s run with hands thrust victoriously in the air at the top of a long flight of steps. “That’s what happens when you help millions of people each week!” one of the runners comment… In keeping with the retro theme, the commercial also features a cameo appearance by the 80s ventriloquist, Keith Harris, and his bird puppet Orville.

Keith Martin, the account manager at WCRS, said: “The campaign has two points of focus. The first is memorability. With the old 192 service being switched off on 24 August, there will be a lot of activity and so it is all about getting 118 118 as the most memorable number for customers to use. The second aim is stature. By running these campaigns, we want to show that 118 118 is here to stay – that the company is taking millions of calls a month already. More weighting is being put on running the 60-second spot, as it adds scale.”

2004 – Honda Spoof Campaign
In this addition to the series featuring the skinny athletes, they created the award-winning Honda commercial “Cog” and “Choir” created by Wieden & Kennedy London, using old bit of carpet, gym mats, a stop sign and a couple of old treadmills. It’s not as high tech as the original, but it gets the message across – and probably provided a nice giggle for the advertising community. It was created for television, but Honda failed to see the humorous side and stopped the ad from being broadcast. It is now, however, available for view online and is being promoted through a viral campaign.

2006. A-Team Campaign
In February 2006 a new advertising campaign was launched in which the runners appeared in advertisements in the style of the television show The A-Team, using the A-Team theme tune with the number 118 sung over the music.

2007. Flashdance Campaign
In May 2007 a new advertising campaign was launched in which the runners trade in their 70s look for leotards and leg warmers to spoof the 1983 film starring Jennifer Beals. The two and a half minute clip features a comedy reworking of Michael Sembello’s song Maniac, which featured on the Flashdance soundtrack.

2009, the Ghostbuster Campaign
Shot like a camp pop video, the 2-minute film also stars Ray Parker Jr, who appears in a number of guises, including a postman, a bus conductor and a mechanic. 60 and 40-second versions will also be broadcast. The legendary singer stars alongside the moustachioed 118 118 brothers who are back in tight shorts running round a London street helping people out. The ad ends with the trio standing on top of a mini van singing to a crowd of dancing onlookers.


Songvertising – 32 best commercials with singing people

1 – YEO VALLEY ORGANIC – Boyband

In a follow-up to last year’s rapping farmers ad, Yeo Valley launched a tv spot during the first ad break of The X Factor live show. The one-off, two-minute music video features a farming-inspired boy band called The Churned, singing a ballad entitled Forever. The ad was shot on location in Blagdon, in the heart of rural Somerset. The launch tied in with a Facebook karaoke competition, where users could sing along to the Yeo Valley track. The winner appeared in a 30-second version of the ad, which ran during the X Factor final on 11 December.

Advertising Agency: BBH London
Year: 2012
Shortlist

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2 – CARLTON DRAUGHT – Big Ad

An epic send-up of big budget ads, featuring a cast of thousands. Song lyrics: “It’s a big ad / very big ad/ it’s a big ad we’re in./ It’s a big ad/ my God it’s big/ can’t believe how big it is/ it’s a big ad for Carlton Draught / It’s just so freaking huge! / It’s a big ad/ expensive ad! / This ad better sell some bloooooody beer!!!

Advertising Agency: George Patterson Y&R, Melbourne
Year: 2006
Gold Lion

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3 – PUMA – Hardchorus

We open on a small group of hardcore soccer fans, also known as hooligans, standing in a classic British pub. Suddenly, one of them starts singing the first words of “Truly, Madly, Deeply” by Savage Garden. Another hooligan joins in, and as the camera pulls out, we see that the whole pub is packed with hooligans. They all sing together with the power of an entire stadium of fans during a soccer game, turning the cheesy love song into something big, beautiful and romantic. After the last chorus, a super appears: “It’s match day. It’s Valentine’s Day. Let your better half know how you feel. Dedicate and send this song at pumahardchorus.com”. Followed by Puma’s “Love = football” next to the Puma logo.

Advertising Agency: Droga5
Year: 2010
Gold Lion for the Campaign

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4 – NORTE BEER – It’s Good to Have Friends

Beer means friendship, and this campaings presents in funny way the different kind of friends we all have.

Advertising Agency: Del Campo/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi, Buenos Aires
Year: 2009
Silver Lion for the Campaign

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5 – T-MOBILE – Welcome Back

On October 27th 2010, thousands of unsuspecting passengers arriving at Heathrow’s Terminal 5 were given a welcome home to remember. People were greeted by a 300 strong choir and vocal orchestra singing a medley of songs, completely a cappella, to welcome them back into the country.

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Satchi,  London
Year: 2011
Silver Lion

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6 – COCA-COLA – Hilltop

Advertising Agency: McCann Erikson
Year: 1971

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7 – HEINEKEN – Singer

A blues singer can’t sing the blues – his life is too contented. A sip of lager soon changes that. Heineken refreshes his blueness.

Advertising Agency: Lowe Haward- Spink,  UK
Year: 1992
Gold Lion

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8 – HONDA – Impossible Dream

A man travels on an incredible journey using some of Honda’s landmark products whilst miming to the Andy Williams song ‘The Impossible Dream’. His journey comes to an abrupt end when he leaps off a giant waterfall in a Honda Powerboat into the mist below. Surely, this is the end of his dream? However as Andy Williams reaches the crescendo of the song, our hero returns in a Honda Hot Air Balloon to finish off the song in style. Garrison Keillor – the voice of Honda – sums it all up with ‘I couldn’t have put it better myself’.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy,  London
Year: 2006
Gold Lion

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9 – COCA-COLA – Choir

Here’s Coca-Cola celebrating along with Santo its 125th year, and once again, we are guilty of naivety. We believe that, even today, the world is not far from the world that we dream of. In fact we are so naïve about thinking this way, that we decided to carry out an investigation to evaluate just how justified our reasons to believe in a better world were. We are proud to present to you “Choir”, created by Santo for Coca-Cola Latin America and their new communications platform: “REASONS TO BELIEVE IN A BETTER WORLD”.

