Levi’s 501 – The story behind Launderette

The opening bars of Marvin Gaye’s hit I Heard It Through The Grapevine are among the most evocative in television advertising history. For a whole generation, at least, those first few moody seconds only bring one image to mind – that of model Nick Kamen walking into a launderette. The ad might not have been set in the eighties (more likely a mythical fifties), but for many those first few seconds can evoke memories of an entire decade. But Nick Kamen (who only got the part on condition he lost weight) wasn’t the first to get his kit off in a launderette. An early Hamlet ad showed a bowler-hatted, be-suited gent undressing in front of a group of women and sticking his clothes, and even his hat, in a washing machine. Sadly, no one remembers the actor’s name. And, as far as we know, he never had a hit single written for him by Madonna…

Kamen’s “Lauderette” was shown for the first time on Boxing Day 1985. Thought up by John Hegarty and Barbara Noakes of BBH, the ad campaign was designed to try and save Levi’s flagging fortunes; the company was under attack from all sorts of other fashionable brands. In short, Levi’s (which had been going since the 1850s) were becoming the sort of jeans worn by people’s dads. And not even trendy dads – it was middle-aged “fuddy duddies” wearing “polyester Levi’s Action Slacks”. Research showed that the intended target audience for Levi’s 501 (15 to 19 year olds) saw the United States of the fifties and sixties as cool time and place in history: James Dean, Elvis Presley and Sam Cooke all belonged to this mythical, wondrous world. Unless the ad agencies came up with something new, the alternative was going with the American campaign for 501, which was all about how well the jeans fitted in the United States of Ronald Reagan. The image seemed the opposite of MTV and European chic.

So, director Roger Lyons was given the go-ahead to film an ad that showed drop dead gorgeous model Nick Kamen stripping down to his boxer shorts, while flustered women and bemused elders looked on, and then sitting and waiting while his jeans were in the wash. All this and Marvin Gaye thrown in too. (Except it wasn’t actually Marvin Gaye but a newly recorded “session” version of the song, though the original was later re-released off the back of the ad and entered the charts all over again…). “Grapevine” was the first of four Levi’s-related songs to all make the Top Ten, a feat that made advertisers realise that choosing the right music was of paramount importance because it really could help push a product on TV. They call it “Integrated Marketing”, and it meant a single in the chart and an ad on the box simultaneously, as well as the 501 logo alongside the artist’s name on the record sleeve in every record shop in Britain and USA.

Kate Thornton, a famous English journalist, was a schoolgirl at the time and remembers the effect that Kamen’s striptease had on her: “I remember that the ad was running at a cinema before a movie, and I hadn’t seen it on the tely at that point. So I went to the cinema just to see the ad…” she says. “The commercial made those jeans sexy at a time when Levi’s were struggling to make their product appealing to women of my age, and really that’s where the big spenders come from. Suddenly those jeans became a must-heve item! I only wanted them because Nick Kamen wore them and took them off…”

Thornton wasn’t the only teenager to feel that away. Consumers wrote in to Levi’s in their thousands asking for picture of Kamen. Meanwhile, sales of 501 shot up by an incredible 800% in the wake of the ad, which eventually had to be taken off the air because the Company couldn’t produce enough jeans to meet the new demand… By 1987 sales of Levi’s jeans were reported to be 20 times what they had been just three years earlier. The commercial also boosted sales of boxer shorts to a record high, though the ad agency only put Kamen in a pair of boxers because they weren’t allowed to show their hero in a pair of jockeys. And it wasn’t just teenage girl buying the jeans: boys were impressed by what Kamen could do. “The ad said: wear Levi’s jeans and you’ll be a rebel without a cause!” says psychologist Dr David Lewis. “You’ll be able to alienate older people (who young people despite anyway) and you can be cool…”

Inevitably, Nick Kamen was suddenly flavour of the month. Madonna wrote a song for him called “Each Time You Break My Heart” which made it into Top Ten. Kamen was soon a fully-fledged pop star, but his new career was short lived. Subsequent singles failed and Kamen moved to Los Angeles where he was to live for a time with British television presenter  Amanda de Cadenet. “There wasn’t life for Nick Kamen after Levi’s because he broke the rule…he talked!” says Thornton. “We just liked looking at him. It was as simple as that. He was a model and he just had these smouldering beautiful looks… but fundamentally he was to be looked at and lusted over, and never to be taken seriously…”. Nick Kamen turned a new Levi’s ad into a much-hyped media event and ended up eventually being replaced in 1999 by a fluffy yellow pupped called Flat Eric…

(Mark Robinson, The Sunday Times)

Advertising Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty 
Creative: John Hegarty, Greg Mills, Barbara Nokes
Director: Roger Lyons
Production: Mike Dufficy & Partners
Director of Photography: Richard Greatrex
Editor: Ian Weil
Music: Karl Jenkins, Mike Ratledge
Year: 1985


Songvertising – 32 best commercials with singing people

1 – YEO VALLEY ORGANIC – Boyband

In a follow-up to last year’s rapping farmers ad, Yeo Valley launched a tv spot during the first ad break of The X Factor live show. The one-off, two-minute music video features a farming-inspired boy band called The Churned, singing a ballad entitled Forever. The ad was shot on location in Blagdon, in the heart of rural Somerset. The launch tied in with a Facebook karaoke competition, where users could sing along to the Yeo Valley track. The winner appeared in a 30-second version of the ad, which ran during the X Factor final on 11 December.

Advertising Agency: BBH London
Year: 2012
Shortlist

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

2 – CARLTON DRAUGHT – Big Ad

An epic send-up of big budget ads, featuring a cast of thousands. Song lyrics: “It’s a big ad / very big ad/ it’s a big ad we’re in./ It’s a big ad/ my God it’s big/ can’t believe how big it is/ it’s a big ad for Carlton Draught / It’s just so freaking huge! / It’s a big ad/ expensive ad! / This ad better sell some bloooooody beer!!!

Advertising Agency: George Patterson Y&R, Melbourne
Year: 2006
Gold Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

3 – PUMA – Hardchorus

We open on a small group of hardcore soccer fans, also known as hooligans, standing in a classic British pub. Suddenly, one of them starts singing the first words of “Truly, Madly, Deeply” by Savage Garden. Another hooligan joins in, and as the camera pulls out, we see that the whole pub is packed with hooligans. They all sing together with the power of an entire stadium of fans during a soccer game, turning the cheesy love song into something big, beautiful and romantic. After the last chorus, a super appears: “It’s match day. It’s Valentine’s Day. Let your better half know how you feel. Dedicate and send this song at pumahardchorus.com”. Followed by Puma’s “Love = football” next to the Puma logo.

Advertising Agency: Droga5
Year: 2010
Gold Lion for the Campaign

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

4 – NORTE BEER – It’s Good to Have Friends

Beer means friendship, and this campaings presents in funny way the different kind of friends we all have.

Advertising Agency: Del Campo/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi, Buenos Aires
Year: 2009
Silver Lion for the Campaign

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

5 – T-MOBILE – Welcome Back

On October 27th 2010, thousands of unsuspecting passengers arriving at Heathrow’s Terminal 5 were given a welcome home to remember. People were greeted by a 300 strong choir and vocal orchestra singing a medley of songs, completely a cappella, to welcome them back into the country.

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Satchi,  London
Year: 2011
Silver Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

6 – COCA-COLA – Hilltop

Advertising Agency: McCann Erikson
Year: 1971

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

7 – HEINEKEN – Singer

A blues singer can’t sing the blues – his life is too contented. A sip of lager soon changes that. Heineken refreshes his blueness.

Advertising Agency: Lowe Haward- Spink,  UK
Year: 1992
Gold Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

8 – HONDA – Impossible Dream

A man travels on an incredible journey using some of Honda’s landmark products whilst miming to the Andy Williams song ‘The Impossible Dream’. His journey comes to an abrupt end when he leaps off a giant waterfall in a Honda Powerboat into the mist below. Surely, this is the end of his dream? However as Andy Williams reaches the crescendo of the song, our hero returns in a Honda Hot Air Balloon to finish off the song in style. Garrison Keillor – the voice of Honda – sums it all up with ‘I couldn’t have put it better myself’.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy,  London
Year: 2006
Gold Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

9 – COCA-COLA – Choir

Here’s Coca-Cola celebrating along with Santo its 125th year, and once again, we are guilty of naivety. We believe that, even today, the world is not far from the world that we dream of. In fact we are so naïve about thinking this way, that we decided to carry out an investigation to evaluate just how justified our reasons to believe in a better world were. We are proud to present to you “Choir”, created by Santo for Coca-Cola Latin America and their new communications platform: “REASONS TO BELIEVE IN A BETTER WORLD”.

