The Clowns – BETC Paris for Canal+

CANAL PLUS_1.25.1

On the 21st of September CANAL+ launches a new channel, fully dedicated to series, which will be automatically included in the subscription.

The campaign, created by BETC Paris, is a tribute to series and their addictiveness – once you start watching you’re dying to see what happens next… This idea was the starting point for the creative team, the same one as behind The Closet and The Bear. The film was shot in Vancouver during the summer. It was directed by Steve Rogers through Wanda and is followed by an outdoor campaign all over France.

CANAL PLUS_1.24.1

CANAL PLUS_1.7.1

“The idea was to make an intriguing film that creates suspense – you can’t wait to find out how it ends. Just like when you watch a good series.
This was one of the reasons we chose dwarf clowns; in great series there’s often something a bit odd about the unusual characters that makes you become attached to them (a cop serial killer, a depressed Mafioso, a family of undertakers…). – Stéphane Xiberras, CCO and President BETC Paris.

Advertising Agency: BETC Paris
EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Stephane Xiberras COPYWRITER : Jean-Christophe Royer
ART DIRECTOR: Eric Astorgue
ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR: Damien Binello
STRATEGIC PLANNING: Clarisse Lacarrau, Vianney Vaute TRAFIC : Coralie Chasset
PRODUCTION COMPANY: Wanda
DIRECTOR: Steve Rogers


Grey New York for Canon Eos – What would you do to get the perfect shot?

The world is filled with beautiful moments worth capturing. You just have to see them. Also, buy a Canon Rebel T4i camera and carry it with you all the time. That way, whenever inspiration strikes, you’ll be ready to snap a photo you can save forever. Also, Canon will sell more Canon Rebels.

“Inspired” is a new ad for the brand from Grey in New York features a montage of adventurous photographers braving environmental hazards to get that special shot. The spot does a particularly nice job of portraying the product users as the heroes of the story: their antics are by varying degrees entertaining (trying to outrun a charging giraffe, staring down an irate fishmonger) and stupid-dangerous (climbing to the edge of an icy roof to get a better angle on the kid making snow angels in an empty pool). The resulting pictures are all marvelous, and so is the filming of the spot itself, showing all the right attention to detail—e.g., the birthday girl’s sideway glance when her mom nonchalantly sweeps a bowl off the table to get it out of the frame.

The director, Nicolai Fuglsig, also shot Fallon’s Balls spot. He appears to have an affinity for steep roads and the effects of gravity on unusual objects—in that case innumerable bouncy balls, and in this case a flaming tire. The soundtrack is Rachel Fannan of the California rock group Only You singing a charmingly understated version of the easily mawkish classic “Beautiful Dreamer,” and it’s pretty much perfect for the spot. Canon or someone should probably post or sell the whole song somewhere obvious soon. People are going to want to hear it.

Figuring out how exactly the lofty tagline, “Long live imagination,” ties into an ad about making concrete records of inspiring moments may take a few steps of abstraction. But in the end, it does make sense, and the conceit, with all its overtones of creativity and immortality, is pretty much dead-on for an ad aimed at people who want to be artists.
Advertising Agency: Grey, New York
Chief Creative Officer: Tor Myhren
Executive Creative Directors: Ari Halper, Steve Krauss
Creative Directors: Stu Mair, Dave Cuccinello
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Nicolai Fuglsig
Year: 2012


Levi’s 501 – The story behind Launderette

The opening bars of Marvin Gaye’s hit I Heard It Through The Grapevine are among the most evocative in television advertising history. For a whole generation, at least, those first few moody seconds only bring one image to mind – that of model Nick Kamen walking into a launderette. The ad might not have been set in the eighties (more likely a mythical fifties), but for many those first few seconds can evoke memories of an entire decade. But Nick Kamen (who only got the part on condition he lost weight) wasn’t the first to get his kit off in a launderette. An early Hamlet ad showed a bowler-hatted, be-suited gent undressing in front of a group of women and sticking his clothes, and even his hat, in a washing machine. Sadly, no one remembers the actor’s name. And, as far as we know, he never had a hit single written for him by Madonna…

Kamen’s “Lauderette” was shown for the first time on Boxing Day 1985. Thought up by John Hegarty and Barbara Noakes of BBH, the ad campaign was designed to try and save Levi’s flagging fortunes; the company was under attack from all sorts of other fashionable brands. In short, Levi’s (which had been going since the 1850s) were becoming the sort of jeans worn by people’s dads. And not even trendy dads – it was middle-aged “fuddy duddies” wearing “polyester Levi’s Action Slacks”. Research showed that the intended target audience for Levi’s 501 (15 to 19 year olds) saw the United States of the fifties and sixties as cool time and place in history: James Dean, Elvis Presley and Sam Cooke all belonged to this mythical, wondrous world. Unless the ad agencies came up with something new, the alternative was going with the American campaign for 501, which was all about how well the jeans fitted in the United States of Ronald Reagan. The image seemed the opposite of MTV and European chic.