Advertising Agency: Santo, Buenos Aires
Year: 2011
Silver Lion

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10 – T-MOBILE – Singalong

When T-Mobile invited the British public to be part of their next event, people turned up to Trafalgar Square, not knowing what they were letting themselves in for. Thousands of microphones were handed out as it was revealed they’d all be singing karaoke together. After a number of songs, and with a surprise guest appearance from Pink, the event culminated with everyone singing the timeless classic, ‘Hey Jude’

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Satchi,  London
Year: 2010
Shortlist

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 11 – NIKE FREE RUN – I Would Run to You

Love makes people do crazy things. Like run across the country. See how strong running reunites a long distance couple.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Year: 2012
Bronze Lion

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 12 – NIKE – Pretty

As Maria Sharapova marches to her tennis match, she passes people who sing I Feel Pretty. She slams a ball cross to court, putting an end to the singing.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Year: 2007
Gold Lion

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13 – BASF – Dear John

The ad, set in army camp, features a soldier receiving a letter which goes to the tune of “Dear John”, the country song written by Lewis Talley, Fuzzy Owen and Billy Barton and made popular by Jean Shepard during the Korean war. As the song finishes the sergeant adapts the classic line from Humphrey Bogart, “Play it again John”.

Advertising Agency: Colenso BBDO, NZ
Year: 1982
Gold Lion

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14 – REXONA – Sensitive Armpits

A tough lumberjack is chopping down a tree. As he rearranges his cap, we notice at the same time he does that his underarm begins to song a sweet song. The corny melody is really annoying him. At this point, we see different cliché images of rough and tough men all undergoing the same situation. Finally, one of them applies the New Rexona Men Sensitive and succeeds in shutting up the underarm voice. A male voice in off says: New Rexona Men Sensitive. Even the most insensitive guy can have sensitive underarms.

Advertising Agency: Ponce Buenos Aires
Year: 2011
Silver Lion

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 15 – STARBUCKS – Glen

Glen jumpstarts his day by drinking a Starbucks DoubleShot. As he opens the can, Survivor appears in his apartment. They follow Glen through his full morning routine, singing a personalized version of “Eye of the Tiger.”

Advertising Agency: Fallon, New York
Year: 2004
Shortlist

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16 – GOOGLE – Demo Slam: Realtime Karaoke

Google is more than just a search bar. However, most of us don’t use, let alone, are aware of its many features. We needed to find a way to share all this free technology with the world. To educate everyone about all of Google’s innovations; we decided to change the way people learnt about it. We got precisely the people who didn’t use this free tech, to explain to the others why they should. Because, only they would be able to explain it in a way that would be fun to watch, and understood by all. By bringing in just a little bit of courage, creativity and fun; each of them pushed the role of technology in our lives and inspired the rest to use it in ways never imagined before.
Transforming something few were aware of to something the whole world cared about; we were able to re-define the role of technology in everyone’s life. From celebrities, scientists, soccer moms, teens to even sports personalities; everyone came forward to find new ways in which technology could make their world a little better.

Advertising Agency: Johannes Leonardo, NY
Year: 2011
Gold Lion for the Campaign

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17 – DISCOVERY CHANNEL – I Love the World

We developed a new brand idea for Discovery Channel: Discovery is the
World’s Biggest Fan of the World. We wanted to celebrate all that is epic, beautiful, inspiring, fun and just plain crazy in the world. Fellow fans—from spacewalking Astronauts to Alaskan fishermen to Zulu warriors to Stephen Hawking to Discovery hosts like Mike Rowe and Bear Grylls—sing along to an old campfire song re-written to express how each of them loves the world. In other words, to tell people why Discovery Channel thinks “The World is Just Awesome.”

Advertising Agency: 72ndSunny, USA
Year: 2008
Shortlist

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18 – MATCH.COM – Piano

This is a film for the online dating service, Match.com, which features a couple finding each other as they examine musical instruments. He strums a guitar and she plays a keyboard. Together they make beautiful music, and it’s clearly the start of something special.

Advertising Agency: Mother, London
Year: 2010
Gold Lion

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 19 – WILKINSON – Mow the Lawn

Girls in a front yard sing about mowing the lawn in order to promote Wilkinson/Schick Quattro razors for women.

Advertising Agency: JWT, New York
Year: 2009

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20 – AMERICAN LEGACY FOUNDATION/TRUTH – Singing Cowboy

We saddled up a horse, found a modern day cowboy that happened to have a hole in his neck due to a tobacco-related laryngectomy, and sent him to Manhattan to sing.

Advertising Agency: Arnold/Crispin Porter + Bogusky, USA
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion

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21 – ARNET BROABAND – Numa Numa

The ad shows some of the funny stuff you can find on the Internet.

Advertising Agency: Santo, Buenos Aires
Year: 2007
Shortlist

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22 – EVIAN – Voices

A man in a lift, a jogger, a secretary by the photocopier, a man in his car, an elderly lady…in all these scenes from everyday life, we see people singing with their childish voices.

Advertising Agency: BETC Euro RSCG, Paris
Year: 2003
Shortlist

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 23 – NIKE WOMEN – Surgery

A group of women run away from a plastic surgery clinic dancing a choreography to a reggaetón tune.

Advertising Agency: Madre, Buenos Aires
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion

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 24 – DIESEL – Anthem

Sing-a -ong Diesel Island national anthem. Why is your country fucked up?

Advertising Agency: Santo, Buenos Aires
Year: 2011
Silver Lion for the Campaign

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 25 – PROCTER & GAMBLE – You’ll Never Walk Alone

This 60-second commercial shows a lifetime of moms by their children’s sides doing the daily, sometimes mundane, things that help their children grow up to be Olympians. All the while, they sing “You’ll Never Walk Alone” from the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical Carousel. The ad builds from a child’s birth and culminates with the Olympics and a proud mom seeing all her hard work pay off. We then cut to a card that says, “Thank you, Mom,” followed by a series of product brand images that ends on the P&G logo with the voice-over, “P&G. Proud sponsor of Moms.”