Advertising Agency: Santo, Buenos Aires
Year: 2011
Silver Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

10 – T-MOBILE – Singalong

When T-Mobile invited the British public to be part of their next event, people turned up to Trafalgar Square, not knowing what they were letting themselves in for. Thousands of microphones were handed out as it was revealed they’d all be singing karaoke together. After a number of songs, and with a surprise guest appearance from Pink, the event culminated with everyone singing the timeless classic, ‘Hey Jude’

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Satchi,  London
Year: 2010
Shortlist

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 11 – NIKE FREE RUN – I Would Run to You

Love makes people do crazy things. Like run across the country. See how strong running reunites a long distance couple.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Year: 2012
Bronze Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 12 – NIKE – Pretty

As Maria Sharapova marches to her tennis match, she passes people who sing I Feel Pretty. She slams a ball cross to court, putting an end to the singing.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Year: 2007
Gold Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

13 – BASF – Dear John

The ad, set in army camp, features a soldier receiving a letter which goes to the tune of “Dear John”, the country song written by Lewis Talley, Fuzzy Owen and Billy Barton and made popular by Jean Shepard during the Korean war. As the song finishes the sergeant adapts the classic line from Humphrey Bogart, “Play it again John”.

Advertising Agency: Colenso BBDO, NZ
Year: 1982
Gold Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

14 – REXONA – Sensitive Armpits

A tough lumberjack is chopping down a tree. As he rearranges his cap, we notice at the same time he does that his underarm begins to song a sweet song. The corny melody is really annoying him. At this point, we see different cliché images of rough and tough men all undergoing the same situation. Finally, one of them applies the New Rexona Men Sensitive and succeeds in shutting up the underarm voice. A male voice in off says: New Rexona Men Sensitive. Even the most insensitive guy can have sensitive underarms.

Advertising Agency: Ponce Buenos Aires
Year: 2011
Silver Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 15 – STARBUCKS – Glen

Glen jumpstarts his day by drinking a Starbucks DoubleShot. As he opens the can, Survivor appears in his apartment. They follow Glen through his full morning routine, singing a personalized version of “Eye of the Tiger.”

Advertising Agency: Fallon, New York
Year: 2004
Shortlist

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

16 – GOOGLE – Demo Slam: Realtime Karaoke

Google is more than just a search bar. However, most of us don’t use, let alone, are aware of its many features. We needed to find a way to share all this free technology with the world. To educate everyone about all of Google’s innovations; we decided to change the way people learnt about it. We got precisely the people who didn’t use this free tech, to explain to the others why they should. Because, only they would be able to explain it in a way that would be fun to watch, and understood by all. By bringing in just a little bit of courage, creativity and fun; each of them pushed the role of technology in our lives and inspired the rest to use it in ways never imagined before.
Transforming something few were aware of to something the whole world cared about; we were able to re-define the role of technology in everyone’s life. From celebrities, scientists, soccer moms, teens to even sports personalities; everyone came forward to find new ways in which technology could make their world a little better.

Advertising Agency: Johannes Leonardo, NY
Year: 2011
Gold Lion for the Campaign

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

17 – DISCOVERY CHANNEL – I Love the World

We developed a new brand idea for Discovery Channel: Discovery is the
World’s Biggest Fan of the World. We wanted to celebrate all that is epic, beautiful, inspiring, fun and just plain crazy in the world. Fellow fans—from spacewalking Astronauts to Alaskan fishermen to Zulu warriors to Stephen Hawking to Discovery hosts like Mike Rowe and Bear Grylls—sing along to an old campfire song re-written to express how each of them loves the world. In other words, to tell people why Discovery Channel thinks “The World is Just Awesome.”

Advertising Agency: 72ndSunny, USA
Year: 2008
Shortlist

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

18 – MATCH.COM – Piano

This is a film for the online dating service, Match.com, which features a couple finding each other as they examine musical instruments. He strums a guitar and she plays a keyboard. Together they make beautiful music, and it’s clearly the start of something special.

Advertising Agency: Mother, London
Year: 2010
Gold Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 19 – WILKINSON – Mow the Lawn

Girls in a front yard sing about mowing the lawn in order to promote Wilkinson/Schick Quattro razors for women.

Advertising Agency: JWT, New York
Year: 2009

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

20 – AMERICAN LEGACY FOUNDATION/TRUTH – Singing Cowboy

We saddled up a horse, found a modern day cowboy that happened to have a hole in his neck due to a tobacco-related laryngectomy, and sent him to Manhattan to sing.

Advertising Agency: Arnold/Crispin Porter + Bogusky, USA
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

21 – ARNET BROABAND – Numa Numa

The ad shows some of the funny stuff you can find on the Internet.

Advertising Agency: Santo, Buenos Aires
Year: 2007
Shortlist

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

22 – EVIAN – Voices

A man in a lift, a jogger, a secretary by the photocopier, a man in his car, an elderly lady…in all these scenes from everyday life, we see people singing with their childish voices.

Advertising Agency: BETC Euro RSCG, Paris
Year: 2003
Shortlist

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 23 – NIKE WOMEN – Surgery

A group of women run away from a plastic surgery clinic dancing a choreography to a reggaetón tune.

Advertising Agency: Madre, Buenos Aires
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 24 – DIESEL – Anthem

Sing-a -ong Diesel Island national anthem. Why is your country fucked up?

Advertising Agency: Santo, Buenos Aires
Year: 2011
Silver Lion for the Campaign

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 25 – PROCTER & GAMBLE – You’ll Never Walk Alone

This 60-second commercial shows a lifetime of moms by their children’s sides doing the daily, sometimes mundane, things that help their children grow up to be Olympians. All the while, they sing “You’ll Never Walk Alone” from the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical Carousel. The ad builds from a child’s birth and culminates with the Olympics and a proud mom seeing all her hard work pay off. We then cut to a card that says, “Thank you, Mom,” followed by a series of product brand images that ends on the P&G logo with the voice-over, “P&G. Proud sponsor of Moms.”

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Year: 2010
Bronze Lion for the Campaign

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

26 – BURGER KING – Americas Favorite/More Mayo/More Cheese

Introducing the Whopperettes.

The Whopperettes return with a story about extra cheese.

The Whopperettes return with a story about mayo.

Advertising Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky
Year: 2006
Silver Lion for the Campaign

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

 27 – CADBURY DAIRY MILK – Night Runner

Fallon and Cadbury keep Great Britain pumped for the Olympics with a new spot that re-creates “The Final Countdown” — but adds multiple voices singing from the towers and buildings while a runner makes his way, presumably, to the Olympic Gold. An accompanying interactive feature encourages Britons to upload videos of them singing similarly inspirational songs to help team GB to victory.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Year: 2012

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

28 – LOTTO LOTTERY – Ballroom Blitz

A taxi driver refuses to let passengers into his cab. Instead, he walks over to the queue and starts to sing for them. The man who joins in is chosen as the lucky passenger.

Advertising Agency: New Deal DDB, Norway
Year: 2001
Bronze Lion

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

29 – CADBURY DAIRY MILK – Simply the Best

Part of Cadbury’s “Keep Team GB Pumped” campaign for London 2012 Olympics, swimmer Rebecca Adlington is serenaded by royal guards, dinner ladies and butchers with Tina Turner’s “Simply the Best.”

Advertising Agency: Hypernaked, London
Year: 2012

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

30 – AMP ENERGY DRINK – Walk of no Shame

AMP wanted to introduce three new products with specific energy functions, designed to help our target, people who live their lives to the fullest. We also needed to increase brand awareness and embed ourselves into their daily life. We wanted to be the most relevant, unlike our hyper-masculine energy competitors. “Walk of No Shame” was an ode to the infamous walk that young people take “the night after” going out. With the look and sound of a mini-musical, AMP showed how one can take a “walk of no shame” as it gets you back on your feet.

Advertising Agency: BBDO New York
Year: 2009
Shortlist

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

31 – LABATT BLUE BEER – Big Song

A young man tries to make up to his girlfriend by singing her a song around a campfire – “Out of the Blue”, and it turns into a huge sing-a-long.

Advertising Agency: Ammirati Puris, Canada
Year: 2001

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

32 – PEPSI – Pepsi Generation

Advertising Agency: BBDO, USA
Year: 1984


Wieden + Hegarty – 30 years of Creative Chaos

What are the reasons behind a successful commercial – is it the craft, the execution or great story telling, and what has made campaigns stand out over decades? On the fifth day of the 59th International Festival of Creativity, Sir John Hegarty, worldwide creative director and Dan Wieden, co-founder and global executive creative director, Wieden+Kennedy (W+K) discussed the elements that make a campaign successful, while speaking on the topic, ’30 years of creative chaos’.

The session—celebrating the 30th anniversary of both Wieden + Kennedy and Bartle Bogle Hegarty—began with an amusing video in which Wieden, to compete with the knighted Hegarty, gets a handful of degrees and ordainments through the Internet so he can be introduced as Lord Rev. Dr. Dan Wieden. The comical mock one-upmanship continued throughout the talk—moderated by Atifa Silk of Campaign Asia-Pacific—as the two legendary creatives alternately praised and teased one another following the screening of each spot.

BBH.jpg

“I have enormous empathy for Dan’s work…,” Hegarty said. “I remember when I suddenly started seeing this work—Instant Karma—coming out of this American agency for Nike. I had to find out who they were. Where are they? Portland, Oregon? Where is Oregon?”

The session started by talking about Nike’s long term association with W+K, and how over the years the sports brand has worked with the agency, trusting and believing in its every work. To this, Wieden said, “Nike is a very different client as the company does not believe in airing one TVC several times. Interestingly, the company also does not believe in advertising, it believes in creating an experience. When I came to know about this, I enquired about this quite unique approach. The company representative replied, ‘You never write the same letter twice, then why the same spot?”

