British Airways – Plane Detecting Billboards

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British Airways has unveiled digital billboards which will ‘interact’ with aircrafts flying overhead, as the brand looks to remind customers how magical flying can be, from the perspective of children. Developed by Ogilvy 12th Floor, the ads use custom built surveillance technology which tracks the aircraft and interrupts the digital display just as it passes over the site, revealing the image of a child pointing at the plane overhead accompanied by its flight number and destination it’s arriving from. This will be accompanied by a relevant message to the flight, such as ‘Fly the new A380 to Los Angeles. ba.com/lookup’, or details such as the lowest fare available or the temperature at the destination.

Abigail Comber, British Airways’ head of marketing, said: “This is a first, not just for British Airways but for UK advertising. We all know from conversations with friends and family that we wonder where the planes are going and dream of an amazing holiday or warm destination. The clever technology allows this advert to engage people there and then and answer that question for them. We hope it will create a real ‘wow’ and people will be reminded how amazing flying is and how accessible the world can be.”

The destinations can also be updated immediately depending on changing focus routes for the airline. The ads are part of the airlines’ “Magic of Flying” campaign, which aims to remind people of how magical flying can be, especially from the eyes of a child. The “interactive” billboards are located in London’s Piccadilly Circus and Chiswick.


The Clowns – BETC Paris for Canal+

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On the 21st of September CANAL+ launches a new channel, fully dedicated to series, which will be automatically included in the subscription.

The campaign, created by BETC Paris, is a tribute to series and their addictiveness – once you start watching you’re dying to see what happens next… This idea was the starting point for the creative team, the same one as behind The Closet and The Bear. The film was shot in Vancouver during the summer. It was directed by Steve Rogers through Wanda and is followed by an outdoor campaign all over France.

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“The idea was to make an intriguing film that creates suspense – you can’t wait to find out how it ends. Just like when you watch a good series.
This was one of the reasons we chose dwarf clowns; in great series there’s often something a bit odd about the unusual characters that makes you become attached to them (a cop serial killer, a depressed Mafioso, a family of undertakers…). – Stéphane Xiberras, CCO and President BETC Paris.

Advertising Agency: BETC Paris
EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Stephane Xiberras COPYWRITER : Jean-Christophe Royer
ART DIRECTOR: Eric Astorgue
ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR: Damien Binello
STRATEGIC PLANNING: Clarisse Lacarrau, Vianney Vaute TRAFIC : Coralie Chasset
PRODUCTION COMPANY: Wanda
DIRECTOR: Steve Rogers


15 Most Insightful Call for Entries Ads

1 – ADC-UA Awards (Ukraine)/Agency: Leo Burnett Ukraine

2 – The 2002 Marketing Awards/Agency: Taxi Canadamarketing-awards-hack-small-18780

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3 – Art Director’s Club CdF 2006/Photographer Vincent Dixon

4 – The Art Directors Club CfE 2002/Bozell New York

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5 – The Singapore Creative Circle Awards 1997/Leo Burnett Singapore

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6 – Creative Club of Belgium (Call for entry 2005)/Agency: Duval Guilarme, Brussels

7 – The KBP Radio Awards, C.f.E 2007/Agency: BBDO Guerrera Ortega, Philippines

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8 – The Art Director’s Club CdF 2009/Agency: Publicis New York

9 – Clio Awards 2004/Agency: ALMAP/BBDO

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10 – The Art Director’s Club Cdf 2011/Agency: DDB New York

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11 – Crèa Awards 2007/Agency: BOS, Canada

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12 – The One Club Call for Entries 2007/Agency: Jupiter Drawing Room, South Africa

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13 – AdAwards Call for Entries 2006/Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, Paris

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14 – ADC 92° Annual Awards/Agency: The Conquistadors Collective, New York

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15 – The Tinta Awards Call for Entries 2012/Agency: Young & Rubicam Philippines

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From Coke to Mikado – Don’t Underestimate the Power of a Red Button

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Mikado – Resistance Test

Advertising Agency: Buzzman, Paris, France
CEO / Creative Director: Georges Mohammed-Chérif
Art Director: Louis Audard
Copywriter: Tristan Daltroff
Art Director Assistant: Clément Séchet
Year: 2013

 

TNT TV Channel – Dramatic surprise on an ice-cold day

Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume Modem, Brussels
Creative Director: Geoffrey Hantson, Katrien Bottez
Copywriter: Dieter De Ridder
Art Director: Ad Van Ongeval
Production Company: Czar
Director: Koen Mortier
Year: 2013

 

Fantastic Delites – How Far Would You Go?