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Year: 2010
Bronze Lion for the Campaign

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26 – BURGER KING – Americas Favorite/More Mayo/More Cheese

Introducing the Whopperettes.

The Whopperettes return with a story about extra cheese.

The Whopperettes return with a story about mayo.

Advertising Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky
Year: 2006
Silver Lion for the Campaign

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 27 – CADBURY DAIRY MILK – Night Runner

Fallon and Cadbury keep Great Britain pumped for the Olympics with a new spot that re-creates “The Final Countdown” — but adds multiple voices singing from the towers and buildings while a runner makes his way, presumably, to the Olympic Gold. An accompanying interactive feature encourages Britons to upload videos of them singing similarly inspirational songs to help team GB to victory.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Year: 2012

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28 – LOTTO LOTTERY – Ballroom Blitz

A taxi driver refuses to let passengers into his cab. Instead, he walks over to the queue and starts to sing for them. The man who joins in is chosen as the lucky passenger.

Advertising Agency: New Deal DDB, Norway
Year: 2001
Bronze Lion

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29 – CADBURY DAIRY MILK – Simply the Best

Part of Cadbury’s “Keep Team GB Pumped” campaign for London 2012 Olympics, swimmer Rebecca Adlington is serenaded by royal guards, dinner ladies and butchers with Tina Turner’s “Simply the Best.”

Advertising Agency: Hypernaked, London
Year: 2012

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30 – AMP ENERGY DRINK – Walk of no Shame

AMP wanted to introduce three new products with specific energy functions, designed to help our target, people who live their lives to the fullest. We also needed to increase brand awareness and embed ourselves into their daily life. We wanted to be the most relevant, unlike our hyper-masculine energy competitors. “Walk of No Shame” was an ode to the infamous walk that young people take “the night after” going out. With the look and sound of a mini-musical, AMP showed how one can take a “walk of no shame” as it gets you back on your feet.

Advertising Agency: BBDO New York
Year: 2009
Shortlist

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31 – LABATT BLUE BEER – Big Song

A young man tries to make up to his girlfriend by singing her a song around a campfire – “Out of the Blue”, and it turns into a huge sing-a-long.

Advertising Agency: Ammirati Puris, Canada
Year: 2001

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32 – PEPSI – Pepsi Generation

Advertising Agency: BBDO, USA
Year: 1984


Cannes Alternative Grand Prix (2001/2011)

Grand Prix 2001 – FOX Regional Sports (Turkey/China/Russia/India)

A Turkish sports reporter is at a cliff-diving tournament. A diver jumps off a steep cliff, goes into a ‘swan dive’ and lands on dirt. Turkish peasants clap politely. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

A Chinese sports reporter is showing highlights of a ‘tree catching’ competition. We see two lumberjacks chop down a giant 200-ft tree for an athlete to catch. He is not successful. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

A Russian sports reporter is covering a ‘slapping contest’ in a smokey, seedy bunker. Two large men take turns slapping each other in the face. Suddenly, an impressive slap causes the drunken crowd to erupt. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

The host of a Mumbai sports show is interviewing the National Clubbing Champion. Two blindfolded men chase each other with clubs in front of a large crowd. They swing wildly at each other … but miss. Then one loses his bearings and starts pounding a gentleman in the crowd. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

Advertising Agency: Cliff Freeman and Partners, USA
Creative Director: Eric Silver
Copywriter: Dan Morales
Art Director: Rossana Bardales
Production Company: Partizan NY
Director: Traktor

Alternative Grand Prix – John West (Bear)

At a river, a man fights a bear for a salmon. Voiceover: John West endure the worst to bring you the best. Super: John West Red Salmon.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett UK
Creative Director: Mark Tutssel
Copywriter: Paul Silburn
Art Director: Paul Silburn
Production Company: Spectre UK
Director: Daniel Kleinman

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Grand Prix 2002 – Nike (Tag)

A young man is tagged in an elaborate game, involving the entire city. He races off to tag someone else, and they elude him to the very end.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, USA
Creative Director: Dan Wieden, Hal Curtis, Jim Riswold
Art Director: Monica Taylor, Andy Fackrell
Director: Frank Budgen

Alternative Grand Prix – Levis (Odyssey)

A man and a woman hurtle through a string of solid walls. They crash out of the building, land on a tree, and run up it into the night sky.

Advertising Agency: BBH, UK
Creative Director: Stephen Butler
Art Director: Gavin Lester
Production Company: Academy, UK
Director: Jonathan Glazer

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Grand Prix 2003 – IKEA (Lamp)

An old lamp is thrown out to make way for a new one from Ikea.

Advertising Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky, USA
Creative Director: Alex Bogusky, Paul Keister
Art Director: Mark Taylor, Steve Mapp
Copywriter: Ari Merkin
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Spike Jonze

Alternative Grand Prix – Honda (Cog)

Cog is a two-minute chain reaction using only parts from a Honda Accord. Each car part cleverly triggers off the next, showing the beauty and precision of the pieces, and the ingenuity of the engineers who built it, prompting the V/O to comment “Isn’t it nice when things just work?”.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy, London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth
Art Director: Matt Gooden
Copywriter: Ben Walker
Production Company: Partizan, London
Director: Antoine Bardou-Jacquet

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Grand Prix 2004 – Playstation 2 (Mountain)

Hundreds of thousands of people are forming a human mountain higher than any of the other buildings in the city. At it’s zenith a variety of people enjoy a moment of exhilaration before others scramble over them and take their place.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/London
Creative Director: Trevor Beattie
Art Director: Tony McTear
Copywriter: Paula Marcantonio, Tony McTear
Production Company: Gorgeous Enterprises, UK
Director: Frank Budgen

Alternative Grand Prix – Lynx 24-7 (Getting Dressed)

A man and woman wake up in bed. They start getting dressed. We soon discover that their clothes are scattered right across the city. The last shoe sits by two opposite-facing shopping trolleys in a supermarket. The couple met there only hours ago. The man was wearing Lynx 24/7 bodyspray.

