British Airways – Plane Detecting Billboards

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British Airways has unveiled digital billboards which will ‘interact’ with aircrafts flying overhead, as the brand looks to remind customers how magical flying can be, from the perspective of children. Developed by Ogilvy 12th Floor, the ads use custom built surveillance technology which tracks the aircraft and interrupts the digital display just as it passes over the site, revealing the image of a child pointing at the plane overhead accompanied by its flight number and destination it’s arriving from. This will be accompanied by a relevant message to the flight, such as ‘Fly the new A380 to Los Angeles. ba.com/lookup’, or details such as the lowest fare available or the temperature at the destination.

Abigail Comber, British Airways’ head of marketing, said: “This is a first, not just for British Airways but for UK advertising. We all know from conversations with friends and family that we wonder where the planes are going and dream of an amazing holiday or warm destination. The clever technology allows this advert to engage people there and then and answer that question for them. We hope it will create a real ‘wow’ and people will be reminded how amazing flying is and how accessible the world can be.”

The destinations can also be updated immediately depending on changing focus routes for the airline. The ads are part of the airlines’ “Magic of Flying” campaign, which aims to remind people of how magical flying can be, especially from the eyes of a child. The “interactive” billboards are located in London’s Piccadilly Circus and Chiswick.


The Clowns – BETC Paris for Canal+

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On the 21st of September CANAL+ launches a new channel, fully dedicated to series, which will be automatically included in the subscription.

The campaign, created by BETC Paris, is a tribute to series and their addictiveness – once you start watching you’re dying to see what happens next… This idea was the starting point for the creative team, the same one as behind The Closet and The Bear. The film was shot in Vancouver during the summer. It was directed by Steve Rogers through Wanda and is followed by an outdoor campaign all over France.

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“The idea was to make an intriguing film that creates suspense – you can’t wait to find out how it ends. Just like when you watch a good series.
This was one of the reasons we chose dwarf clowns; in great series there’s often something a bit odd about the unusual characters that makes you become attached to them (a cop serial killer, a depressed Mafioso, a family of undertakers…). – Stéphane Xiberras, CCO and President BETC Paris.

Advertising Agency: BETC Paris
EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Stephane Xiberras COPYWRITER : Jean-Christophe Royer
ART DIRECTOR: Eric Astorgue
ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR: Damien Binello
STRATEGIC PLANNING: Clarisse Lacarrau, Vianney Vaute TRAFIC : Coralie Chasset
PRODUCTION COMPANY: Wanda
DIRECTOR: Steve Rogers


15 Most Insightful Call for Entries Ads

1 – ADC-UA Awards (Ukraine)/Agency: Leo Burnett Ukraine

2 – The 2002 Marketing Awards/Agency: Taxi Canadamarketing-awards-hack-small-18780

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3 – Art Director’s Club CdF 2006/Photographer Vincent Dixon

4 – The Art Directors Club CfE 2002/Bozell New York

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5 – The Singapore Creative Circle Awards 1997/Leo Burnett Singapore

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6 – Creative Club of Belgium (Call for entry 2005)/Agency: Duval Guilarme, Brussels

7 – The KBP Radio Awards, C.f.E 2007/Agency: BBDO Guerrera Ortega, Philippines

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8 – The Art Director’s Club CdF 2009/Agency: Publicis New York

9 – Clio Awards 2004/Agency: ALMAP/BBDO

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10 – The Art Director’s Club Cdf 2011/Agency: DDB New York

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11 – Crèa Awards 2007/Agency: BOS, Canada

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12 – The One Club Call for Entries 2007/Agency: Jupiter Drawing Room, South Africa

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13 – AdAwards Call for Entries 2006/Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, Paris

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14 – ADC 92° Annual Awards/Agency: The Conquistadors Collective, New York

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15 – The Tinta Awards Call for Entries 2012/Agency: Young & Rubicam Philippines

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From Coke to Mikado – Don’t Underestimate the Power of a Red Button

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Mikado – Resistance Test

Advertising Agency: Buzzman, Paris, France
CEO / Creative Director: Georges Mohammed-Chérif
Art Director: Louis Audard
Copywriter: Tristan Daltroff
Art Director Assistant: Clément Séchet
Year: 2013

 

TNT TV Channel – Dramatic surprise on an ice-cold day

Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume Modem, Brussels
Creative Director: Geoffrey Hantson, Katrien Bottez
Copywriter: Dieter De Ridder
Art Director: Ad Van Ongeval
Production Company: Czar
Director: Koen Mortier
Year: 2013

 

Fantastic Delites – How Far Would You Go?