Agreeing with him, Sir Hegarty cited the example of the Nike commercial featuring golfer Tiger Woods. “Earl and Tiger” ad for Nike Golf, which aired in the wake of the golfer’s sex scandal. It shows a stoic Woods looking into the camera as his late father, heard in voiceover, urges him to reflect on his life. He said, “In order to break away from the usual and to create something unusual, a brand has to be constantly brave. A brave brand will be ready to take risks, and will further allow the agency to create unusual and interesting campaigns.”

Sir Hegarty next talked about the ‘Go forth’ TVC for Levis by W+K, called ‘America’s challenging time’. “There are times when due to the scale, it becomes difficult to use one language to unify different countries with different dialects. In such situations, one needs to conceptualise one single idea, which will bring everybody to a common platform,” he remarked.

Wieden, in turn, first became aware of Hegarty’s work with the Levi’s ad of  “a young man walking into a laundry room and taking off his clothes.” “You keep stumbling across opportunities, an idea reveals itself within an idea,” said Hegarty on the inspiration behind the ad. “In a Levi’s ad there’s always someone getting dressed or undressed.”

But, how the foundation client has overpowered the agency’s business?

According to Wieden, in case of W+K, Nike was the only visible client for a long time and while the agency had the business of a small radio station from Portland, the fact is that its survival was mainly dependent on one client; this made the agency uncomfortable. So, while foundation clients are important for any agency, there is also a need to branch out.

Next, speaking on the power of creativity, Sir Hegarty elaborated, “Advertising is 80 per cent idea and 20 per cent execution – and we live in a world of YouTube – where everyone can make everything, so it is important to be both perfect in detailing and in storytelling.”

Adding to his view point, Wieden said, “Emotions need to be depicted in the right form and it is not necessary that one always has to go the social media way to depict emotions. Rather, telling simple stories with great emotions can move the consumers.”

But sometimes ideas aren’t enough and it’s the execution that pulls the ad through, commented Hegarty on W+K’s “Best Job” TV commercial for P&G. “If you had passed me the script I think I might have vomited. You Americans, you wade around in this treacle of emotion…” said Hegarty wryly. “But the way you [Wieden] executed it really worked….The vomit factor was high…but the directing worked.” “It’s the power of storytelling, you’ve got to make sure the emotions are relevant and just let yourselves be swept up by it,” agreed Wieden.

Sir Hegarty discussed the campaign called ‘Dean Savage’ for Google Chrome, and how it turned a brand which is usually perceived to be unemotional to emotional. “Some of the best advertising, is not advertising”, continued Hegarty, referring to Google Chrome’s support of the ” It gets better” initiative. The work done by BBH NY could have easily backfired on the company, said Hegarty. “We tried to put it into a place that wasn’t advertising, that was part of the social fabric of life.”

“When you do your job right, you add something to the value of the brand, not just for the audience but for the people who work there,” commented Wieden. “Google is perceived as a less emotional group of people but when a spot like that comes out, it humanises them.”

Sir Hegarty next focused on the importance of motivation. “In this industry, one gets motivated via competition’s work. The ‘Old Spice’ ad is a spectacular example of good work and when I watched it I felt jealous. However, two minutes later, I was determined to do better work for Axe. Therefore, in order to do great work, we need competition to succeed, as then at that time even clients fuel up, which further motivates to create good work,” he noted.

“When truly great work happens, and it isn’t yours, the gut instinct is to hate it with a passion”, said Hegarty. “I remember the moment one of our account people came to me and said, ‘John, I think you’d better have a look at this,”—it was the first ad for Old Spice. “You know something’s great when you really really f***ing hate it. I hated it. I stood up, looked at this ad and thought, ‘Who did that? Is it W+K? SHIT! OhSHIT!’.” Then Hegarty recalled running out of the office and yelling for the latest scripts for Axe, their agency’s rival brand to Old Spice. “We had to do better! The better they do! The better we do! Great creativity drives each other, two people run a race faster than alone.” The Old Spice ads were a prime example of great writing, he concluded.

“I had the same hateful reaction when the Xbox ‘Life’s too Short’ spot came out,” admitted Wieden.

Like the Levi’s laundry ad, the Xbox commercial was entirely done without script, noted Wieden. “It was the craft of the spot that pulled it completely into superspace.” Commercials like these are only possible when clients are brave, said Hegarty. “You can imagine us presenting this to Xbox, ‘She’s got her legs like this… and…’ The client rejected it, but we got it posted online and it went viral—never give up, keep pushing.”

The two agencies have even ‘swapped’ clients. BBH resigned Nike which went to W+K and BBH won Guardian off W+K. The result of the change was the Levi’s Go Forth ad and Guardian’s Gold Lion-winning “Three Little Pigs commercial. “I’m pleased that Levi’s went to you and not the agency before us, which I cannot name, but they produced unutterable crap,” chuckled Hegarty. “W+K, however, told Levi’s story in a powerful and compelling way.”

Taking the example of the commercial for the UK-based newspaper, The Guardian, Sir Hegarty said, “It is all about the art of storytelling and we should master how to tell the simplest of the stories in the most interesting way.”

Asked how the industry should evolve and improve, both men, not surprisingly, said it’s all about the quality of the work. “Make the bloody work better,” Hegarty said. “I keep going on about it. We must be the only industry in the world that actually thinks you can succeed when the work’s getting worse. There’s empirical evidence in the U.K. that our audience believes the advertising has gotten worse. … Obviously, Cannes is about this question. But what are we doing about it? How are we working to make the work better?”

It needs to be honest, too,” said Wieden. “There’s so much strategy sometimes, and all this bullshit. What is the emotional essence of this issue right now? And clients, I think, sometimes have to look at themselves in the mirror and say, ‘Who have we become? How do we get back to where we used to be?’ “


Cannes Alternative Grand Prix (2001/2011)

Grand Prix 2001 – FOX Regional Sports (Turkey/China/Russia/India)

A Turkish sports reporter is at a cliff-diving tournament. A diver jumps off a steep cliff, goes into a ‘swan dive’ and lands on dirt. Turkish peasants clap politely. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

A Chinese sports reporter is showing highlights of a ‘tree catching’ competition. We see two lumberjacks chop down a giant 200-ft tree for an athlete to catch. He is not successful. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

A Russian sports reporter is covering a ‘slapping contest’ in a smokey, seedy bunker. Two large men take turns slapping each other in the face. Suddenly, an impressive slap causes the drunken crowd to erupt. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

The host of a Mumbai sports show is interviewing the National Clubbing Champion. Two blindfolded men chase each other with clubs in front of a large crowd. They swing wildly at each other … but miss. Then one loses his bearings and starts pounding a gentleman in the crowd. Super: Sports news from the only region you care about. Yours. Fox Sports Net.

Advertising Agency: Cliff Freeman and Partners, USA
Creative Director: Eric Silver
Copywriter: Dan Morales
Art Director: Rossana Bardales
Production Company: Partizan NY
Director: Traktor

Alternative Grand Prix – John West (Bear)

At a river, a man fights a bear for a salmon. Voiceover: John West endure the worst to bring you the best. Super: John West Red Salmon.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett UK
Creative Director: Mark Tutssel
Copywriter: Paul Silburn
Art Director: Paul Silburn
Production Company: Spectre UK
Director: Daniel Kleinman

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2002 – Nike (Tag)

A young man is tagged in an elaborate game, involving the entire city. He races off to tag someone else, and they elude him to the very end.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, USA
Creative Director: Dan Wieden, Hal Curtis, Jim Riswold
Art Director: Monica Taylor, Andy Fackrell
Director: Frank Budgen

Alternative Grand Prix – Levis (Odyssey)

A man and a woman hurtle through a string of solid walls. They crash out of the building, land on a tree, and run up it into the night sky.

Advertising Agency: BBH, UK
Creative Director: Stephen Butler
Art Director: Gavin Lester
Production Company: Academy, UK
Director: Jonathan Glazer

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2003 – IKEA (Lamp)

An old lamp is thrown out to make way for a new one from Ikea.

Advertising Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky, USA
Creative Director: Alex Bogusky, Paul Keister
Art Director: Mark Taylor, Steve Mapp
Copywriter: Ari Merkin
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Spike Jonze

Alternative Grand Prix – Honda (Cog)

Cog is a two-minute chain reaction using only parts from a Honda Accord. Each car part cleverly triggers off the next, showing the beauty and precision of the pieces, and the ingenuity of the engineers who built it, prompting the V/O to comment “Isn’t it nice when things just work?”.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy, London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth
Art Director: Matt Gooden
Copywriter: Ben Walker
Production Company: Partizan, London
Director: Antoine Bardou-Jacquet

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2004 – Playstation 2 (Mountain)

Hundreds of thousands of people are forming a human mountain higher than any of the other buildings in the city. At it’s zenith a variety of people enjoy a moment of exhilaration before others scramble over them and take their place.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/London
Creative Director: Trevor Beattie
Art Director: Tony McTear
Copywriter: Paula Marcantonio, Tony McTear
Production Company: Gorgeous Enterprises, UK
Director: Frank Budgen

Alternative Grand Prix – Lynx 24-7 (Getting Dressed)

A man and woman wake up in bed. They start getting dressed. We soon discover that their clothes are scattered right across the city. The last shoe sits by two opposite-facing shopping trolleys in a supermarket. The couple met there only hours ago. The man was wearing Lynx 24/7 bodyspray.