Advertising Agency: BBH, UK
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Art Director: Nick Gill
Copywriter: Nick Gill
Production Company: Small Family Business, UK
Director: Ringan Ledwidge

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Grand Prix 2005 – Honda (Grrr)

Can hate be a good thing? Honda ‘Grrr’ sets out to prove just that. A tranquil world is invaded by flying, dirty old Diesel engines. However, the population get angry and even, using their hate for the better, destroying every last one. Finally, they herald the brand new Honda Diesel.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy, London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth, Chris O’reilly
Art Director: Sean Thompson, Michael Russoff, Richard Russell
Copywriter: Sean Thompson, Michael Russoff, Richard Russell
Production Company: Nexus Production, London
Director: Adam Foulkes, Alan Smith

Alternative Grand Prix – Adidas (Hello Tomorrow)

Adidas 1 is the first shoe with a computer. “Hello Tomorrow” demonstrates that with every step these magical shoes can create an entirely new world out of nothing. It is a story of rebirth and
taking your first steps – again.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/Chiat/Day, San Francisco
Creative Director: Lee Clow, Chuck McBride, Joe Kayser
Art Director: Joe Kayser
Copywriter: Chuck McBride
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Spike Jonze

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Grand Prix 2006 – Guinness (Noitulove)

Three young men at a bar drink Guinness. Suddenly the action pauses and the film starts to play in reverse. The men walk backwards out of the bar. As they walk they seamlessly go back down the evolutionary chain through hundreds, thousands, millions of years. Super: GUINNESS. Good things come to those who wait.

Advertising Agency: Abbott, Mead, Vickers, BBDO, UK
Creative Director: Paul Brazier
Art Director: Matt Doman
Copywriter: Ian Heartfield
Production Company: Kleinman Productions, London
Director: Danny Kleinman

Alternative Grand Prix – Sony (Balls)

Dropping 250,000 brightly coloured bouncy balls down the streets of San Francisco for real = colour like no other.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative Director: Richard Flintman
Art Director: Juan Cabral
Copywriter: Juan Cabral
Production Company: MJZ, London
Director: Nicolai Fuglsig

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Grand Prix 2007 – Dove (Evolution)

We created a film that exposed the manipulation of the female image in the media. The objective was to encourage discussion around the subject of real beauty and lead people to the campaignforrealbeauty website.”

Advertising Agency: Ogilvy & Mother Toronto
Creative Director: Janet Kestin, Nancy Vonk
Art Director: Tim Piper, Mike Kirkland
Copywriter: Tim Piper
Production Company: Reginald Pike, Toronto
Director: Yael Staav, Tim Piper

Alternative Grand Prix – Epuron (Power of Wind)

Wind has a strong nature. Better keep him busy…

Advertising Agency: Nordpol + Hamburg, Germany
Creative Director: Lars Ruehmann
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann, Joakim Reveman
Copywriter: Matthew Branning
Production Company: Paranoid Projects, USA
Director: The Vikings

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Grand Prix 2008 – Cadbury (Gorilla)/Microsoft (Halo 3 Campaign)

We hear ‘In the air tonight’ by Phil Collins as we realize we’re in front of a calm looking gorilla. ‘I’ve been waiting for this moment for all of my life…’ The ape stretches its neck like a heavyweight boxer would do before a fight. He’s sitting in front of a massive drum kit as the best drum fill of the history of rock is coming. The Gorilla knows this. He smashes the drums phenomenally – feeling every beat. The camera leaves the ape and his drum. United, the way they are meant to be.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative Director: Richard Flinthan, Juan Cabral
Art Director: Juan Cabral
Copywriter: Juan Cabral
Production Company: Blink, London
Director: Juan Cabral

On-line, the Halo 3 website served as a virtual museum, providing an interactive fly through of the entire John 117 monument and putting visitors right in the middle of the fight. They could also learn more about our enemies and hear first hand stories from the men who were there. For that we filmed interviews with surviving veterans of the battle who served with Master Chief. They talked about their experiences and spoke with reverence and awe about what it was like to serve with mankind’s greatest hero.

Advertising Agency: T.A.G. San Francisco/McCann Worldgroup
Creative Director: Geoff Edwars, Scott Duchon
Art Director: Ben Wolan
Copywriter: Rich Herrera
Production Company: Go Film, Hollywood/RSA Films Los Angeles
Director: Simon McQuoid, Rupert Sanders, Neil Blomkamp

Alternative Grand Prix – Nike (Next Level)

“Next Level” is new take on Football from Nike. Made to inspire football obsessed teens, the film is a first-person journey up the football ranks–from being discovered by Arsenal in a youth match to a life-defining moment playing for our national side. Along the way we experience success (finishing a cross from Cesc Fabregas) as well as frustration (getting burned by Ronaldinho). The film celebrates playing the game with purpose and passion. It shows what it takes to become a modern, brilliant fofotballer – to take your game to the next level.

Advertising Agency: 72 And Sunny, USA
Creative Director: Glen Cole, John Boiler, Bryan Rowles, Jason Norcross
Production Company: Anonymous Content, USA
Director: Guy Ritchie

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Grand Prix 2009 – Philips (Carousel)

Philips set out to own the idea of a cinematic viewing experience at home. From the start the strategy was to create a film that movie lovers would want to see.

The film is hosted within a site that, through interaction, educates the audience about the three main features of Philips televisions – Ambilight, Cinema 21:9 and Picture Quality – and ties these features to the act of film making. So, what would movie lovers want to see? We decided on a seamless tracking shot, one long take that a film loving audience could marvel at and be fascinated by. Within the ‘housing’ of a tracking shot we inserted behind the scenes glimpses where the experts could talk about their craft and the decisions they made whilst filming the shot. The DOP on lighting, the Director on the 21:9 format and VFX supervisor shows why picture quality is so important. To allow for more interaction, we decided that a frozen time film, shot using a state of the art motion control rig, would give the audience control upon interaction allowing them to literally move the camera back and forth frame by frame. This is done intuitively through a ‘grabbing hand’ cursor when the screen is moused over.