The Delite-o-matic is an interactive vending machine that dispenses free packs of Fantastic Delites simply by pushing a button hundreds of times or by performing challenges. The Delite-o-matic was put out on the streets to prove that because Fantastic Delites taste so good, people will go to incredible lengths to get their hands on them.

Advertising Agency: Clemenger BBDO, Australia
Creative Director: Karl Fleet
Digital Creative / Art Director: Oliver Prenton
Digital Creative / Copywriter: Matt O’Grady
Year: 2012

 

TNT TV Channel – Big Red Push Button

To launch the high quality TV channel TNT in Belgium we placed a big red push button on an average Flemish square of an average Flemish town. A sign with the text “Push to add drama” invited people to use the button.

Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume Modem, Brussels
Creative Director: Geoffrey Hantson, Katrien Bottez
Copywriter: Dieter De Ridder
Art Director: Ad Van Ongeval
Production Company: Czar
Director: Koen Mortier
Year: 2012

 

Coca-Cola – Happiness Truck

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Where will happiness strike next?

Advertising Agency: Definition 6, Atlanta
Year: 2011


Air France/Music in the Sky – The Sky Has Something to Say

Air France Music is known and renowned for its exclusive musical selections. As suitable for an airline company, they are now inviting music lovers to turn their heads towards the sky with the new iPhone application “Music in the Sky”, designed by its agency BETC.

The principle is both poetic and fun: exclusive tunes are hidden in the clouds and all you have to do is catch them by lifting your iPhone, which automatically adds them to your playlist. Anyone with an iPhone can use the app, but travelling passengers will also have the privilege of discovering new tracks depending on where they are in the world: from Paris to Tokyo to Buenos Aires, the sky will hide its own music.

For the first time, thanks to the application, Air France Music fans will be able to listen to the “on air” selections played on board the planes also on terra firma. To celebrate the launch, unreleased tracks from François & the Atlas Mountains, Eugene McGuinness, Villagers, Melody’s Echo Chamber and Tomorrow’s World will be revealed. Finally, throughout the year, Air France Music will organise competitions in the app with the chance to win unreleased tracks, concert tickets or even plane tickets. The Air France Music application can be downloaded free in the Apple Store.

Advertising Agency: BETC
Creative Director: Florence Bellisson
Art Director: Sebastien Partika, Esteban Lebour, Alexandre Saad
Copywriter: Edouard olhagaray, Guillaume Rebbot
Web Designer: Bernard Quarante
Year: 2012


BETC Euro RSCG for Sci Fi Channel – Adopt Sci Fi (Integrated Campaign)

In 2008 BETC Euro RSCG created this integrated campaign, which incorporated ambient, radio, press, film and on-line elements, to raise awareness of the Sci Fi Channel in France. The campaign was based around ten alien “children” toys that were placed in different locations acros eight French cities. Fans were then encouraged to search for them by following clues found on a website and in radio ads. Posters were also displayed around towns to advertise the website. The intention was to create an emotional link between the Brand and people who were not already fans of science fiction. Each alien found earned its rescuer a reward of 500 euros. When nine of the figures had been located it was revealed that the tenth had been placed in an orphanage, where it could be interacted with via a website and a page on Facebook.

The treasure hunt apect of the campaign appealed to fans of the Sci Fi Channel, while also attracting new viewers to the brand.


Advertising Agency: BETC Euro RSCG, Paris
Year: 2008


Wrangler/We Are Animals Campaign – The story behind the animals

In 2008, clothes company Wrangler put out a pitch to advertising agencies asking for help to reinvigorate the brand within the European youth market. It faced a specific image problem. “The problem was that Wrangler is an American brand, 125 years old, associated with middle America…” explains Fred Raillard of Parisian agency Fred & Farid. “So the perception of Wrangler was very much linked to the cowboy… But the cowboys in Europe was negative, because the cowboy means old, white America. It’s Marlboro, it’s John Wayne, it’s the people behind the indian genocide. It’s George Bush, who was hated in Europe”.