The Delite-o-matic is an interactive vending machine that dispenses free packs of Fantastic Delites simply by pushing a button hundreds of times or by performing challenges. The Delite-o-matic was put out on the streets to prove that because Fantastic Delites taste so good, people will go to incredible lengths to get their hands on them.

Advertising Agency: Clemenger BBDO, Australia
Creative Director: Karl Fleet
Digital Creative / Art Director: Oliver Prenton
Digital Creative / Copywriter: Matt O’Grady
Year: 2012

 

TNT TV Channel – Big Red Push Button

To launch the high quality TV channel TNT in Belgium we placed a big red push button on an average Flemish square of an average Flemish town. A sign with the text “Push to add drama” invited people to use the button.

Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume Modem, Brussels
Creative Director: Geoffrey Hantson, Katrien Bottez
Copywriter: Dieter De Ridder
Art Director: Ad Van Ongeval
Production Company: Czar
Director: Koen Mortier
Year: 2012

 

Coca-Cola – Happiness Truck

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Where will happiness strike next?

Advertising Agency: Definition 6, Atlanta
Year: 2011


Air France/Music in the Sky – The Sky Has Something to Say

Air France Music is known and renowned for its exclusive musical selections. As suitable for an airline company, they are now inviting music lovers to turn their heads towards the sky with the new iPhone application “Music in the Sky”, designed by its agency BETC.

The principle is both poetic and fun: exclusive tunes are hidden in the clouds and all you have to do is catch them by lifting your iPhone, which automatically adds them to your playlist. Anyone with an iPhone can use the app, but travelling passengers will also have the privilege of discovering new tracks depending on where they are in the world: from Paris to Tokyo to Buenos Aires, the sky will hide its own music.

For the first time, thanks to the application, Air France Music fans will be able to listen to the “on air” selections played on board the planes also on terra firma. To celebrate the launch, unreleased tracks from François & the Atlas Mountains, Eugene McGuinness, Villagers, Melody’s Echo Chamber and Tomorrow’s World will be revealed. Finally, throughout the year, Air France Music will organise competitions in the app with the chance to win unreleased tracks, concert tickets or even plane tickets. The Air France Music application can be downloaded free in the Apple Store.

Advertising Agency: BETC
Creative Director: Florence Bellisson
Art Director: Sebastien Partika, Esteban Lebour, Alexandre Saad
Copywriter: Edouard olhagaray, Guillaume Rebbot
Web Designer: Bernard Quarante
Year: 2012


BETC Euro RSCG for Sci Fi Channel – Adopt Sci Fi (Integrated Campaign)

In 2008 BETC Euro RSCG created this integrated campaign, which incorporated ambient, radio, press, film and on-line elements, to raise awareness of the Sci Fi Channel in France. The campaign was based around ten alien “children” toys that were placed in different locations acros eight French cities. Fans were then encouraged to search for them by following clues found on a website and in radio ads. Posters were also displayed around towns to advertise the website. The intention was to create an emotional link between the Brand and people who were not already fans of science fiction. Each alien found earned its rescuer a reward of 500 euros. When nine of the figures had been located it was revealed that the tenth had been placed in an orphanage, where it could be interacted with via a website and a page on Facebook.

The treasure hunt apect of the campaign appealed to fans of the Sci Fi Channel, while also attracting new viewers to the brand.


Advertising Agency: BETC Euro RSCG, Paris
Year: 2008


Wrangler/We Are Animals Campaign – The story behind the animals

In 2008, clothes company Wrangler put out a pitch to advertising agencies asking for help to reinvigorate the brand within the European youth market. It faced a specific image problem. “The problem was that Wrangler is an American brand, 125 years old, associated with middle America…” explains Fred Raillard of Parisian agency Fred & Farid. “So the perception of Wrangler was very much linked to the cowboy… But the cowboys in Europe was negative, because the cowboy means old, white America. It’s Marlboro, it’s John Wayne, it’s the people behind the indian genocide. It’s George Bush, who was hated in Europe”.