So, director Roger Lyons was given the go-ahead to film an ad that showed drop dead gorgeous model Nick Kamen stripping down to his boxer shorts, while flustered women and bemused elders looked on, and then sitting and waiting while his jeans were in the wash. All this and Marvin Gaye thrown in too. (Except it wasn’t actually Marvin Gaye but a newly recorded “session” version of the song, though the original was later re-released off the back of the ad and entered the charts all over again…). “Grapevine” was the first of four Levi’s-related songs to all make the Top Ten, a feat that made advertisers realise that choosing the right music was of paramount importance because it really could help push a product on TV. They call it “Integrated Marketing”, and it meant a single in the chart and an ad on the box simultaneously, as well as the 501 logo alongside the artist’s name on the record sleeve in every record shop in Britain and USA.

Kate Thornton, a famous English journalist, was a schoolgirl at the time and remembers the effect that Kamen’s striptease had on her: “I remember that the ad was running at a cinema before a movie, and I hadn’t seen it on the tely at that point. So I went to the cinema just to see the ad…” she says. “The commercial made those jeans sexy at a time when Levi’s were struggling to make their product appealing to women of my age, and really that’s where the big spenders come from. Suddenly those jeans became a must-heve item! I only wanted them because Nick Kamen wore them and took them off…”

Thornton wasn’t the only teenager to feel that away. Consumers wrote in to Levi’s in their thousands asking for picture of Kamen. Meanwhile, sales of 501 shot up by an incredible 800% in the wake of the ad, which eventually had to be taken off the air because the Company couldn’t produce enough jeans to meet the new demand… By 1987 sales of Levi’s jeans were reported to be 20 times what they had been just three years earlier. The commercial also boosted sales of boxer shorts to a record high, though the ad agency only put Kamen in a pair of boxers because they weren’t allowed to show their hero in a pair of jockeys. And it wasn’t just teenage girl buying the jeans: boys were impressed by what Kamen could do. “The ad said: wear Levi’s jeans and you’ll be a rebel without a cause!” says psychologist Dr David Lewis. “You’ll be able to alienate older people (who young people despite anyway) and you can be cool…”

Inevitably, Nick Kamen was suddenly flavour of the month. Madonna wrote a song for him called “Each Time You Break My Heart” which made it into Top Ten. Kamen was soon a fully-fledged pop star, but his new career was short lived. Subsequent singles failed and Kamen moved to Los Angeles where he was to live for a time with British television presenter  Amanda de Cadenet. “There wasn’t life for Nick Kamen after Levi’s because he broke the rule…he talked!” says Thornton. “We just liked looking at him. It was as simple as that. He was a model and he just had these smouldering beautiful looks… but fundamentally he was to be looked at and lusted over, and never to be taken seriously…”. Nick Kamen turned a new Levi’s ad into a much-hyped media event and ended up eventually being replaced in 1999 by a fluffy yellow pupped called Flat Eric…

(Mark Robinson, The Sunday Times)

Advertising Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty 
Creative: John Hegarty, Greg Mills, Barbara Nokes
Director: Roger Lyons
Production: Mike Dufficy & Partners
Director of Photography: Richard Greatrex
Editor: Ian Weil
Music: Karl Jenkins, Mike Ratledge
Year: 1985


Cadbury and the Joy of Content – The story of Glass and a Half Full Productions

By 2007 Cadbury Dairy Milk (CDM) was running out of steam; facing flatlining sales, losing relevance to younger generations and with an advertising model that felt tired. The solution was to create Glass and a Half Full Productions, a content-led campaign including ‘Gorilla’, ‘Eyebrows’ and ‘Trucks’. The new direction moved CDM from being a manufacturer of chocolate to a producer of joy. It also created a debate around whether creating ‘joyful’ content rather than ‘persuasive’ advertising featuring chocolate actually works or not. The whole campaign delivered a master brand payback 171% greater than previous campaigns, with ‘Gorilla’ alone delivering an incremental revenue return of £4.88 for every £1 spent.