What makes this interaction really special is the interactive cinematic score. The score, composed by Michael Fakesch, was composed as a linear piece, but was then handed over to a flash music developer to carve up and distort as the user moved back and forth through time, frame by frame – all designed to pull the audience in and hold them there longer whilst they try to unravel the mystery of how the film was made.

The second main element of interaction is the way the audience is able to trigger the three behind-the-scenes educational scenes from the film’s timeline. When the user clicks on the timeline, they reveal films within the film. The timeline unfolds and expands, the post production disappears, each expert walks in and the rigging reappears revealing that all along the actors were simply holding their position whilst a state of the art motion rig captured them in frozen time. All this was designed to be as seamless as possible with maximum visual reward ensuring the audience clicked all three of the hotspots.

In addition to the interaction within the film, the ratio of the film itself could be changed at anytime through first person interaction. This simple, but effective comparison tool really did get across the spectacle of the new Philips 21:9 TV. The other elegantly simple piece of interaction is Ambilight on and off, in the words of the DOP – “you really miss it when it’s not there.”  A final point worth noting is the dynamic title sequence. Instead of a traditional loader, we crafted a title sequence correspond to the speed of the users internet connection. The slower the connection, the longer the sequence.

Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB Amsterdam
Creative Director: Michael Fakesch, Chris Baylis, Andrew Ferguson
Art Director: Mariota Essery, Maximilliano Chanan
Copywriter: Carla Madden
Production Company: Stink Digital, London
Director: Adam Berg

Alternative Grand Prix – T-Mobile (Dance)

On 15th January at 11am, a single commuter started dancing in the middle of a train station. The dance grew as more dancers joined in, until there were over 300 people perfectly choreographed. The excitement caused hundred’s of genuine unsuspecting members of the public to join in and share the moment.

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, London
Creative Director: Paul Silburn, Kate Stanners
Art Director: Rick Dodds
Copywriter: Stephen Howell
Production Company: Partizan, London
Director: Michael Gracey

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Grand Prix 2010 – Old Spice (The Men Your Man Could Smell Like)

This TV commercial was created to appeal to men as well as women, showing them both how great a man can smell when they use Old Spice Body Wash.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Creative Director: Mark Fitzloff, Susan Hoffman
Art Director: Craig Allen, Eric Kallman
Copywriter: Craig Allen, Eric Kallmacanal
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Tom Kuntz

Alternative Grand Prix – Canal + (Closet)

Canal+ launched its new ‘Original Creativity’ campaign in September 2009. The objective highlight to Canal+’s showcase of original programming, consisting of series, documentaries and fictions, created exclusively by and for Canal+, scripted by prestigious writers such as Olivier Marchal and Jean- Hugues Anglade. To launch this new campaign, we produced THE CLOSET. The film unites quality, humour, originality and a touch of impertinence inherent to the brand’s communications: ‘Never underestimate the power of a great story”

Advertising Agency: BETC EURO RSCG, Paris
Creative Director: Stephane Xiberras
Art Director: Eric Astorgue
Copywriter: Jean Christophe Royer
Production Soixan7e Quin5e, Paris
Director: Matthijs van Heijningen

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Grand Prix 2011 – Nike (Write the Future)

Every four years, the keys to football heaven are dangled in front of the international elite. One goal, one pass, one game saving tackle can be the difference between fame and forgotten. What happens on the pitch in that split second has a ripple effect that goes beyond the match and the tournament.
‘Write the Future’ was a messaging platform that allowed Nike to show how football creates this ripple effect. It allowed us to give a glimpse into the future to see what the players were really playing for, in their own lives and the lives of those that follow them. Our goal was to weave the brand into the conversations around this major tournament in a way that celebrated the participating teams and athletes and engaged football fans around the world.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Amsterdam
Creative Director: Jeff Kling, Mark Bernath, Eric Quennoy
Art Director: Stuart Harkness, Freddie Powell
Copywriter: Stuart Harkness, Freddie Powell
Production Company: Independent Films, London
Director: Alejandro Gonzales Inarritu

Alternative Grand Prix – Volkswagen (The Force)/Crysler (Born of Fire)

For the all-new 2012 Passat , Volkswagen brings Star Wars™ to one of TV’s most talked about events. Accompanied by John Williams’ iconic “The Imperial March,” the spot features the most infamous villain in the galaxy, a pint-sized Darth Vader who uses the Force when he discovers the all-new 2012 Passat in the driveway. The two iconic brands leverage humor and the unforgettable Star Wars score to create an emotional spot and make Super Bowl ad history.

Advertising Agency: Deutsch, Los Angeles
Creative Director: Eric Springer, Michael Kadin
Art Director: Ryan Mclaughlin, Craig Melchiano
Copywriter: David Povill
Production Park Pictures, Santa Monica
Director: Lance Acord

Of the big three American car companies, Chrysler was in the most danger of failing. Had there not been a last-minute vote of confidence from the U.S. Government, they would not exist. This was public knowledge, debated throughout the country—should we have loaned Chrysler the money?  When it came time to introduce a new product, we had a car to sell and also had to win back America’s confidence. To do this, we took the unlikely position of embracing Chrysler’s Detroit heritage when every other American car company was distancing themselves from the city.  We created a 2-minute homage to Detroit, a city primed for a comeback, and ran the spot only once, on Super Bowl Sunday.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy Portland
Creative Director: Mark Fitzloff, Susan Hoffman, Aaron Allen
Art Director: Jim Lasser
Copywriter: Mark Fitzloff, Joe Staples, Kevin Jones, Greg Rutter, Dan Kroeger
Production: Serial Pictures, Culver City
Director: Samuel Bayer


Villarrosas Barcelona for Honda (2007/2008) – The Power of Dreams (Imported from Spain)

Honda Motors – Dreaming about Campaign (2007)

Creative Director: Oriol Villar/Fernando Codina
Illustrator/Typographer: Brosmind
Gold Lion and Silver Lion for the campaign