Despite this, Fred & Farid, which won the pitch, felt it was important not to stray too far away from the brand’s root in its new advertising. “You cannot start from scratch with the communication of a brand thai is 125 years old” continues Fred. “You cannot. Especially as in America the communication about the cowboy was to carry on… So we tried to extract the values of the rodeo  - the wildness, being on an animal, roughness. Also, the positive aspects of cowboys – environment, nature, living with animals. Living in sinch with nature, having courage. We tried to extract some values that would connect with young people in Europe. The we thought: maybe we could just move from the cowboy to the animal… To the horse, in fact…”

This concept tied in with an old logo for the brand that the creative team found during their research. The logo from the 1970s saw the letters of the Wrangler name forming the shape of a horse. It may have been what Raillard describes as “cheesy”, but it meant that Fred & Farid’s idea of focusing on the brand’s associations to animals had a heritage. They then tested the concept on the target audience, and connected the idea with the culture of the time. “It was a period when we where facing a crisis” says Fred, “everything was collapsing, the banks were collapsing, and in that period of time we all had the feeling that our human society had reached a limit. So it was relevant to highlight that maybe we’d lost something when we lost our animality…”

The slogan WE ARE ANIMALS was decided upon, though Fred & Farid realized that this high concept ran the risk of backfiring if the execution of the ads was too heavy-handed. The key was to emphasize the animal instincts of humans, but in an unexpectede way. “The first thing we decided was to never show any animals…” says Fred. “To not create confusion – we’re talking about human animality, so the big mistake would be to show an animal. Then we thought with such a strong statement, we couldn’t play around, we had to really do it. The whole background had to be animalistic – spontaneous, not too intellectual. So we decided to set up a way of working on Wrangler that was more spontaneous and creative…”

The team decided to avoid too much planning and over-thinking before the shoot, and to employ a photographer who was skilled in attaining a raw, natural quality to their work. “We looked at photographers not from the ad industry but from art” says Fred. “People who in their personal work are passionate about showing human animality, celebrating animality in humans. We choose Ryan McGinley, as already in his personal work he was really driven by the whole idea of our animality…”

McGinley’s shooting style is loose, and his work follows a tradition of documentary photography begun by artists such as Nan Goldin and Larry Clark. He developed his style in the late 1990s by documenting his friends and acquaintances in New York engaging in parties, sex and general hedonism. When he moved to more formal shoots, using models, he retained this naturalistic approach. A shoot of McGinley’s even a commercial one, will usually involve setting up loose parameters and scenarios, but otherwise letting events evolve naturally, with everything captured on camera.

Fred & Farid wholeheartedly embraced this style of working for Wrangler shoot, which took place in the New Jersey countryside over two nights. Twelve models were selected to take part, drawn not from professional agencies but from street-casting. Actors and performance artists were also among those chosen, and the shoot, when described by Fred, has the feel more of an art performance than a commercial exercise.

“It was a crazy shoot!” he says. “People made love in front of us… everybody got crazy for two nights. It was freezing like hell, we were wearing North Face jackets, and they were naked in nature! Everybody was amazing, everybody went for this art experience. We experimented with any idea that anybody had on set…”

Mcginley, and his assistant, Tim Barber, took thousands of photographs over the two nights, according to Fred. “So you don’t even have time to think about anything – any idea that anyone has you experiment with. It’s chaos, complete chaos… and inside this chaos some pearls pop up…”

The shoot resulted in a set of arresting images, which were used to create the posters that stood at the centre of the WE ARE ANIMALS campaign. Beyond the impact of the images themselfs, what is striking about the posters is the lack of overt branding. The brand’s logo appears at the bottom, alongside the tagline, but otherwise the photographs are given room to breathe, a highly unusual approch in billboard advertising today, where brands have a tendency to shout their messages.