This case is a great example of an incredibly powerful and effective campaign in the face of a tricky market that is seasonal and unhealthy. Cadbury successfully cut through media criticism with brave but fantastic creative work that captured the public’s imagination.

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Gorilla (2007)

In 2007, Cadbury launched a new advertising campaign entitled Gorilla, from a new in-house production company called “Glass And A Half Full Productions”. The advert was premièred during the season finale of Big Brother 2007, and consists of a gorilla at a drum kit, drumming along to the Phil Collins song “In the Air Tonight”. The creative idea for the campaign is founded upon the notion that all communications should be as effortlessly enjoyable as eating the bar itself. For ‘Glass and a Half Full Productions’ is a production house that exists solely to create content that makes you feel as if you’ve just eaten a bar of Cadbury Dairy Milk. A production house that makes things that make you smile. The advert has now become extremely popular with over five million views on YouTube, and put the Phil Collins hit back into the UK charts.

“I don’t know what this has to do with Cadbury Dairy Milk, but it’s funny. Among gorilla drummers, it seems the work of Phil Collins inspires a genuine cosmic connection” Tim Nudd, ADWEEK, August 31 2007

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Richard Flintham/Juan Cabral
Director: Juan Cabral
Production Company: Blink
Producer: Matthew Fone
DoP: Dan Bronks
Editor: Joe Guest at Final Cut

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Trucks (2008)

On 28 March 2008, the second Dairy Milk advert produced by Glass and a Half Full Productions aired. The ad, entitled ‘Trucks’ features several trucks at night on an empty runway at a airport racing to the tune of Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now.

Like  “Gorilla”, Trucks is based on an offbeat concept set to a 1970s/80s rock soundtrack. It features a midnight drag race down an airport runway, using a range of vehicles including baggage transporters and motorised stairs. Trucks again highlights the skill of director Juan Cabral. It is beautifully choreographed and lit, with glossy production values and an energy that perfectly matches the music. It has a Top-Gear-meets-Wacky-Races appeal that will stand up to repeated viewings. It makes you wonder whether this is what’s going on behind the scenes at Terminal 5 – the baggage handling certainly leaves something to be desired.

According to Fallon, it took three weeks to “pimp” the trucks, the heaviest of which, the blue truck, weighed in at 25 tons. Shots of a tiny “underdog” battling against the giant provide human interest. The six-night shoot at an airport in Mexico involved 140 crew, two 35mm film cameras, two high-definition cameras and one crash-cam.

“We could have created Gorilla 2 and had him playing a trumpet,” the Cadbury marketing director, Philip Rumbol, told last Monday’s MediaGuardian section. “But that would have been too linear. It has to have a slightly enigmatic quality.”

“Trucks” therefore has a lot to live up to. It has a quirky charm, but is unlikely to change perceptions of the brand in the same way that its predecessor did. Gorilla became the ad phenomenon of last year – it was voted the public’s favourite TV ad of last year and won TV commercial of the year at the British Television Advertising Awards. It has also been credited with turning Cadbury’s fortunes around, helping the chocolate maker reverse the damage done by a 2006 salmonella scare and boost its UK market share last year. The Cadbury chief executive, Todd Stitzer, hailed 2007 as “the year of the gorilla”.

Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now was reportedly chosen for “Trucks” from a final shortlist consisting of Bon Jovi’s Living on a Prayer and Europe’s The Final Countdown. Picking the follow-up to a major hit is a notoriously tricky business. Whether Cadbury has got it right this time is open to debate, but at least it avoided the obvious “Gorilla 2″ route.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Juan Cabral
Director: Juan Cabral
Production Company: Blink
Producer: Matthew Fone
DoP: Dan Bronks
Editor: Joe Guest at Final Cut

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Gorilla & Trucks – Official Remix (2008)


On 5 September 2008, the Gorilla advert was relaunched with a new soundtrack – Bonnie Tyler’s Total Eclipse of the Heart – a reference to online mash-up of the commercial. Similarly, a version of the Truck advert appeared, using Bon Jovi’s song Livin’ on a Prayer. Both remakes premiered once again during the finale of Big Brother 2008.

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Eyebrows (2009)

In January 2009, ‘Eyebrows’, the third advert in the series, was released, of two children moving their eyebrows up and down rapidly to a set electro-funk beat: “Don’t Stop the Rock” by Freestyle.