Honda ACC – Starlings (2007)

Campaign to present the latest technological innovation by Honda, ACC. A system that allows you to keep your distance from the vehicle in front.
Creative Director: Oriol Villar/Fernando Codina
Copywriter: Miguel Angels Alizalde
Production Company: Agosto, Barcelona
Director: Nacho Gayan
Shortlist

Honda CR-V – Landscapeometer (2008)

The idea is to replace the numbers of a odometer with images of landscapes because with the Honda CR-V you don’t cover miles, you experience them.
Creative Director: Oriol Villar/Fernando Codina
Art Director: Michele Salati
Production Company: Agosto, Barcelona
Director: David Ruiz

Honda CR-V – Landscapeometer/Internet Film (2008)

SUVs (Sport Utility Vehicle) are very appreciated by the consumer because of their versatility. However, although their technology has evolved a lot, SUVs are still less efficient on asphalt. Honda engineers designed the new CR-V with the idea to get a SUV with real on-road performance – basically because it is where consumers cover the biggest part of the kilometers.
So the communication objective was to present a car made to enjoy any kind of travel from the beginning till the end and to do it with the specific Honda’s tone of voice: human and passionate. The idea behind this internet commercial is to replace the numbers of a mileometer with images of landscapes because with the Honda CR-V you don’t cover miles, you experience them.
Creative Director: Oriol Villar/Fernando Codina
Art Director: Michele Salati
Production Company: Villarrosas, Barcelona
Director: Brosmind


Honda – The story of Cog



In 2002 Honda Motor Company was the number-three Japanese automobile manufacturer in the world, behind Toyota and Nissan. While Honda’s automobile sales in Japan and the United States were considered strong, sales in the United Kingdom and mainland Europe were thought to be weak, even though automobile production in the United Kingdom had been ongoing for a decade. Further, Honda vehicle sales had been declining in these regions since 1998. In response to these problems Honda hired ad agency Wieden+Kennedy’s London office to create an advertising campaign that would directly address the issues. ‘‘The Power of Dreams’’, released in 2002, was an omnipresent campaign in the United Kingdom and beyond, using television, direct mail, radio, posters, press, interactive television, cinema, magazines, motor shows, press launches, dealerships, postcards, beermats (coasters), and even traffic cones. It built upon Honda’s company slogan, ‘‘Yume No Chikara,’’ which was first endorsed in the 1940s by the company’s founder, Soichiro Honda. Translated into English, it meant to ‘‘see’’ one’s dreams. Wieden+Kennedy used this phrase as the basis of its question to consumers: ‘‘Do you believe in the power of dreams?’. 

The global campaign, which centered on this tagline, included print and television components starring ASIMO, a humanoid robot developed by Honda. While the ASIMO ads gained widespread recognition, the 2003 television commercial called ‘‘Cog’’ was clearly a pinnacle of the campaign. In a single take with no special effects, more than 85 individual parts of the new Accord interacted in a complicated chain reaction.

Cog was first aired on British television on Sunday 6 April 2003. The full 120-second version of the advertisement aired only 10 times in all, and only in the 10 days after the initial screening. The slots were chosen for maximum impact, mostly in high-profile sporting events. The campaign was tremendously successful both critically and financially. The media reaction to the advertisement was equally effusive, with articles appearing in both broadsheets such as The Daily Telegraph, The Independent, and The Guardian.

The full version was then put aside in favour of a 60-second and five 30-second variations, which continued to air for a further six weeks. These shortened versions made use of newly-introduced interactive options on the Sky Digital television network. Viewers were encouraged to press a button on their remote control, bringing up a menu that allowed the viewer to see the full 120-second version of the advertisement. Other menu options included placing an order for a free documentary DVD and a brochure for the Honda Accord.



The DVD, which was also included as an insert in 1.2 million newspapers in the first week of the commercial’s rollout, contained a “making-of” documentary featuring interviews and behind-the-scenes footage of the production process, a virtual tour of the Accord, the original music video to “Rapper’s Delight” by the Sugarhill Gang, and an illustrated guide to all the parts shown in Cog. The interactive 30-second versions of Cog proved hugely successful. Over 250,000 people used the menu option, spending an average of two and a half minutes in the dedicated advertising area. A significant number watched the looped 120-second version for up to ten minutes. Of those who opened the menu, 10,000 requested either a DVD or a brochure, and Honda used the data collected from the interactive option to arrange a number of test drive.