Advertising Agency: BBH, UK
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Art Director: Nick Gill
Copywriter: Nick Gill
Production Company: Small Family Business, UK
Director: Ringan Ledwidge

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2005 – Honda (Grrr)

Can hate be a good thing? Honda ‘Grrr’ sets out to prove just that. A tranquil world is invaded by flying, dirty old Diesel engines. However, the population get angry and even, using their hate for the better, destroying every last one. Finally, they herald the brand new Honda Diesel.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy, London
Creative Director: Tony Davidson, Kim Papworth, Chris O’reilly
Art Director: Sean Thompson, Michael Russoff, Richard Russell
Copywriter: Sean Thompson, Michael Russoff, Richard Russell
Production Company: Nexus Production, London
Director: Adam Foulkes, Alan Smith

Alternative Grand Prix – Adidas (Hello Tomorrow)

Adidas 1 is the first shoe with a computer. “Hello Tomorrow” demonstrates that with every step these magical shoes can create an entirely new world out of nothing. It is a story of rebirth and
taking your first steps – again.

Advertising Agency: TBWA/Chiat/Day, San Francisco
Creative Director: Lee Clow, Chuck McBride, Joe Kayser
Art Director: Joe Kayser
Copywriter: Chuck McBride
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Spike Jonze

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2006 – Guinness (Noitulove)

Three young men at a bar drink Guinness. Suddenly the action pauses and the film starts to play in reverse. The men walk backwards out of the bar. As they walk they seamlessly go back down the evolutionary chain through hundreds, thousands, millions of years. Super: GUINNESS. Good things come to those who wait.

Advertising Agency: Abbott, Mead, Vickers, BBDO, UK
Creative Director: Paul Brazier
Art Director: Matt Doman
Copywriter: Ian Heartfield
Production Company: Kleinman Productions, London
Director: Danny Kleinman

Alternative Grand Prix – Sony (Balls)

Dropping 250,000 brightly coloured bouncy balls down the streets of San Francisco for real = colour like no other.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative Director: Richard Flintman
Art Director: Juan Cabral
Copywriter: Juan Cabral
Production Company: MJZ, London
Director: Nicolai Fuglsig

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2007 – Dove (Evolution)

We created a film that exposed the manipulation of the female image in the media. The objective was to encourage discussion around the subject of real beauty and lead people to the campaignforrealbeauty website.”

Advertising Agency: Ogilvy & Mother Toronto
Creative Director: Janet Kestin, Nancy Vonk
Art Director: Tim Piper, Mike Kirkland
Copywriter: Tim Piper
Production Company: Reginald Pike, Toronto
Director: Yael Staav, Tim Piper

Alternative Grand Prix – Epuron (Power of Wind)

Wind has a strong nature. Better keep him busy…

Advertising Agency: Nordpol + Hamburg, Germany
Creative Director: Lars Ruehmann
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann, Joakim Reveman
Copywriter: Matthew Branning
Production Company: Paranoid Projects, USA
Director: The Vikings

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2008 – Cadbury (Gorilla)/Microsoft (Halo 3 Campaign)

We hear ‘In the air tonight’ by Phil Collins as we realize we’re in front of a calm looking gorilla. ‘I’ve been waiting for this moment for all of my life…’ The ape stretches its neck like a heavyweight boxer would do before a fight. He’s sitting in front of a massive drum kit as the best drum fill of the history of rock is coming. The Gorilla knows this. He smashes the drums phenomenally – feeling every beat. The camera leaves the ape and his drum. United, the way they are meant to be.

Advertising Agency: Fallon London
Creative Director: Richard Flinthan, Juan Cabral
Art Director: Juan Cabral
Copywriter: Juan Cabral
Production Company: Blink, London
Director: Juan Cabral

On-line, the Halo 3 website served as a virtual museum, providing an interactive fly through of the entire John 117 monument and putting visitors right in the middle of the fight. They could also learn more about our enemies and hear first hand stories from the men who were there. For that we filmed interviews with surviving veterans of the battle who served with Master Chief. They talked about their experiences and spoke with reverence and awe about what it was like to serve with mankind’s greatest hero.

Advertising Agency: T.A.G. San Francisco/McCann Worldgroup
Creative Director: Geoff Edwars, Scott Duchon
Art Director: Ben Wolan
Copywriter: Rich Herrera
Production Company: Go Film, Hollywood/RSA Films Los Angeles
Director: Simon McQuoid, Rupert Sanders, Neil Blomkamp

Alternative Grand Prix – Nike (Next Level)

“Next Level” is new take on Football from Nike. Made to inspire football obsessed teens, the film is a first-person journey up the football ranks–from being discovered by Arsenal in a youth match to a life-defining moment playing for our national side. Along the way we experience success (finishing a cross from Cesc Fabregas) as well as frustration (getting burned by Ronaldinho). The film celebrates playing the game with purpose and passion. It shows what it takes to become a modern, brilliant fofotballer – to take your game to the next level.

Advertising Agency: 72 And Sunny, USA
Creative Director: Glen Cole, John Boiler, Bryan Rowles, Jason Norcross
Production Company: Anonymous Content, USA
Director: Guy Ritchie

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2009 – Philips (Carousel)

Philips set out to own the idea of a cinematic viewing experience at home. From the start the strategy was to create a film that movie lovers would want to see.

The film is hosted within a site that, through interaction, educates the audience about the three main features of Philips televisions – Ambilight, Cinema 21:9 and Picture Quality – and ties these features to the act of film making. So, what would movie lovers want to see? We decided on a seamless tracking shot, one long take that a film loving audience could marvel at and be fascinated by. Within the ‘housing’ of a tracking shot we inserted behind the scenes glimpses where the experts could talk about their craft and the decisions they made whilst filming the shot. The DOP on lighting, the Director on the 21:9 format and VFX supervisor shows why picture quality is so important. To allow for more interaction, we decided that a frozen time film, shot using a state of the art motion control rig, would give the audience control upon interaction allowing them to literally move the camera back and forth frame by frame. This is done intuitively through a ‘grabbing hand’ cursor when the screen is moused over.

What makes this interaction really special is the interactive cinematic score. The score, composed by Michael Fakesch, was composed as a linear piece, but was then handed over to a flash music developer to carve up and distort as the user moved back and forth through time, frame by frame – all designed to pull the audience in and hold them there longer whilst they try to unravel the mystery of how the film was made.

The second main element of interaction is the way the audience is able to trigger the three behind-the-scenes educational scenes from the film’s timeline. When the user clicks on the timeline, they reveal films within the film. The timeline unfolds and expands, the post production disappears, each expert walks in and the rigging reappears revealing that all along the actors were simply holding their position whilst a state of the art motion rig captured them in frozen time. All this was designed to be as seamless as possible with maximum visual reward ensuring the audience clicked all three of the hotspots.

In addition to the interaction within the film, the ratio of the film itself could be changed at anytime through first person interaction. This simple, but effective comparison tool really did get across the spectacle of the new Philips 21:9 TV. The other elegantly simple piece of interaction is Ambilight on and off, in the words of the DOP – “you really miss it when it’s not there.”  A final point worth noting is the dynamic title sequence. Instead of a traditional loader, we crafted a title sequence correspond to the speed of the users internet connection. The slower the connection, the longer the sequence.

Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB Amsterdam
Creative Director: Michael Fakesch, Chris Baylis, Andrew Ferguson
Art Director: Mariota Essery, Maximilliano Chanan
Copywriter: Carla Madden
Production Company: Stink Digital, London
Director: Adam Berg

Alternative Grand Prix – T-Mobile (Dance)

On 15th January at 11am, a single commuter started dancing in the middle of a train station. The dance grew as more dancers joined in, until there were over 300 people perfectly choreographed. The excitement caused hundred’s of genuine unsuspecting members of the public to join in and share the moment.

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, London
Creative Director: Paul Silburn, Kate Stanners
Art Director: Rick Dodds
Copywriter: Stephen Howell
Production Company: Partizan, London
Director: Michael Gracey

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2010 – Old Spice (The Men Your Man Could Smell Like)

This TV commercial was created to appeal to men as well as women, showing them both how great a man can smell when they use Old Spice Body Wash.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Portland
Creative Director: Mark Fitzloff, Susan Hoffman
Art Director: Craig Allen, Eric Kallman
Copywriter: Craig Allen, Eric Kallmacanal
Production Company: MJZ, Los Angeles
Director: Tom Kuntz

Alternative Grand Prix – Canal + (Closet)

Canal+ launched its new ‘Original Creativity’ campaign in September 2009. The objective highlight to Canal+’s showcase of original programming, consisting of series, documentaries and fictions, created exclusively by and for Canal+, scripted by prestigious writers such as Olivier Marchal and Jean- Hugues Anglade. To launch this new campaign, we produced THE CLOSET. The film unites quality, humour, originality and a touch of impertinence inherent to the brand’s communications: ‘Never underestimate the power of a great story”

Advertising Agency: BETC EURO RSCG, Paris
Creative Director: Stephane Xiberras
Art Director: Eric Astorgue
Copywriter: Jean Christophe Royer
Production Soixan7e Quin5e, Paris
Director: Matthijs van Heijningen

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Grand Prix 2011 – Nike (Write the Future)

Every four years, the keys to football heaven are dangled in front of the international elite. One goal, one pass, one game saving tackle can be the difference between fame and forgotten. What happens on the pitch in that split second has a ripple effect that goes beyond the match and the tournament.
‘Write the Future’ was a messaging platform that allowed Nike to show how football creates this ripple effect. It allowed us to give a glimpse into the future to see what the players were really playing for, in their own lives and the lives of those that follow them. Our goal was to weave the brand into the conversations around this major tournament in a way that celebrated the participating teams and athletes and engaged football fans around the world.