The idea: Taking that moment of joy when you seize the opportunity to get away with your own little stunt, like making a funny face as your family portrait is being taken.The ad, by agency Fallon, opens with a brother and sister – wearing a dress in the trademark Cadbury purple – sitting for what appears to be a standard school photograph session. However, when the photographer leaves the shot the boy starts an electro tune, Don’t Stop the Rock by Freestyle, on his watch.

“Over at Glass and a Half Full Productions we noticed the wriggly potential of eyebrows and thought we would have a bit of fun with them,” said the Cadbury marketing director, Phil Rumbol. “Like the other productions ‘Eyebrows’ is all about losing yourself and embracing that moment of joy … after all, everybody remembers pulling a silly face or getting up to no good as a child when backs were turned.”

The one-minute film for Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate is thought to have been viewed more than four million times on YouTube and similar sites in its first three weeks. It is twice the number of viewings racked up at the same stage by the firm’s previous cult clip, in which a gorilla plays drums to Phil Collins’s In the Air Tonight. The eyebrows advert was first shown during the final of Celebrity Big Brother on Channel 4 and is still shown on television but its online success has been boosted by various links including one from the blog of American rapper and producer Kanye West and another from celebrity gossip blogger Perez Hilton. Cadbury’s has since struck a deal with Orange to give away the soundtrack as a mobile phone ringtone, which was downloaded 125,000 times in the first 11 days.

Lee Rolston, director of marketing for Cadbury Dairy Milk, told The Observer: “Television and online are morphing almost daily. We tend to put our first ads in big things such as the Big Brother final or the X Factor, then it’s immediately online, which becomes a very fluid, organic process. People tend to interact with the films and make their own versions and their own music. We just let it go and see what people think of it.”

Chris Hassell, director of Ralph, digital design agency specialising in viral advertising, said: “I saw it online first, which is the way it works now. When someone says ‘Did you see that ad?’, the first thing you do is look it up on YouTube.”

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Richard Flintham, Chris Bovill, John Allison
Director: Tom Kuntz
Production Company: MZJ

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Dogs in Cars (2009)

Cadbury has launched the fourth A Glass and a Half Full Productions commercial, “Dogs”, featuring the music of the Blue Danube Waltz by Johann Strauss II. Dogs take turns riding in a purple Lamborghini Diablo on the Oran Park Raceway in Sydney, letting the air blow past them as they hang out the window. A Glass and A Half Full of Joy!

The fourth commercial in the Cadbury series, airing internationally, conceived by Fallon London and produced in Australia by sister Publicis shop Saatchi & Saatchi, Sydney. This spot is designed to make people smile by showing the joy when different breeds of dog enjoy the air rushing by when their heads are sticking out of an iconic Lamborghini Diablo as it races around Sydney’s Oran Park Raceway. (This spot was originally shot and aired in the UK, but because the sky was grey, the decision was made to re-shoot in OZ on a bright sunny day).

Advertising Agency: Fallon London/Saatchi & Saatchi Sydney
Creative Director: Steve Back
Production Company: Caravan @ The Feds
Director: Ben Lawrence

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Freida (2010)

In 2010 Cadbury has launched A Glass and a Half Full of Smoothness in New Zealand with tap dancing cows, doing the moves to Fred Astaire’s song, “Putting on the Ritz”. The ad screened for the first time this week during the first ad break of Desperate Housewives. The spot opens with a close up of a black and white cow’s face before heading into the slick little number. The ad finishes with the cow pushing aside mirrors and opening a purple curtain to finish with an ensemble act.. This is the first Cadbury spot in the series not conceived by Fallon, London.

The team took universally recognised ‘smooth character’, Fred Astaire, and gave his iconic dance routine the unique Cadbury touch to create another joy-filled Cadbury moment. One of the creatives told Campaign Brief: “Psyop (who did Coke Happiness Factory) are amazing to work with. We filmed two two dancers tied together to be the front and the back of the cow, then a real cow and matched all the movements in CG. It took 4 months!”
Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB, New Zealand

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Chocolate Charmer (2010)