The Script

Cog opens with a close-up on a transmission bearing rolling down a board into a synchro hub. The hub in turn rolls into a gear wheel cog, which falls off of the board and into a camshaft and pulley wheel. The camshaft swings around into the centre section of an mounted on top of an engine crankshaft assembly. The exhaust swings round and knocks into a series of 3 valve stems. The valve stems roll down a front bonnet placed on top of an alloy wheel rim, releasing an engine oil dipstick with a throttle actuator shaft on the end. The disptick flicks over an engine cam cover into a radiator.The radiator overturns, falling onto a wheel balanced on top of a water pump housing. This wheel rolls off and knocks into the first of a series of three weighted wheels, which roll up a ramp into brake disc. The disc falls onto a seatbelt which, using a suspension lower arm as a lever, pulls a rear seat back into an upright position. As it does so, the seat disturbs a front windscreen wiper blade attached to a pulley wheel. The wiper blade travels along a bonnet release cable and overturns a tin of engine oil. The tin empties its contents onto a lower shelf, which disturbs the balance of several valve springs against flywheel. The oil alters the balance enough to cause several of the springs to roll. The valve springs are slowed enough by the spilt oil to allow them to drop into a cylinder head assembly mounted on a seesaw constructed of a board placed on a rocker shaft and gear wheel cog. On the other end of the seesaw is a car battery. As the assembly drops, the battery is pushed into a cylinder block wired up to an engine fan. It completes the circuit, and the fan rolls across the open floor into an anti-lock braking system modulator unit. The modulator unit knocks a rear silencer box down a ramp and into a rear suspension link. The link pushes a transmission selector arm into a brake pedal loaded with a rubber brake grommet. The grommet launches into a tyre mounted on a front end assembly, knocking it off and onto a wire suspended between two brake discs. The wire pulls a con rod, rotating it into a cylinder liner. The liner rolls down an incline, slowed by another con rod, the electric window of a front door assembly, and a series of interior grab handles. It falls onto another battery, completing a circuit. The circuit powers a windscreen washer jet pointed at a windscreen. The automated water sensors in the windscreen activate a pair of wiper blades, causing them to crawl across the floor. The wipers release a handbrake lever keeping a quartet of suspended window panels in place. As the windows swing round, the resulting air draft knocks the liner panel of a rear tool tray into a rocker shaft, which rolls across the floor into a suspension coil spring. The collision causes enough of a vibration to knock a second shaft into a battery. This activates the Accord’s CD player (playing Sugarhill Gang’s “Rapper’s Delight”). The vibrations from the car speakers shake a coil spring just enough to set it rolling off a rear tailgate glass panel, and onto a brake pedal. Once pushed, the pedal causes a set of rear shock absorbers to depress, pushing a polenoid onto a button on an ignition key. The button remotely closes the hatchback of an assembled Honda Accord on a brake-disc-mounted trailer. The closing of the door causes the weight of the car to shift enough to start it rolling down the slope to its final position in front of a tonneau cover with “Accord” printed on it, weighted with a wheel hub assembly. The piece closes with a voiceover from writer Garrison Keillor, who asks, “Isn’t it nice when things just work?”. The screen then cuts to a plain white background, where the Honda logo fades into the centre of the screen. The black text “The Power of Dreams” fades in shortly after the Honda logo has completely faded in.

The Making of



The Honda executives were intrigued, but demanded a cut using actual automotive parts before giving permission to go ahead with the full-scale projects. Once Cog was green-lit with a budget of £1 million, Gooden and Walker wasted no time in recruiting a London-based team to go through the logistics of the shoot in detail. The team, which comprised engineers, special effect technicians, car designers, and even a sculptor, spent a month working with parts from a disassembled Honda Accord before the design for the advertisement’s set was even finalised. Approval for the script took another month. Honda insisted that several specific Accord features, such as a door with a wing-mirror indicator and a rain-sensitive windscreen, appear in the final cut. The company planned to highlight these features in sales brochures. Antoine Bardou-Jacquet was brought on to direct the piece. Bardou-Jacquet was mostly known for directing several award-winning music videos.

Bardou-Jacquet wanted to compose the advertisement with as little computer-generated imagery as possible, believing that the final product would be that much more appealing to its audience. To this end, he set two months aside for the creation of hundreds of conceptual drawings detailing various possible interactions between the parts, and a further four months for practical testing and development. For the testing phase, the script was broken into small segments, each comprising only one or two interactions. Ideas deemed unworkable by the testing crew, such as airbag explosions and collisions between front and rear sections of the car, were abandoned, and the remaining segments were slowly brought together until the full and final sequence was developed. The final cut of Cog consists of two continuous sixty-second dolly shots taken from a technocrane, stitched together later in post-production.
Four days of filming were required to get these two shots, two days for each minute-long section. Filming sessions lasted seven hours and the work was exacting, as some parts needed to be positioned with an accuracy of a sixteenth of an inch. Despite the detailed instructions derived from the testing period, small variations in ambient temperature, humidity and settling dust continually threw off the movement of the parts enough to end the sequence early. It took 90 minutes on the first day just to get the initial transmission bearing to roll correctly into the second. Between testing and filming, 606 takes were needed to capture the final cut. The team commandeered two of Honda’s six hand-assembled Accords—one to roll off the trailer at the end of the advertisement, the other to be stripped for parts. While several sections of the early scripts had to be abandoned due to the total unavailability of certain Accord components, by the time production finished the accumulated spare parts filled two articulated lorries.

Cog needed only limited post-production work, as the decision had been made early on to eschew computer-generated imagery wherever possible. To further reduce the work required in post, Flame artist Barnsley  from the post-production company The Mill, spent a lot of time on set during filming, where he advised the film crew on whether particular sections could be accomplished more easily by re-shooting or in post. Even so, the constant movement of the components on-camera made it difficult to achieve a seamless transition between the two 60-second shots. Several sections also required minor video editing, such as re-centering the frame to stay closer to the action, removal of wires, highlighting a spray of water, and adjusting the pace for dramatic purposes.

Plagiarism accusations

Shortly after Cog appeared on television, Wieden+Kennedy received a letter from Peter Fischli and David Weiss, creators of the 1987 art film “Der Lauf der Dinge”. The art film was well known in the advertising industry, and its creators had been approached several times with offers for the right to use the concept, but had always declined.

The letter pointed out several similarities between their work and Cog, and warned the agency that they were considering legal action on the basis of the “commercialisation and simplification of the film’s content and the false impression that [they] might have endorsed the use”. When interviewed by Creative Review magazine, the pair made clear that they wished they had been consulted on the advertisement, and that they would not have given permission if asked. Media publications quickly picked up the story, and asserted that Fishcli and Weiss were already in the process of litigation against the car manufacturer.  Ultimately, Fischli and Weiss never filed a lawsuit against either Wieden+Kennedy or Honda UK, but their accusations continue to colour perceptions of the work within the advertising community.

Awards

Having swept the majority of award ceremonies within the advertising community to date, Cog was widely believed to be the favourite for the industry’s top award, the Grand Prix at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival. Cog held a disadvantage in that the chairman of the Cannes voting jury, Dan Wieden, was one of the founders of Wieden+Kennedy, the firm responsible for creating Cog; tradition holds that it is bad form for the chairman of the jury to vote for a piece by his or her own agency. Despite the lingering shadow of these accusations, Cog drew an unprecedented amount of critical acclaim. It received more awards than any commercial in history; so many that it was both the most-awarded commercial of 2004 and the 33rd-most-awarded commercial of 2003. The jury for the British Television Advertising Awards gave the piece the highest score of any commercial ever recorded; the jury’s chairman Charles Inge commented: “My own opinion is that this is the best commercial that I have seen for at least ten years.” After awarding Cog with several Silver awards, the president-elect of the D&AD Awards, Dick Powell, said of the piece: “It delights and entrances, [...] it communicates engineering quality and quality of thinking, and leaves you with a smile.”