Advertising Agency: Wieden + Kennedy, Amsterdam
Creative Director: Jeff Kling, Mark Bernath, Eric Quennoy
Art Director: Stuart Harkness, Freddie Powell
Copywriter: Stuart Harkness, Freddie Powell
Production Company: Independent Films, London
Director: Alejandro Gonzales Inarritu

Alternative Grand Prix – Volkswagen (The Force)/Crysler (Born of Fire)

For the all-new 2012 Passat , Volkswagen brings Star Wars™ to one of TV’s most talked about events. Accompanied by John Williams’ iconic “The Imperial March,” the spot features the most infamous villain in the galaxy, a pint-sized Darth Vader who uses the Force when he discovers the all-new 2012 Passat in the driveway. The two iconic brands leverage humor and the unforgettable Star Wars score to create an emotional spot and make Super Bowl ad history.

Advertising Agency: Deutsch, Los Angeles
Creative Director: Eric Springer, Michael Kadin
Art Director: Ryan Mclaughlin, Craig Melchiano
Copywriter: David Povill
Production Park Pictures, Santa Monica
Director: Lance Acord

Of the big three American car companies, Chrysler was in the most danger of failing. Had there not been a last-minute vote of confidence from the U.S. Government, they would not exist. This was public knowledge, debated throughout the country—should we have loaned Chrysler the money?  When it came time to introduce a new product, we had a car to sell and also had to win back America’s confidence. To do this, we took the unlikely position of embracing Chrysler’s Detroit heritage when every other American car company was distancing themselves from the city.  We created a 2-minute homage to Detroit, a city primed for a comeback, and ran the spot only once, on Super Bowl Sunday.

Advertising Agency: Weiden + Kennedy Portland
Creative Director: Mark Fitzloff, Susan Hoffman, Aaron Allen
Art Director: Jim Lasser
Copywriter: Mark Fitzloff, Joe Staples, Kevin Jones, Greg Rutter, Dan Kroeger
Production: Serial Pictures, Culver City
Director: Samuel Bayer


15 years of Axe Effect: the world’s most sexist advertising campaign

From Unilever Website: “In the film The Matrix, Keanu Reeves is given two choices. He can either take a blue pill and wake up in the morning as if nothing has happened or pop a red pill and enter the unpredictable ‘wonderland’ of the Matrix. As millions of guys around the world know, Axe has taken the red pill.”

The “Axe Effect” is one of the most famous claim in the world. This so called effect is supposed to draw women in hordes to any male who has sprayed himself liberally with the Axe deodorant. The advertisements are very slick and usually display a normal male but with oodles of self-assurance as an Axe user. The females get irresistibly drawn to this male implying that Axe acts like a nasal aphrodisiac.

The Axe brand of deodorants is from Unilever and is primarily targeted at 15 to 25 year old males. The brand portrays normal yet cool, trendy and confident, a positioning that is aspirational to the target segment. And the portrayed outcome where the girls flock to the Axe user is, well let’s just say very desirable. At a more subtle level, the Axe Effect also acts on the confidence levels of the user. The very act of being associated with the brand serves to boost the ego.

In the past couple of years, we have seen a slew of copy cat brands hit the market. But the theme for the advertisements remains the same. Guy sprays himself with the deodorant. Girls find themselves inexplicably drawn to the guy. There are slight variants but for the most part, involuntary seduction forms the core. The one notable difference though is that all these newbies use hunks as opposed to the regular guys which are a stable for the Axe advertisements. This strategy has proven very effective for the brand. It comes across as approachable and it acts like a confidante and friend to its users. While everyone would love to be friends with a celebrity, there would still be a distance or an aloofness that would prevent a close relationship. Axe bridges this very gap effectively, and yet keeps the dream of getting a Charlie’s angel some day. It is for this very reason that Axe continues to be the market leader in its category.


Lynx Deodorant – White House


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Pat Doherty
Copywriter: Will Awdry
Art Director: Rosie Arnold
Year: 1998

Lynx Deodorant – GingerbreadMan/Jack/Ivor The Engine/Pinocchio/Trumpton






Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Dennis Lewis
Copywriter: Will Awdry
Art Director: RRosie Arnold
Year: 1998

Axe Deodorant – Confessional


Advertising Agency: Ammirati Puris Lintas Warzava, Poland
Creative Director: Chris Matyzczyk
Copywriter: Agneszka Galas
Art Director: Chris Rozek
Year: 1999
Shortlist

Lynx Deodorant – Sexual Harassment Quote


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Dennis Lewis
Copywriter: Hugh Todd
Art Director: Adam Scholes
Year: 1999

Lynx Deodorant – Sexual Harassment Quote


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Dennis Lewis
Copywriter: John O’Keeffe
Art Director: Russell Ramsey
Year: 1999

Axe Shower Gel for Men – Shower Curtain/Shower Rod/Shower Drain


Advertising Agency: Ammirati Puris Lintas, Netherlands
Creative Director: Cor Der Boen
Copywriter: Cor Der Boen
Art Director: Akan Conskunsoy
Year: 1999
Shortlist

Lynx Deodorant – Not You Again


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas Australia
Creative Director: Marc Schattner
Copywriter: Robin Feiner
Art Director: Helena Hybs
Year: 2000

Lynx Deodorant – Hands


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas Australia
Creative Director: Marc Schattner
Copywriter: Annelie Strydom
Art Director: Robbie Kantor
Year: 2000

Axe Deodorant – Wedding Cake


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas & Partners, Brazil
Creative Director: Atila Francucci
Copywriter: Marcelo Alemida
Art Director: Marco Antonio
Year: 2000
Bronze Lion

Axe Deodorant – Bathroom/Sperm


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas & Partners, Brazil
Creative Director: Atila Francucci
Copywriter: Fernando Nobre, Marcelo Alemida
Art Director: Marco Antonio
Year: 2000
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Nun


Advertising Agency: VegaOlmoSponce
Creative Director: Damien Kepel
Copywriter: Pablo Minces
Art Director: Joan Cruz Bobillo
Year: 2000

Axe Deodorant – Turn-o-matic


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas & Partners, Spain
Creative Director: Manolo Valmorisco
Copywriter: Santiago Pina
Art Director:Fernando Jerez
Year: 2000

Lynx Deodorant – Train Map


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas Australia
Creative Director: Marc Schattner
Copywriter: Robin Feiner
Art Director: Helena Hibs
Year: 2000

Lynx Deodorant – Weddings


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Hugg Tod
Art Director: Adam Scholes
Year: 2000
Shortlist

Axe Gravity – Gravity


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas & Partners, France
Creative Director: Gregoire Delacourt
Copywriter: Benjiamin Samial
Art Director: Catherine Bouard
Year: 2001

Lynx Deodorant – Wheelbarrow/Chair/Cement Mixer


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Matt Walker
Art Director: Dave Monk
Year: 2001

Lynx Shampoo – Wildest/Never Before/Thrilling


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: George Prest
Art Director: Johnny Leathers
Year: 2001

Lynx Deodorant – Wheelbarrow/Chair/Cement Mixer


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Hugg Tod
Art Director: Adam Scholes
Year: 2001

Axe Online


Advertising Agency: Lowe Porta & Partners, Chile
Creative Director: Francisco Guarello
Copywriter: Lorena Hola
Art Director: Leo Farfan
Year: 2001

Axe Deodorant – Pin-up


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas & Partners, Spain
Creative Director: Santiago Pina
Copywriter: Miriam Martineza
Art Director: Alberto Contreras
Year: 2001

Axe Deodorant – Cards


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas & Partners, Mexico
Creative Director: Luis Lance
Copywriter: Luis Lance
Art Director: Juan Jaime Aceves
Year: 2001

Axe Deodorant – Shower


Advertising Agency: VegaOlmosPonce
Creative Director: Javier Fabregas
Copywriter: Lucas Panizza
Art Director: Norberto Vatrano
Year: 2001

Axe Deodorant – Bride and Groom


Advertising Agency: Lowe Porta, Chile
Creative Director: Kiko Carcavilla
Copywriter: Pablo Gallardo
Art Director: Josè Miguel Pizarro
Year: 2002

Axe Deodorant – Effect


Advertising Agency: Lowe Porta, Chile
Creative Director: Rene Moraga
Copywriter: Raul Vidal
Art Director: Rene Moraga
Year: 2002