Even the product itself is absent from many of the shoot. “We had to convince them” says Fred. “Clients want to show their product, but we really fought to convince them, to get them on board with us that it is more important to bring back the Wrangler attitude and make a connection with a new generation. They would never have done it by showing the denim, because even if it’s great denim, denim is not a surprising product. We all wear denim now…”

The WE ARE ANIMALS print and poster campaign is a great example of pure branding. Fred & Farid used other media to do the less exciting work of the ad campaign – using the Wrangler website to provide the vital product information, for example – but insisted that the posters be more ambiguous. It was a risk strategy that ultimately paid off for the jeans brand, injecting it with an edge and attitude that allowed Wrangler to stand out within an extremely crowded market.

Wrangler Jeans print advertising campaign, “We Are Animals”, won the Grand Prix for Print at Cannes International Advertising Festival.

The Wrangler campaign was developed at FFL Paris by executive creative directors Fred & Farid (Frederic Raillard and Farid Mokart), art directors/copywriters Julie Louison and Perinne Durand, copywriters Baptiste Clinet, Nicolas Lautier, Philippe Pinel, Frederick Lung. Filming was shot by  Ryan McGinley, known for his nude films.


DDB Paris for Le Barran – The chicken you can trust

In 2006 the French poultry brand Le Barran is being promoted with a campaign created by DDB Paris that aims to prove that consumers can always trust a chicken raised in the open air. The campaign features various scenarios where people show their trust for a giant chicken.

Nobody would trust a chicken. Except if it comes from Le Barran Chicken. Then, a salesman can peacefully answer a phone in the back of a luxurious jeweller’s shop, leaving Le Barran Chicken facing alone two sumptuous necklaces; you’ll climb up a mountain face and be confident in your Chicken Cottage alpinist partner; you’ll let your daughter go out on a Saturday night with a Chicken cottage biker on a poxerful motorcycle; you’ll let your child learn how to swimm with a Chicken Cottage as teacher; you’ll take plane and fell confident knowing that the plane is in the hands of a Chicken Cottage pilot. In the last one, sees a man in a clothes shop unable to decide which shirt to buy. He ends up copying the chicken’s choice. The ads ends with a line that translates as: “Le Barran: it’s the chicken you can trust.”

Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Directors: Sylvain Thirache, Alexandre Hervè
Copywriters: Jerome Langlade, Marie-Eve Schoettle
Art Directors: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2005/2006
Bronze Lion for the campaign


Empreinte Lingerie – Sexy Hologram

A holographic model in lingerie appears and disappears in a shower of stars which animates on the window and conveys a sense of magic.

The video documents an amazing idea. Empreinte has just opened its store l’Atelier lingerie in Paris. So they had to come with some unique idea that would draw the passers-by attention. A holographic mannequin wearing l’Atelier lingerie appeared after 9 pm each night between May 23 and May 26, animating the window before disappearing in a shower of stars.

Advertising Agency: Carlin international
Production: Animatik Studio, Paris
Year: 2012


TBWA/Paris for Amnesty International – Death to the Death Penalty (the story behind the campaign)

On October 10 2010, the fourth European Day Against the Death Penalty, Amnesty International France launched a commercial to mobilise support amongst decision-makers and the general public for its campaign against the death penalty.

The film, created for Amnesty International France by advertising agency TBWA Paris, used life-like wax figures to depict four different methods of execution: firing squad, hanging, beheading and the electric chair. In each scenario, the wax figures melt then crumple – powerfully illustrating the campaign’s strap line: ‘Death to the Death Penalty’.

In a chiaroscuro mood, a firing squad is pointing guns to a prisoner. Characters made out candle wax start to melt down. Then, a hangman is just about to knock down the stool of the prisoner but the rope of the Gallows starts melting down and the scene dissolves. The sword of an executioner and the executioner himself melt down. And eventually, an electric chair meets the same fate. As a reveal, the sentence shaped in candle wax “Death to the death penalty” followed by the very own Amnesty candle logo explain us that Amnesty has put a death spell on the death penalty, that it’s own flame is burning down executioners.

French broadcasters agreed to show the ad at no cost to Amnesty International during an initial run of 30 ad slots. The commercial was then shown in independent cinemas across France for a further four weeks and the creative idea featuring wax figures was also used in accompanying print ads - including posters in Paris – and also direct mail.






The ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ campaign generated significant media coverage and interest both in France and further afield. The commercial was viewed more than 400,000 times online with 30,000 views via the Amnesty International France web site. The advertising has since been used by Amnesty international in more than a dozen other countries – an unusual step as the organisation usually commissions then implements its marketing campaigns locally, market by market.

“We were amazed that support for the work among Amnesty International activists was unanimous – which for us is extremely rare,” says Sylvie Haurat, Communications Director of Amnesty International France.

The Story
Although 96 countries have formally abolished it and many more have not used it in years, 58 nations still actively practice the death penalty. Campaigns for all countries to end capital punishment are ongoing, however, and at a General Assembly meeting in November 2010 the United Nations renewed its call for a moratorium on the death penalty. Ahead of this Amnesty International France, part of global human rights organisation Amnesty International, decided to run a publicity campaign about the issue. France was one of the first countries to formally abolish the death penalty. Amnesty International France wanted to remind the French public that 58 countries were yet to follow their country’s lead, and it hoped France would step up its influence to persuade governments yet to abolish the death penalty to do so.

Amnesty International France is one of 72 national ‘sections’ of Amnesty International, the organisation that campaigns for internationally-recognised human rights for all. Typically, it runs campaigns around three or four different human rights-related issues each year with advertising created and then implemented locally, market by market. Budgets are always very tight so much if not all of the creative development and production work involved is done for free with media space either provided pro bono or at a reduced cost.

We are very demanding client,” Sylvie Haurat says. “Not only do we have very little budget, we are extremely demanding when it comes to our concerns about ethics. And with the cross section of activists working for us, who all have strong opinions, it can be difficult to find campaign ideas on which everyone can agree.” 

In early 2009 Amnesty International France approached TBWA-Paris to develop the death penalty campaign. The organisation had worked with the agency for almost a decade on an ad hoc basis – a relationship that had already produced a number of highly successful campaigns – and the brief was clear.

“Amnesty International already has a worldwide initiative called ‘Count Down for a World Free from Capital Punishment’,” explains Anne-Laure Brunner, TBWA-Paris’ Account Director and Director of New Business. “They gave us the historical background and the Count Down context. They made it clear we needed to mobilise support and to do so by being positive about how close they now are to realising their goal. And they told us to make sure that nothing we produced was directly critical of any particular, individual country.”

A significant feature of the brief – and the TBWA-Paris creative team’s starting point – was how different the death penalty brief was to others for previous Amnesty International campaigns. Unlike most of the other issues Amnesty International campaigns on, the death penalty is a fight that’s close to being won. Because of this, Amnesty International France wanted to do something different to most of our other campaigns – to be more positive. “It was about raising awareness,” says Sylvie Haurat. “And we wanted it to be a message that would appeal to everyone.” 

The Strategy
The agency team’s initial discussions focused on different ways to present the death penalty as outdated and irrelevant – building on insight into the varied and often conflicting ways in which it is used in different countries, and the fact that there is little evidence to suggest capital punishment effectively dissuades others from repeating the same crime. The creative team were concerned that imagery such as an electric chair overgrown by nature might lack impact, however. Attention then turned to Amnesty International’s logo, which features the image of a candle signifying hope out of darkness. Their idea was to use figures of executioners made of wax melting.

“The thought of using wax figures came to us quite quickly because the Amnesty International logo stands for light and hope, and because the melting wax would simply show the time was right to make the death penalty simply melt away,” says TBWA-Paris Art Director Philippe Taroux. “We felt this was a positive way to get the message across – with only a final push in the campaign needed to bring it to its end, it was important to be engaging rather than shocking which people might have felt was alienating.”

Though the creative solution was found early executing it would take almost another 18 months, however. “If you don’t have the money to spend you need time,” Taroux adds. “We began by researching how we could film melting, life-size figures for TV. We approached production collective Pleix who we have worked with many times before to see if we could build and film the figures for real then melt them in post-production. But then we realised how difficult it would be to shoot what we wanted for real.”

Early tests showed it would be too difficult to film melting wax without it looking like stop-motion animation. The logistics involved combined with the limited budget available, meanwhile, meant a more cost effective way to do it was needed that look as realistic as shooting it for real.

“We then began working with post-production company Digital District to find a way to create figures using CG that looked life-size and realistic that we could then melt convincingly,” Taroux continues. “It was really hard as nothing like this had been done before and only in the last week could we be sure what we had was good enough. We ended up pushing the software to the limit on what turned out to be one of the most complicated ads I’ve ever done.” 