In April 2010, a new advert aired, entitled Chocolate Charmer, containing a scientist mixing milk and chocolate to make a dairy milk bar to the tune of “The Only One I Know” by The Charlatans. This was subtly different to the others as it did not feature the ‘A Glass and a Half Full Production’ title card at the start. The 60-second TV spot takes viewers into the “magical” world of Cadbury Dairy Milk production where the chocolate charmer creates bars of milk chocolate. As the ad unfolds, the Charmer “conducts” towers of chocolate milk out of spinning glass bowls, orchestrated by levers and pulleys and his “magical powers” with chocolate.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Richard Flintham, Nils-Petter Lovgren, Filip Tyden, Dan Watt
Director: Henrik Hallgren
Production Company: The Moving Picture Company

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Ostrich (2010)

The spot continues Cadbury’s ‘Glass and a Half Full Productions’ concept, which began with Fallon’s Dairy Milk TV ad ‘Gorilla’ in the UK in 2007.

The TVC was created by Saatchi & Saatchi Johannesburg. Their Executive Creative Director, Adam Wittert, says, “The brief was to make people feel the same joy they experience when they eat Cadbury Dairy Milk, so we came up with the idea of an ostrich and an ostrich, being a bird, would find the ultimate joy in flying. So our ostrich goes sky diving.”

The ad begins with an ostrich walking purposefully through a stack of wooden crates. It then becomes apparent that he is in the cargo hold of an airplane; the cargo door gradually opens and the ostrich takes a leap into the air like a sky diver, with the song “I gotta be me” by Sammy Davis Jr coming to a crescendo. The ostrich gleefully flies through the sky into the sunset, before pulling the ripchord to his Cadbury-branded parachute at the last minute, with the strapline ‘A glass and a half full of joy’ appearing beneath.

Saatchi & Saatchi Johannesburg managing director, Grant Meldrum, said that the Johannesburg office worked closely with Saatchi & Saatchi Fallon in the UK: “This ensured that we produced a TV commercial that would have global appeal and, at the same time, underpinned the possibilities of achieving pure joy and remained true to the brand’s proposition.”

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Johannesburg
Creative: Adam Wittert, Keisha Meyerson, Bruce Murphy
Director: Peter Truckel
Production Company: Catapult Commercials

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Dancing Clothes (2011)

In April 2011, a new advert aired, known as ‘Charity Shop’ or ‘Dancing Clothes’, featuring dancing clothes at a charity shop to the tune of  We Don’t Have to Take Our Clothes Off  by Jermaine Stewart. This exposed the song to a new generation who downloaded the track and returned the song to the UK Top 40 so far reaching no. 29. This ad also marks the return of the Glass and a Half Full title card.

The ad, created by Fallon, features dancing clothes in an initially lifeless charity shop. Individual clothes fall from the rails, rise from the floor and burst from cupboards, and the charity shop is transformed into a dancing extravaganza. Julie Reynolds, marketing manager for Cadbury Dairy Milk, said: “For us Cadbury Dairy Milk is about creating moments of joy that make people smile. We believe this production is another great way of doing just that.”

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Augusto Sola, Sam Hibbard
Director: Megaforce
Production Company: Riff Raff Films

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Monks (2011)

Cadbury Dairy Milk Chocolate has a long heritage of giving joy. In this experience we highlight how people in a strict and disciplined environment break out and let loose when Cadbury’s drops in. It’s the equivalent of the drill sergeant cutting the troop a break, or a strict boarding school nun letting the bunking girls off. When our stern teacher is given the opportunity to teach his pupils a lesson, he shows them how to let loose. Pretty soon the whole class is laughing, dancing and thoroughly enjoying themselves as much as the people witnessing this moment of joy.

Filmed entirely on location in rural China, the commercial captures a surreal moment of pure joy in a Buddhist monastery. A temple gathering takes a new turn with the addition of purple helium-filled balloons, with the monks released to groove to the sounds of Flo Rida track “Low”, starting with the chorus line, “apple bottom jeans, boots with the fur”.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative: Augusto Sola, Sam Hibbard
Director: Megaforce
Production Company: Riff Raff Films


Tom and Jerry in advertising

Haier Widescreen

IAMS Pet Food

EnBW Energy


Filofax

Emmentaler

Apple

Bugs – Pest Control

Rodasol – Pest Control

Lucky Cat Club – No Profit

3M – Scotch-Brite

International Day of Peace

Parmalat

Ford Mondeo

Opel Corsa

Alpenliebe

Tara’s Milk

McDonald’s Happy Meal

Cartoon Network


Stihl (2002/2011) – The Garden of Creativity

Stihl Leaf Blower – BLOW

A man is blowing leaves off the footpath. He accidentally blows his son off his bicycle as he is riding past.
Advertising Agency: FCB Melbourne
Creative Director: Alastair Simpson
Copywriter: Justine Drape
Art Director: Scott Nowell
Year: 2002
Shortlist