Lynx Deodorant – Pants/Jacket/Shirt


Advertising Agency: GingKo Lowe & Partners, Uruguay
Creative Director: Sofia Fornaro
Copywriter: Sofia Fornaro
Art Director: Sofia Fornaro
Year: 2002
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Back Scratch & Sniff


Advertising Agency: BBH Singapore
Creative Director: Steve Elrik
Copywriter:Todd Waldron
Art Director: Kelly Pon
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Heart Ass


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Amir Faharang
Art Director: Matt Campbell
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Coffea Break/Sorority/Therapist


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Ryan Blank
Art Director: Mike Hahn
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Axe Effect


Advertising Agency: Lowe Pirella, Milan
Creative Director: Piero Lo Faro
Copywriter: Claudia Bavelloni
Art Director: Daniela Marsetti
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Snow White


Advertising Agency: Lowe Lintas & Partners, Hamburg
Creative Director: Michael Funk, Holgen Prendky
Copywriter: Henriu Ticksen
Art Director: Mithra Daryabegi
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Babe on board


Advertising Agency: BBH Singapore
Creative Director: Steve Elrik
Copywriter: Parak Tembulkar
Art Director: Scott McClelland
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – New Long Lasting Effect


Advertising Agency: Leche Lowe Worldwide, Chile
Creative Director: Francisco Guarello
Copywriter: Sebastian Arteaga, Lorena Hola
Art Director: Josè Luis Estevez
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Scratches


Advertising Agency: Lowe Porta, Santiago
Creative Director: Kiko Carcavilla, Pablo Gallardo
Copywriter:Pablo Gallardo
Art Director: Paul Beelen
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – The Swimming Instructor


Advertising Agency: Lowe Brussels
Creative Director: Georges Lafleur
Copywriter: Veronique Sels
Art Director: Dominique Vangilberg
Year: 2003

Axe Shower – Train/Shower


Advertising Agency: BBH Singapore
Creative Director: Steve Elrik
Copywriter: Parak Tembulkar
Art Director: David Wong
Year: 2003

Axe Facial Foam – Kisses


Advertising Agency: BBH Singapore
Creative Director: Steve Elrik
Copywriter: Parak Tembulkar
Art Director: David Wong
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Flammable Bikini


Advertising Agency: Lowe Brazil
Creative Director: Julio Anderey, Martin Juarez, Valmir Leite
Copywriter: Rodrigo Kallas
Art Director: Edson Kerbe Jimmy
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Little evils


Advertising Agency: Lowe Brazil
Creative Director: Julio Anderey, Martin Juarez, Valmir Leite
Copywriter: Marcelo Camargo
Art Director: Mrcelo Camargo
Year: 2003

Lynx Deodorant – Australia/Brazil/Thailand/Amsterdam


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Matt Waller
Art Director: Dave Monk
Year: 2003
Shortlist

Lynx Deodorant – Woman


Advertising Agency: Lowe Ginkgo, Uruguay
Creative Director: Gabriel Roman
Copywriter: Sofia Fornaro
Art Director: Alejandro Rodriguez
Year: 2003
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Ashtray/Broom


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull Calvert Pace, South Africa
Creative Director: Rob Mclennan
Copywriter: Matthew Brink
Art Director: Adam Livesey
Year: 2003

Axe Deodorant – Nuts/Pencil/Plug


Advertising Agency: Lowe & Partner, Dubai
Creative Director: Nirmar Diwadkar
Copywriter: Manoj Ammanath
Art Director: Adham Obeid
Year: 2004
Shortlist

Axe Body Spray – Family Announcements


Advertising Agency: Lowe Amsterdam
Creative Director: Ivan Van Der Zwan
Copywriter: Dylan De Backer
Art Director: Joris Kuijepers
Year: 2004
Shortlist

Lynx Deodorant Dry – Wheather Symbols


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Adam Chiappe
Art Director: Saunby
Year: 2004
Shortlist

Lynx Deodorant – Beer/Wood


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Marc Hatfield, Pete Bradly
Copywriter: George Prest
Art Director: Adrian Rossi
Year: 2004
Shortlist

Lynx Deodorant – Advent Calendar


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Marc Hatfield, Pete Bradly
Copywriter: Matt Wallen, Dave Monk
Art Director: Matt Waller, Dave Monk
Year: 2004

Lynx Deodorant – Britney


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Marc Hatfield, Pete Bradly
Copywriter: Alex Grieve
Art Director: Adrian Rossi
Year: 2004
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Ashtray/Broom


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull, Johannesburg
Creative Director: Rob Mclennan
Copywriter: Matthew Brink
Art Director: Adam Livesey
Year: 2004
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Busker/Hobo/Bag Lady


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull, Johannesburg
Creative Director: Rob Mclennan
Copywriter: Matthew Brink
Art Director: Adam Livesey
Year: 2004
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Dolls/Duck


Advertising Agency: Lowe SSPM, Bogotà
Creative Director: Josè Miguel Sokoloff
Copywriter: Juan Carlos Palma
Art Director: Mauricio Jimenez
Year: 2004

Axe Body Spray – Lodge/Horseback Riding/Gondola/Footsie


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Peter Rosch
Art Director: John Hobbs
Year: 2004

Axe Deodorant – Video Store/Lingerie/Inspiration Point


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Matt Ian
Art Director: Gerald Lewis
Year: 2004
Silver Lion for the campaign

Axe Body Spray – Show Them The Way


Advertising Agency: VegaOlmosPonce
Creative Director: Hernan Ponce, Pablo Batlle
Copywriter: Mario Crudele, Alejandro Garone
Art Director: Martin Ponce, Rodrigo Isaia
Year: 2004

Lynx Deodorant Touch – Jeans/Zip


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Claudia Southgate
Art Director: Verity Fenner
Year: 2004

Lynx Deodorant Dry – Shirt/Tattoo


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Marc Hatfield, Pete Bradley
Copywriter: Claudia Southgate
Art Director: Verity Fenner
Year: 2005

Lynx Body Spray – Linx Jet Campaign


Advertising Agency: Lowe Hunt, Sidney
Creative Director: Adam Lance
Direct Creative Director: Peter Bidenko
Copywriter:  Michael Canning
Art Director: Simone Brandse
Year: 2005
Bronze Lion for the campaign

Axe Deodorant – 100 Sexiest Men in the World/The Milkman


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull, Johannesburg
Creative Director: Rob Mclennan, Stuart Walsh
Copywriter: Matthew Brink
Art Director: Adam Livesey
Year: 2005
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Snowflakes


Advertising Agency: BBH Singapore
Creative Director: Steve Elrik
Copywriter: Noel Yeo
Art Director: Elyn Wong
Year: 2005

Lynx Deodorant Dry – Dirty Girl


Advertising Agency: Lowe Hunt, Sidney
Creative Director: Adam Lance
Copywriter: Michael Canning
Art Director: Simone Brandse
Year: 2005
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Sofa/Marathon Table/Whip Cream/Take a Number


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Matt Ian
Art Director: Amee Shah
Year: 2005

Axe Deodorant – It Can Happen Anywhere


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Matt Ian
Art Director: Amee Shah
Year: 2005

Lynx Deodorant – “You Never Know When” Campaign


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Nick Gill
Art Director: Rosie Arnold
Year: 2005
Shortlist

Axe Shower Gel – Grip Pads/Miror/Towel


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Tom Kraemer
Art Director: Nick Klinkert
Year: 2005
Bronze Lion for the campaign

Axe Deodorant – Santa Claus


Advertising Agency: Lowe San Paolo
Creative Director: Valmir Leite, Theo Rocha
Copywriter: Mauricio Machado
Art Director: Sergio Barros
Year: 2005

Axe Deodorant – Sweeties/Teacher


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull, Johannesburg
Creative Director: Rob Mclennan, Gareth Lessing
Copywriter: Tim Beck
Art Director: Sean Harrison
Year: 2005

Axe Deodorant – Peep Hole


Advertising Agency: Lowe & Partner, Dubai
Creative Director: Manoj Ammanath
Copywriter: Ash Chagla
Art Director: ASm Zijad
Year: 2005
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Birds Eye View


Advertising Agency: Lowe & Partner, Dubai
Creative Director: Manoj Ammanath
Copywriter: Ash Chagla
Art Director: ASm Zijad
Year: 2005

Run Boy Run


Advertising Agency: Lowe & Partner, Dubai
Creative Director: Manoj Ammanath
Copywriter: Sandeep Fernandes
Art Director: Christine Mercier
Year: 2005

Axe Deodorant – Sweeties/Teacher


Advertising Agency: VegaOlmoSponce
Creative Director: Hernan Ponce
Copywriter: Hernan Ibarra
Art Director: Angel Castiglia
Year: 2005

Axe Body Spray – Bed’s Campaign







Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull, Johannesburg
Creative Director: Rob Mclennan, Gareth Lessing
Copywriter: Asheen Naido
Art Director: Marion Griffits
Year: 2005

Axe Deodorant – Kiss Bill


Advertising Agency: Lowe Mexico
Creative Director: Humberto Polar, Fernando Osuna
Copywriter: Walter Nava
Art Director: Pedro Mayorga
Year: 2005