Despite this, Fred & Farid, which won the pitch, felt it was important not to stray too far away from the brand’s root in its new advertising. “You cannot start from scratch with the communication of a brand thai is 125 years old” continues Fred. “You cannot. Especially as in America the communication about the cowboy was to carry on… So we tried to extract the values of the rodeo  – the wildness, being on an animal, roughness. Also, the positive aspects of cowboys – environment, nature, living with animals. Living in sinch with nature, having courage. We tried to extract some values that would connect with young people in Europe. The we thought: maybe we could just move from the cowboy to the animal… To the horse, in fact…”

This concept tied in with an old logo for the brand that the creative team found during their research. The logo from the 1970s saw the letters of the Wrangler name forming the shape of a horse. It may have been what Raillard describes as “cheesy”, but it meant that Fred & Farid’s idea of focusing on the brand’s associations to animals had a heritage. They then tested the concept on the target audience, and connected the idea with the culture of the time. “It was a period when we where facing a crisis” says Fred, “everything was collapsing, the banks were collapsing, and in that period of time we all had the feeling that our human society had reached a limit. So it was relevant to highlight that maybe we’d lost something when we lost our animality…”

The slogan WE ARE ANIMALS was decided upon, though Fred & Farid realized that this high concept ran the risk of backfiring if the execution of the ads was too heavy-handed. The key was to emphasize the animal instincts of humans, but in an unexpectede way. “The first thing we decided was to never show any animals…” says Fred. “To not create confusion – we’re talking about human animality, so the big mistake would be to show an animal. Then we thought with such a strong statement, we couldn’t play around, we had to really do it. The whole background had to be animalistic – spontaneous, not too intellectual. So we decided to set up a way of working on Wrangler that was more spontaneous and creative…”

The team decided to avoid too much planning and over-thinking before the shoot, and to employ a photographer who was skilled in attaining a raw, natural quality to their work. “We looked at photographers not from the ad industry but from art” says Fred. “People who in their personal work are passionate about showing human animality, celebrating animality in humans. We choose Ryan McGinley, as already in his personal work he was really driven by the whole idea of our animality…”

McGinley’s shooting style is loose, and his work follows a tradition of documentary photography begun by artists such as Nan Goldin and Larry Clark. He developed his style in the late 1990s by documenting his friends and acquaintances in New York engaging in parties, sex and general hedonism. When he moved to more formal shoots, using models, he retained this naturalistic approach. A shoot of McGinley’s even a commercial one, will usually involve setting up loose parameters and scenarios, but otherwise letting events evolve naturally, with everything captured on camera.

Fred & Farid wholeheartedly embraced this style of working for Wrangler shoot, which took place in the New Jersey countryside over two nights. Twelve models were selected to take part, drawn not from professional agencies but from street-casting. Actors and performance artists were also among those chosen, and the shoot, when described by Fred, has the feel more of an art performance than a commercial exercise.

“It was a crazy shoot!” he says. “People made love in front of us… everybody got crazy for two nights. It was freezing like hell, we were wearing North Face jackets, and they were naked in nature! Everybody was amazing, everybody went for this art experience. We experimented with any idea that anybody had on set…”

Mcginley, and his assistant, Tim Barber, took thousands of photographs over the two nights, according to Fred. “So you don’t even have time to think about anything – any idea that anyone has you experiment with. It’s chaos, complete chaos… and inside this chaos some pearls pop up…”

The shoot resulted in a set of arresting images, which were used to create the posters that stood at the centre of the WE ARE ANIMALS campaign. Beyond the impact of the images themselfs, what is striking about the posters is the lack of overt branding. The brand’s logo appears at the bottom, alongside the tagline, but otherwise the photographs are given room to breathe, a highly unusual approch in billboard advertising today, where brands have a tendency to shout their messages.

Even the product itself is absent from many of the shoot. “We had to convince them” says Fred. “Clients want to show their product, but we really fought to convince them, to get them on board with us that it is more important to bring back the Wrangler attitude and make a connection with a new generation. They would never have done it by showing the denim, because even if it’s great denim, denim is not a surprising product. We all wear denim now…”

The WE ARE ANIMALS print and poster campaign is a great example of pure branding. Fred & Farid used other media to do the less exciting work of the ad campaign – using the Wrangler website to provide the vital product information, for example – but insisted that the posters be more ambiguous. It was a risk strategy that ultimately paid off for the jeans brand, injecting it with an edge and attitude that allowed Wrangler to stand out within an extremely crowded market.

Wrangler Jeans print advertising campaign, “We Are Animals”, won the Grand Prix for Print at Cannes International Advertising Festival.

The Wrangler campaign was developed at FFL Paris by executive creative directors Fred & Farid (Frederic Raillard and Farid Mokart), art directors/copywriters Julie Louison and Perinne Durand, copywriters Baptiste Clinet, Nicolas Lautier, Philippe Pinel, Frederick Lung. Filming was shot by  Ryan McGinley, known for his nude films.


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