Stihl Foliage Trimmer – DROWNING


Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Bertrand Suchet
Copywriter: Jean Gabrielle Causse
Art Director: Pierrette Diaz
Photographer: Nicolas Descottes
Year: 2004

Stihl Foliage Trimmer – PIZZA DELIVERY MAN/SALESMAN/EXPRESS SERVICE





Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris

Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Edouard Perarnaud
Art Director: Martin Darfeuille
Photographer: David Harriman
Year: 2005
Shortlist

Stihl High Powered Blower – DESERT/SNOW/VOLCANO




Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Edouard Perarnaud
Art Director: Martin Darfeuille
Photographer: Corbis
Year: 2005

Stihl Chainsaw – SABRE


Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Edouard Perarnaud
Art Director: Martin Darfeuille
Photographer: Jean Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2005

Stihl Cut-off Saw – EIFFEL TOWER


Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Cèline Landa
Art Director: Benjamin Marchal
Year: 2005
Shortlist

Stihl Garden Tool – LOST CHILD/CAST AWAY



Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Mathieu Elkaim
Art Director: Pierrette Diza
Photographer: Julia Fullertton Batten
Year: 2006

Stihl Chainsaw – BIRD/SNAKE/SLOTH




Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris
Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Frederic Sounillac
Art Director: Alexandre Veret
Year: 2006

Stihl Brushcutter – CLOTHESLINE/PING PONG/LETTERBOX


Advertising Agency: DDB, Paris

Creative Director: Alexandre Hervè/Sylvain Thirache
Copywriter: Olivier Apers
Art Director: Hugues Pinguet
Photographer: Klaud Fayol
Year: 2005
Bronze Lion for the campaign

Stihl Gardener Tools – MEMORIES CAMPAIGN





Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Olivier Camensuli
Art Director: Frederic Royer/Yves Sarhadian
Photographer: Arnaud Pyvka
Year: 2006

Stihl Trimmer Range – WOMAN/MAN/BOY

Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Olivier Dermaux
Art Director: Mathieu Vinciguerra
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion for the campaign

Stihl Chainsaw – DON’T SPEND YOUR LIFE AT WORK




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Creative Directors: Olivier Altman/Herve Plumet
Creatives: Mathieu Degryse,/Yves-Eric Deboey
Photographer: Marc Gouby

Stihl Chainsaw – KIDS/CAR



Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Patrice Lucet
Art Director: Charles Guillemant
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2007
Shortlist

Stihl Chainsaw – CHRISTMAS TREE


Advertising Agency: Cumminsnitro, Melbourne
Executive Creative Director: Sean Cummins
Creative Director: James Procter
Copywriter: Julie Polter
Art Director: Dave Lunnie
Photographer: Peter Roberts
Year: 2007
Shortlist

Stihl High Power Blowers – BLOWER



Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Herve Plumet
Copywriter: Morgan Sommet
Art Director: Geoffroy Gozez
Production Company: La Pac, Paris
Director: Herve Plumet
Photographer: Herve Plumet
Year: 2007

Stihl – GRASS ARMY


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Celine Lescure
Art Director: David Aryel
Photographer: Jacques Demarcillac
Year: 2007

Stihl Chainsaw – FIRE


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Patrice Lucet
Art Director: Charles Guillemant
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2007

Stihl Cut-Off Saw – PILLARS/COSTRUCTION/STAIRS




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: George Carreno/Benoit Blunberger
Photographer: Herve Plumet
Year: 2007

Stihl Hedge Trimmer – MAZE


Advertising Agency: Cumminsnitro, Melbourne
Executive Creative Director: Sean Cummins
Creative Director: James Procter
Copywriter: James Procter
Art Director: Dave Lunnie
Photographer: Stuart Crosset
Year: 2008
Shortlist

Stihl Edgers – BROWN DWARF/ORANGE DWARF



Headline: Get your garden back
Advertising Agency: DCS, Porto Alegre Brazil
Executive Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Régis Montagna
Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Régis Montagna
Copywriter: Claudia Tajes
Art Director: João Pedro Vargas
Photographer: Claudio Meneghetti
Year: 2008