Axe Deodorant – Fallen Angel


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull, Johannesburg
Creative Director: Gareth Lessing
Copywriter: Gareth Lessing
Art Director: Tatjana Buisson
Year: 2006
Shortlist

Lynx Deodorant – Sex Letters Campaign













Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Alex Grieve
Art Director: Adrian Rossi
Year: 2006
Shortlist

Lynx Deodorant – Click Campaign


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Ed Edwards
Art Director: Dave Masterman
Year: 2006

Axe Deodorant – Subway Map/Contour Map/Island Print


Advertising Agency: BBH Asia Pacific, Singapore
Creative Director: RTodd Waldron
Copywriter: Beth Ryan
Art Director: Ross Ventress, Elyn Wong
Year: 2006

Axe Deodorant – Tetris


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bangkok
Creative Director: Supong Khaotong, Kittinan Sawasdee
Copywriter: Panusard Tanhashindawong
Art Director: Vancelin Teng
Year: 2006

Axe Deodorant – Bedtime Reading


Advertising Agency: Brancom Dubai
Creative Director: Manoji Ammhanath
Copywriter: Sandeep Fernandes
Art Director: Husen Baba Khan
Year: 2006

Axe Deodorant – Khalid


Advertising Agency: Brancom Dubai
Creative Director: Manoji Ammhanath
Copywriter: Ash Chagla
Art Director: Rachna Dhall
Year: 2006

Axe Body Spray – Loin Cloth/Moustache/Flag


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Nathan Frank
Art Director: Andre Massis
Year: 2006

Axe Deodorant – Postcards Campaign (Car/Cupboard/Elevator/Bleacher)


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Nathan Frank
Art Director: Andre Massis
Year: 2006

Axe Deodorant – Name-Number


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: William Gelner
Copywriter: Nathan Frank
Art Director: Andre Massis
Year: 2006
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Threesome


Advertising Agency: Brancom Dubai
Creative Director: Manoji Ammhanath
Copywriter: Nisha Vagh
Art Director: Timsy Vadhani
Year: 2006

Axe Deodorant – Do Not Disturb


Advertising Agency: Brancom Dubai
Creative Director: Manoji Ammhanath
Copywriter: Sandeep Fernandes
Art Director: Husen Baba Khan
Year: 2006

Axe Deodorant – Get a Girlfriend Campaign 2006

Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull, Johannesburg
Creative Director: Gareth Lessing, Robe McLennan
Copywriter: Matthew Brink
Art Director: Adam Livesey
Year: 2006
Silver Lion for the campaign

Axe Body Shower – Blowing Bubbles


Advertising Agency: Lowe MENA, Dubai
Creative Director: Dominic Stallard, Clinton Manson
Copywriter: Clinton Manson
Art Director: Dominic Stallard
Year: 2007
Shortlist

Axe Body Shower – Milkshake/Groucho/Birds/Get Well


Advertising Agency: Lowe MENA, Dubai
Creative Director: Dominic Stallard, Clinton Manson
Copywriter: Clinton Manson
Art Director: Dominic Stallard
Year: 2007
Shortlist

Axe Body Spray – Females/Show’er


Advertising Agency: Lowe MENA, Dubai
Creative Director: Dominic Stallard, Clinton Manson
Copywriter: Clinton Manson
Art Director: Dominic Stallard
Year: 2007

Axe Deodorant – Sperm


Advertising Agency: Uncle Grey, Aarhus
Creative Director: Per Pedersen
Copywriter: Per Pedersen
Art Director: Resmus Gottliebsen
Year: 2007

Axe Recovery Shower Gel – Bathmat/Pillows/Toilet


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: Kevin Roddy, William Gelner
Copywriter: Tim Geoghegan, 
Art Director: Caprice Yu
Year: 2007

Axe Lab Eau De Toilette – Back to Back/Chest Bump/Tongues


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: Kevin Roddy, William Gelner
Copywriter: Tim Geoghegan, 
Art Director: Caprice Yu
Year: 2007

Lynx Deodorant – Clock


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Ben Akers, Nadine Akle
Copywriter: Ben Akers
Art Director: Nadine Akle
Year: 2007

New Axe 3 – Psychologist+Swimmer/Schoolgirl+Skier/Executive+Volley Player


Advertising Agency: VegaOlmoSponce
Creative Director: Hernan Ponce, Sebastian Stagno, Rafael D’Alvia
Copywriter: Angel Castiglia
Art Director: Facundo Romero
Year: 2007

Axe Deodorant – Get a Girlfriend Campaign 2007


This campaign is a new interpretation of “The Axe Effect”. It shows how guys are wasting time with silly activities when they should rather be getting a girlfriend with the help of Axe. The first ad shows a guy posing proudly with his prize winning Yorkshire Terrier at a dog show. The next ad features two art students re-enacting a computer game scene in front of a blackboard. The final ad shows two guys that are holding their own Scalextric Formula One Driver’s Championship.




This campaign is a new interpretation of “The Axe Effect”. It shows how guys are wasting time with silly activities when they should rather be getting a girlfriend with the help of Axe. In each execution we have placed a “Get a Girlfriend” sticker on a mock article in community newspapers. The articles featured a loser who has either become a highland dancing champion, attempted to break the world record for balancing a milk bottle on his head or been a runner-up at a Star Wars costume competition.
Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull, Johannesburg
Creative Director: Gareth Lessing
Copywriter: Matthew Brink
Art Director: Adam Livesey
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion for the campaign & Gold Lion for the campaign

Lynx Deodorant – Pizza/Iron/Cup Noodle


Advertising Agency: BBH Asia Pacific
Creative Director: Steve Elrick
Copywriter: Todd Waldron
Art Director: Ross Ventress
Year: 2007

Lynx Deodorant – Bonfire Night


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: John O’Keeffe, Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Richard McGrann
Art Director: Andy Clough
Year: 2008

Axe Deodorant – Tarzan


Advertising Agency: BBH Asia Pacific
Creative Director: Todd Waldron
Copywriter: Beth Ryan
Art Director: Poul Down
Year: 2008

Axe Dark Temptations – Blonde


Advertising Agency: VegaOlmosPonce
Creative Director: Hernan Ponce
Copywriter: Analia Rios
Art Director: Ricardo Armentano
Year: 2008
Shortlist

Axe Deodorant – Topical News


Advertising Agency: BBH Tokyo
Creative Director: Steve Elrick
Copywriter: Masashi Kayamura
Art Director: Tadashi Tsujimoto
Year: 2008

Axe Deodorant – Mars & Venus


Advertising Agency: Lowe Philippines
Creative Director: Steve Clay, Rene Dominguez
Copywriter: Aimee Espiritu
Art Director:  Bong Legaspy
Year: 2008

Axe Body Spay – McCain


Advertising Agency: BBH New York
Creative Director: Rosie Arnold
Copywriter: Alex Grieve
Art Director:  Pelle Sjoenell
Year: 2008

Axe Day & Night – Bar/Bellboy/Delivery


Headline: New Axe Day & Night. One is suitable for general audience. The other one is not.

Advertising Agency: Ponce Buenos Aires
Creative Director: Hernan Ponce, Hernan Ibarra, Walter Aregger
Direct Creative Director: Analia Rios, Ricardo Armentano
Copywriter:  Antonio De Federico
Art Director: Pedro Losada
Year: 2009
Gold Lion for the campaign

Axe Deodorant – Puppy/Baby/Wedding Ring


Advertising Agency: Lowe Ativism, Lisboa
Creative Director: Joao Coutinho
Copywriter: Ana Simoes
Art Director: Ana Magalhaes
Year: 2009

Axe Body Spray – Periodic Table


Advertising Agency: Lowe/SSP3, Bogota
Creative Director:Josè Miguel Sokoloff, Margarita Olivar
Copywriter: Juan Carlos Gonzales
Art Director:  Margarita Olivar
Year: 2009

Axe Body Spray – Nerd


Advertising Agency: Alfred International, Amsterdam
Creative Director: Patrick De Zeeuw,  Aad Kuiyper
Copywriter: Patrick De Zeeuw
Art Director:  Aad Kuiyper
Year: 2010

Lynx Deodorant – Car/Street


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Dominic Goldman
Copywriter: Dan Glover
Art Director:  Adam Thompson
Year: 2010
Shortlist

Axe Body Spray – Yearbook Picture


Advertising Agency: McCann Erickson, Tel Aviv
Creative Director: Eldad Weinberger, Sigal Abudy
Copywriter: Sigal Abudy
Art Director:  Guy Laufer
Year: 2010

Axe Body Spray – Woman’s Day


Advertising Agency: Lowe Bull Johannesburg
Creative Director: Rui Alves
Copywriter: Heidi Kesselman
Art Director:  Lee Naidoo
Year: 2010

Axe Deodorant – World Cup Argentina


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Nick Gill, Domenic Goldman
Copywriter: SHugo Bierskenk
Art Director:  Dean Woodhouse
Year: 2011
Shortlist

Axe Shower Gel – Whip/Cream/Corset


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Nick Gill, Domenic Goldman
Copywriter: Richard Mcgran
Art Director:  Andy Clogh
Year: 2011