So, the figures were sculpted in CG then melted using special software. Facial scans were also used to create extra details on the faces. An important balancing act, however, was ensuring that while realistic the figures did not too closely resemble any particular nationality, Brunner points out: “While we wanted the executioners to be realistic they couldn’t look too like one nationality.” 

Creating the texture of the wax was relatively easy compared to simulating realistic melting. CG software is highly effective for quick water splashes but less suitable for melting more viscous substances very slowly. “Everything had to be really precise – which is always the case to get the best out of 3D,” Taroux adds.  “We drew lot of storyboards to know exactly what we wanted in each shot working closely with the director. We then focused closely on the special effects. Editing was about making sure each of the four ‘stories’ had equal weight.” 

Music choice was another important consideration. “The images were critical, but as important was creating the right ‘climate’ through the sound to provide an emotional dimension,” Taroux explains. The track eventually chosen after months of research was a stirring piece of music called ‘Everyday’ by Carly Comando. “We did not want anything that would over-dramatise the subject. The music was chose had to keep the human dimension – to be stirring and hopeful.”  

Amnesty International France was closely involved throughout the extended development and production process.

“This meant a number of lengthy discussions among our executive committee – about the storyboards, for example,” says Sylvie Haurat. “Because one scene they suggested would show an executioner’s face melting. We had lots of discussions about the ethics of whether Amnesty International could be seen to melt an executioner. This might seem bizarre to an outsider but as I say, we are very demanding. But the idea was strong. And the scene with the melting face is still there.”  

The finished film featured four different vignettes, each depicting a different form of execution: beheading by sword, a practice still used in some Middle East countries; firing squad, still used in China; hanging, used in parts of Asia; and electrocution, practise still used in parts of the US. Each vignette was carefully lit and shot against a simple black background with the audience’s viewpoint guided around the different figures and their equipment as the wax models began to melt.

Though the commercial took almost 18 months to produce the client was closely involved throughout the project. “We have a close relationship and so a strong degree of trust,” says Brunner. “There was much talking around the brief and first concepts as nothing had been done like this before. Then there was more talking around the realisation. Ultimately, however, it all turned out well and no modifications by the client to any of our work at all were made.”

The Impact
Amnesty International France’s ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ campaign launched on October 10 2010, the fourth European Day Against the Death Penalty.  With an extremely limited budget, the campaign needed unpaid media coverage to extend its reach. So ahead of launch, the agency produced CDs and press releases about the campaign to distribute to the media along with scaled down wax models of an electric chair. This generated editorial coverage on four major TV shows and in numerous magazines. The commercial was then shown in French independent cinemas over the next four months.

The ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ film went on to have a significant and far-reaching impact. It generated a large amount of interest at home and abroad and, in the months that followed, the French-produced advertising was used by Amnesty International sections in more than a dozen other countries – a highly unusual move for an organisation where individual markets usually produce and use they own campaign materials, locally.

In the months since, the campaign has won more than two dozen advertising industry awards including a D&AD Yellow Pencil in the Animation category in 2011.

“The campaign’s success is down to the emotional power of the subject and the way it was presented which touched people without over-dramatising,” Brunner believes. “The film is positive and motivating. The technology behind it makes it look real. And the use of wax makes a direct link to the Amnesty candle. It is a perfect combination of pictures, music and message.” 

Sylvie Haurat adds: “The strength of the campaign lay in the quality of the creative concept and its symbolic resonance. The length of time it took to make did cause us problems – we had hoped to run the campaign in October 2009 but it wasn’t ready until a year later. But pro bono work is never straight forward. And we were amazed that support for the work among Amnesty International activists was unanimous – which for us is extremely rare.” 

Advertising Agency: TBWA/Paris
Executive Creative Directors: Eric Holden, Rémi Noël
Copy Writer: Benoît Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Director: Pleix
Production Company: Warm & Fuzzy
Composting: Philippe Aubry, Dan Elhadad, Jimmy Cavé, Guillaume Nadaud, Guillaume Martin
Music: Artist/Song Title: Carly Comando – Everyday


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