Stihl Blower Garden Vacuum – THREE LITTLE PIGS


Advertising Agency: DCS, Porto Alegre Brazil
Executive Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Régis Montagna
Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Régis Montagna
Copywriter: Patrik Matzembacher
Art Director:Andre Pauletti
Year: 2008

Stihl Electric Range – MIXER/HAIRDRYER/HEDGE TRIMMER




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Herve Plumet
Copywriter: Martin Rocaboy
Art Director: Yves Sarhadian
Photographer: Yann Le Pape
Year: 2008

Stihl Tools – CHAINSAW/BLOWER/HEDGE TRIMMER/CLEARING SAW




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Olivier Dermaux
Art Director: Mathieu Vinciguerra
Photographer:Hervè Plumet
Year: 2008

Stihl Gardening Tools – ANVILS/BARBED WIDE FENCE/STONE TREES/WALL





Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Mathieu Degryse
Art Director: Yves Eric Deboey
Photographer: Marc Gouby
Year: 2008

Stihl High Pressure Hose – GRAFFITI


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Mathieu Degryse
Art Director: Yves Eric Deboey
Photographer: Marc Gouby
Year: 2008

Stihl Gardening Tools Guarantee – CHAINSAW/BLOWER/HEDGE TRIMMER/CLEARING SAW






Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Oliver Desmettre/Fabrice Delacourt
Art Director: Nicolas Delille
Photographer: Herve Plumet
Year: 2009
Shortlist

Stihl Chainsaw – BEQUEATHE

For more than 80 years, STIHL have forged a reputation for making outdoor power equipment that doesn’t give up. Their iconic Chainsaws are no exception. Bullet-proof engineering combined with expert servicing means you’ll only ever need one. To demonstrate the incredible lifespan of a STIHL Chainsaw, we portrayed what might happen if it out-lived its owner.
Advertising Agency: DDB New Zealand
Executive Creative Director: Toby Talbot
Copywriter: Simon Vicars
Art Director: James Tucker
Production Company: Robbers Dog Films, Auckland
Director: Adam Stevens
Year: 2009

Stihl Gardening Tools – CARPET/BATH TUB/DISH WASHER/DRY CLEANER’S





Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Thierry Lebec
Art Director: Benedicte Potel
Photographer: Geof Kern
Year: 2009

Stihl Gardening Tools – STRONG


Advertising Agency: DCS, Porto Alegre Brazil
Executive Creative Director: Roberto Callage/Raphael Boher
Copywriter: Everton Behenck
Art Director:Rodrigo Alves
Photographer: Raul Krebs
Year: 2009

Stihl Power Cutters – SHUTTLE


Advertising Agency: FHV BBDO, Amsterdam
Executive Creative Director: Marthen Van De Vijfeijken
Art Director: Bart Bus
Photographer: Jeroen Bijl
Year: 2009

Stihl Gardening Tools – CAR/CHEMISTRY/SHOPPING/BABIES





Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Olivier Camensuli
Art Director: Federic Royer/Yves Sarhadian
Photographer: Herve Plumet
Year: 2009

Stihl Chainsaw – BEDOUIN


Headline: It makes you to saw
Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Charles Guillemant
Art Director: Faustin Claverie
Photographer: Jean-Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2010

Stihl – AUTUMN CALENDAR




Insights, Strategy & the Idea
STIHL asked the agency to develop a calendar, which promotes the product range of leaf blowers. The aim was to retain existing and entice new customers.
We didn’t want to create an ordinary calendar covering 365 days. So, we created the first autumn calendar – with a simple but striking idea: the sheets of the calendar fall automatically. Just like the leaves of trees in autumn. This brings autumn right into the offices of potential customers, showing the necessity of STIHL leaf blowers in an entertaining way – day by day.
Creative Execution
In close cooperation with a graduate engineer, we developed something never seen before: the first tear-off calendar that tears off its leaves automatically – introducing the STIHL autumn calendar.
The design remains close to the leaf. Every leaf-like sheet of the calendar has branching veins and is coloured like autumn foliage of the domestic tree world. Because leaves fall in autumn, the STIHL autumn calendar only covers the time period from October 23 to December 21.
Results and Effectiveness
After the first 100 STIHL autumn calendars arrived, STIHL got innumerable requests from key clients. Due to that, STIHL Germany is planning to produce a second batch of 3,500 calendars. And even STIHL International is planning to produce 1,000 pieces. Nevertheless, only six days after the demo-video of the STIHL autumn calendar has shown up on youtube.com, it got well over 160,000 hits, thousands of links to homepages, blogs and tweets.