The result at Cannes was a surprise; after the longest judging period in the festival’s history, the Grand Prix went to neither of the two event favourites. Instead, the jury awarded the prize to Lamp a U.S. advertisement directed by Spike Jonze for the IKEA chain of furniture stores. Chief among speculated reasons for the outcome was the plagiarism debate surrounding Cog. Ben Walker told “A couple of people on the jury told me the reason it didn’t win is ’cause they didn’t want to be seen to be awarding something which people in some corners had said we copied.”

Homages and Parody

The popularity and recognition received by Cog led a number of other companies to create pieces in a similar vein, either as homages, in parody, or simply to further explore the design area. The first of these was Just Works, a deliberate parody advertisement for the 118 118 Directory Assistance Service in the summer of 2003, in which the Honda parts are replaced with such oddities as a tractor wheel, a flamingo and a space hopper, although what makes this advertisement different is that the familiar 118 118 runners simply push the items forward to keep things going. Campaign magazine listed Cog, along with Balls for the Sony Bravia as one of the most-imitated commercials in recent times.


Advertising Agency:  Wieden+Kennedy, London
Creative Director:  Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth
Copywriter:  Ben Walker
Art Director: Matt Gooden
Production Company:  Partizan, London
Director:  Antoine Bardou-Jacquet
Year: 2003


Honda – The story of Grrr



Honda introduced their i-CTDi diesel car engine in 2004 with what became a multi-award-winning television commercial known as “Grrr” and “Hate/Change”. We open up on an animated scene – tropical flowers, green manicured meadows, crystal clear lakes and mountains lit by sun rays. The hedges are trimmed with the letters, H, A, T and E. We soon see why the environment has developed this ‘hate’. Noisy, smoky diesel engines zoom through the environment, hassling the wildlife. The rainbow gives one of the engines the flick. White bunny rabbits take on ear muffs before shooting arrows at an engine. And hey – something changes. The engine is now clean, noiseless and friendly to the environment.

The concept for the ad comes from the Honda lead engineer being asked to design a diesel engine. Kenichi Nagahiro had long resisted the idea, on the grounds that diesel engines were smelly and noisy, bad for the environment. But his hate for the diesel engine led to the development of a new engine much kinder on the eyes, ears and nose, not to mention the animals. The engine was fitted in the new Accord and introduced to the UK in early 2004.

The lyrics for the Honda Diesel Hate ad are sung by Garrison Keillor, American author and voice artist, along with Wieden + Kennedy writers and whistlers Michael Russoff, Sean Thompson and Richard Russell, under the band name “Be Nice to the Pigeons”.

Here’s a little song for anyone who’s ever hated…
in the key of Grr

Can hate be good?
Can hate be great?
Can hate be good?
Can hate be great?
Can hate be something we don’t hate?
Whistling…

We’d like to know
why it is so
that certain diesels must be slow
and thwack and thrum
and pong and hum
can clatter clat
Hate something
Change something
Hate something change something
Make something better
Whistling…

Oh isn’t it just bliss
when a diesel goes just like this?
Whistling…

Sing it like you hate it…
Hate something
Change something
Hate something
Change something
Make something better

The ad features creatures associated with environmental protection, innocence and joy… butterflies, swans, peacock, deer, humming birds, frog, chickens, bunnies, seahorses, turtles, goats, penguins, pink flamingos, robin, dolphins, seals and a ladybird.
The campaign also came out with an online flash-based game featuring a rabbit that visits nine environments, eats carrots, and changes shoddy technology into environmentally friendly features.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 27 Sep 2004

HONDA ASKS – CAN HATE BE GOOD?

Honda’s latest TV ad has Garrison Keillor singing …. and explains why hate can sometimes be a positive emotion!
‘Hate something, change something’ is the theme for Honda’s first ever diesel engine TV commercial, which breaks this week (1 Oct). Entitled ‘Grrr-, the 90 second commercial takes the viewer on a journey through an optimistic animated world of ‘positive hate’. The film tells the story behind the creation of Honda’s first diesel in a unique way. Kenichi Nagahiro, the company’s chief engine designer and inventor of the celebrated VTEC engine, hated diesel engines, hated how noisy, smelly and dirty they were. When asked to design Honda’s first diesel he flatly refused – unless he was allowed to start completely from scratch. The result is one of the cleanest, most refined diesel engines on the market today, the 2.2 i-CTDi. Cute bunnies, pretty flowers and rainbows – things typically associated with positive imagery – show their dislike of dirty, noisy, smelly diesel engines by destroying them in exchange for something better. They joyfully celebrate the arrival of Honda’s new diesel. And throughout the film Garrison Keillor sings a specially written folk song in which he asks the question ‘Can hate be good?’ Wieden + Kennedy, which produced the advertisement, were captivated by the idea of talking about Hate as something positive, a passionate force that could actually be turned to good use, and the slogan ‘Hate Something, Change Something’ was born. ‘One of the biggest challenges was how to talk about hate in a really positive way that felt right for Honda,- says Kim Papworth, Creative Director at Wieden + Kennedy, London. ‘Writing a song and creating an animated world of positive hate was the natural next step. The commercial breaks as a 90- in cinemas from 24 September and launches on TV from 1 October as a 90- and 60-. The campaign will be supported by press, radio, and interactive TV, as well as extensive content on Honda.co.uk.

Honda Grrr on Wikipedia

Advertising Agency: Wieden+Kenndy, London
Executive Creative Director: Wave London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson/Kim Papworth
Copywriter: Sean Thompson/Michael Russoff/Richard Russell
Art Director: Sean Thompson/Michael Russoff/Richard Russell
Production Company: Nexus Productions, London
Director: Adam Foulkes/Alan Smith


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