Advertising Agency: Euro RSCG, Duesseldorf
Creative Directors: Torsten Pollmann/Felix Glauner
Art Directors: Martin Staubach/Kai Tusar/Marie Pielmeier
Copywriters: Christoph Mueller/Till Koester
Year: 2010
Shortlist

Stihl – STOP BOTHERING YOUR NEIGHBOURG CAMPAIGN




Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Creative Director: Hervè Plumet
Copywriter: Olivier Dermaux
Art Director: Mathieu Vinciguerra
Photographer: David Harriman
Year: 2010

Stihl Blower – BIRDS


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Executive Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Patrice Lucet
Art Director: Philippe Boucheron
Photographer: Leo Caillard
Year: 2011
Shortlist

Stihl Chainsaw – WARRIORS




Advertising Agency: Scholz & Friends, Berlin
Executive Creative Director: Matthias Spaetgens
Copywriter: Felix John
Art Director: PhilippeWeber
Year: 2011
Bronze Lion for the campaign

Stihl Box – THE GARDENER


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Chief Creative Officer: Olivier Altmann
Copywriter: Fabrice Dubois
Art Director: Gérald Schmitte
Production Company: Carnibirds
Director: David Gray
Year: 2011

Stihl – HAPPY CHRISTMAS


Advertising Agency: Publicis Conseil, Paris
Creative Director: Olivier Altmann
Art Director: Martin Darfeuille
Copywriter: Alexandre Hildebrand
Photographer: Jean Yves Lemoigne
Year: 2011


Nokia N96 Bruce Lee Limited Edition – Game of Death

2008 marked the 35th anniversary of Bruce Lee’s death. As a tribute, Nokia launched a Nokia N96 Bruce Lee Limited Edition. This is the story of how a China-only campaign started a wildfire on the net globally, selling product and giving the Nokia brand a serious hit of cool in the process.
Creative Idea: Bring Bruce Lee back to life.



Describe the objective of the promotion
1. Create buzz around the launch of the Nokia N96 by launching a promotional limited edition.
2. Create a burning desire for the N96 Bruce Lee Limited Edition beyond rational reasoning to part with a price equivalent of 5 month’s salary in China.
The Nokia N96 Bruce Lee Limited Edition came complete with a laser-engraved back cover featuring Bruce Lee’s face, an ENTERBAY Bruce Lee Game of Death collectable figurine, nunchaku dongle, limited edition poster and special embedded content (ringtone, images, etc).
Describe how the promotion developed from concept to implementation
The Nokia N96 is a ‘powerful’ internet and multimedia device, including the ability to watch movies. Bruce Lee is a cult hero admired for his mastery of the ‘powerful’ martial art, Kung Fu. 2008 was when the N96, Nokia’s flagship at the time, launched and the 35th anniversary of Bruce Lee’s death. We saw a tactical promotional opportunity to launch a limited edition N96 to create buzz around the N96 and a cool factor for the Nokia brand.
Our communication idea was to capture Bruce Lee fans’ imaginations by bringing their legend back to life.
Describe the success of the promotion with both client and consumer including some quantifiable results
What started as a China-only promotion spread the globe like wildfire. It’s a breakthrough at Nokia and sits proudly atop Nokia’s marketing activation excellence hall of fame.
Results:
– 16+ million views globally exceeding target by 16x
– 1.2+ million unique visitors to campaign site v target of 10,000
– Click-through rate of 7.5% v target 1%
– 10,000s of comments, links, forwards…
– All online stock ordered in LESS THAN 5 DAYS
– Estimated value in ‘earned media’ more than US$3 million (multiplying cost of buying a 90sec spot by views using ad rates of sites YouTube, Youku, etc.
Explain why the method of promotion was most relevant to the product
Our Chinese tech and style leading audience lives most of their life online and are heavy users of social networking sites. Being leaders, they reject mass preferring instead to be the first to discover and the social kudos that brings. Viral, an internet ‘dialect’, was the perfect way to reach them in their language and excite them enough to get them to the campaign site where they could explore more and place an order. Retail theatre was used to capture imaginations in-store.


Advertising Agency: JWT Beijing
Creative Director: Shankun Sun
Copywriter: Wei Huang
Art Director: Denchun Qiu
Production Company: JQK Productions
Director: Jinjing Zhu


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