Lynx Excite Deodorant – Even Angel Will Fall


Advertising Agency: BBH London
Creative Director: Domenic Goldman
Copywriter: Hugo Bierschenk
Art Director:  Dean Woodhouse
Year: 2011

Axe Body Spray – Tic-Tac-Toe


Advertising Agency: Lowe MENA, Dubai
Creative Director: Mark Lewis
Copywriter: Marwan Saab
Art Director:  Monsoor A Bhatti
Year: 2011

Related Post: 

Axe, Rexona, Impulse: The VegaOlmosPonce Effect

Lowe Hunt for Lynx Body Spray: The Lynx Jet Project


Lego (1981/2011) – Builders of Creativity

KIPPER

An extremely clever ad — one from your childhood. A slightly surreal look at all the things you can make out of a box a Lego. Narrated by Tommy Cooper, a battle ensues between a mouse which, when threatened by a cat, turns into a dog. The cat turns into a dragon and so on, to a submarine and a submarine-eating kipper. The submarine eventually morphs into an elephant, the mouse rebuilds and the elephant faints. Lego: It’s a new toy every day — just like that!
Agency: TBWA London
Creative: Mike Cozens; Graham Watson
Director: Ken Turner
Production: Clearwater Films
Producer: David Mitten
Director of Photography: Tom Harrison
Editor: Patrick Udale
Year: 1981
Grand Prix

FAMOUS CHILDREN
Lego representations of famous people: a dinosaur (Spielberg), a bed (Madonna), a football (Pele), windows (Bill Gates), a man levitating (David Copperfield), a broken man (Mike Tyson).
Agency: DM9 Publicidade
Creative Director: Nizan Guanaes
Copywriter: Nizan Guanaes
Production Company: Jodaf/Joao Daniel Film
Director: Joao Daniel Tikhmoiroff
Year: 1995
Gold Lion

BRAIN

Agency: JWT Publicidade
Creative Director: Anselmo Candido
Copywriter: Ricardo Adolfo
Art Director: Miguel Coimbra
Photographer: Chico Prata
Year: 1998
Bronze Lion

BOX
A group of officials arrive at the house of an ordinary boy to discover that he’s created something extraordinary, which he keeps in a box. All ideas start with imagination.
Agency: BBH
Creative Director: John Hegarty
Copywriter: Roger Beckett
Art Director: Andrew Smart
Photographer: Gorgeous Enterprises
Director: Frank Budgen
Year: 1999
Bronze Lion

SHELF

Headline: All toys, in one
Agency: DPZ Propaganda
Creative Director: Jose Zaragoza/Carlos Rocca
Copywriter: Giovana Madalosso
Art Director: Janaina Pergira
Photographer: Lucio Cunha
Year: 2002
Shortlist

WALL

Headline: The power of the brick
Agency: Lowe, New York
Creative Director: Gary Goldsmith/Dean Hacohen/Bruce Hopman
Art Director: Elizabeth Maertens
Year: 2002

ARROW/HAND

Headline: The most interactive toy.
Agency: DPZ, San Paulo
Creative Director: Carlos Silverio/Francesco Petit
Copywriter: Roberto Kilciauskas
Art Director: Fernanda Fajardo
Photographer: Marcel Vieira
Year: 2004
Shortlist

STREET BUILDING

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Santiago
Creative Director: Cesar Agost Carreno
Copywriter: Felipe Manalich
Art Director: Sergio Iacobelli/Sebastian Alvarado
Photographer: Juab Carlos Sotello
Year: 2005
Grand Prix (Outdoor Lions)

PERISCOPE/CAT

Agency: FCB Johannesburg
Creative Director: Bret Morris
Copywriter: Lance Vinning
Art Director: Lance Vinning/Charles Foley
Photographer: Gerard Turnley
Year: 2006
Grand Prix (Press Lions)

FIRE STATION/HANGAR/TRAIN STATION

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore
Creative Director: Andy Greenway
Copywriter: Stuart Harricks/Roger Makak
Art Director: Stuart Harricks
Photographer: Dean Zillwood/IDC
Year: 2006
Silver Lion for the campaign (Press)/Bronze Lion for the campaign (Outdoor)

BOX

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore
Creative Director: Andy Greenway
Copywriter: Stuart Harricks/Roger Makak
Art Director: Stuart Harricks
Photographer: Sam & Boomerang
Year: 2006
Shortlist

COSTRUCTION SITE

Describe the communication goal
LEGO wanted their communication to focus more strongly on the core product: the basic blocks. And at the same time, they still wanted to inspire children of all ages and to stimulate creativity and innovation.
Innovative Media Strategy
Construction sites are normally very boring and makes the surroundings ugly. But by turning the containers placed there into giant LEGO blocks it gave consumers a surprise, making their everyday life a bit more colourful and creative. They could “play on” themselves and start imaging how to build on. As one consumer said: “I was just standing there, waiting for a giant boy to come and build”. The media became the talk of the town. Even the Mayor of Copenhagen was proud of what it did to the city and praised it in several newspapers and television.
Engaging Creativity
LEGO is known for stimulating creativity. Transforming containers on construction sites across the country into giant, colourful LEGO blocks confirmed this for the consumer. And with no logos it also became a pleasent surprise in their everyday life. Was it and ad or wasn’t it? Nobody doubted that LEGO was the brand behind it though.
Encompassing the Audience
By turning containers into outstanding giant LEGO blocks it gave consumers a big surprise, making their everyday life more colourful and creative. In several weeks, the LEGO blocks became the talk of the town.
Effectiveness
– Massive media coverage in more than 20 national newspapers and magazines, national television and radio
– City mayors praising the project
– Hundreds of thousands consumers travelling by the blocks led to maximum awareness on the communication goal.
Agency: ADVANCE, Copenhagen
Copywriter: Michael Pedersen
Art Director: Kenneth Opsund
Year: 2006
ShortlistCOSTRUCTION
Agency: IDB/FCB Santiago
Creative Director: Rodrigo Gomez/Michael Angel Cerdeira
Copywriter: Rodrigo Figueroa
Art Director: Michael Angel Cerdeira
Year: 2006
ShortlistBUILDERS OF TOMORROW
The image is a tribute to “Lunch atop a Skyscraper (New York Construction Workers Lunching on a Crossbeam)”, a photograph taken by Charles C. Ebbets on the 69th floor during construction of the GE Building at Rockefeller Center in 1932.
Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg

Creative Director: Arno Lindemann/Bernhard Lukas
Copywriter: Daniel Schaeferk
Art Director: Szymon Rose
Photographer: Achim Lippoth
Year: 2007
Gold LionPLANE/DINOSAUR/BOAT/TANK

Agency: Blattler Brunner, Pittsburg
Creative Director: Jay Giesen/Dave Kwasnick
Art Director: Derek Julin
Year: 2007

POLYPLAYPYLENE

Describe the objective of the promotion.
Like no other toy, LEGO is a symbol of fun and creativity. To mark the fiftieth birthday of LEGO in Germany, the idea was to rekindle media representatives’ and LEGO partners’ excitement for LEGO with a high-quality mailing.
Describe how the promotion developed from concept to implementation.
LEGO fan and designer Reginald Wagner conceived, designed and photographed his personal LEGO memories with a pinhole camera to keep them from fading. The book’s format is adapted from the form of an individual LEGO brick. The book cover and the flipside are made of real LEGO plates. Journalists were sent the book and could put their name on the cover and share their memories with the designer.
Explain why the method of promotion was most relevant to the product or service.
The title of the book POLYPLAYPYLENE means “plastic that has been played with often” and that’s precisely what this book is about. Endless imagination, an endless number of construction combinations and stories from the LEGO worlds: towns, castles and space.
Describe the success of the promotion with both client and consumer including some quantifiable results.
The first, exclusive edition is out of print; the feedback was overwhelming. A paperback edition of “Polyplaypylene” is currently in print for wider circulation.
Agency: Kolle Rebbe Werbeagentur GmbH/Korefe
Creative Director: Katrin Oeding
Copywriter: Alexander Barom
Art Director: Reginald Wagner
Photographer: Reginald Wargner
Year: 2007
Shortlist

CONTROL

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Santiago
Executive Creative Director: Sebastian Alvarado/Nicolas Lopez
Creative Director: Felipe Manalich
Copywriter: Felipe Manalich
Art Director: Felipe Manalich/Sebastian Alvarado
Year: 2008
Shortlist (Press)/Shortlist (Outdoor)RUBIK’S CUBE/BRICK
Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg
Creative Director: Jan Rexhausen
Art Director: Keat Aun Tan
Photographer: Keat Aun Tan
Year: 2008
ShorlistWALL/TANK/ALI

Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg
Creative Director: Fabien Frese/Daniel Frericks/Gotz Ulmer
Copywriter: Sergio Penzo
Art Director: Andre Price
Photographer: Ragnar Schmuck
Year: 2009
ShorlistDRUG/SEX/VIOLENCE
Agency: Naga DDB/Rapp Malaysia
Creative Director: Alvin Teoh
Copywriter: Raymond Ng/Ted Lim
Art Director: Chow Kok Keong
Photographer: Chem Kim Mun (360 Degree Studio)
Year: 2009
ShorlistDRAGON/PIRATES/SPACESHIP
Headline: It start with a brick
Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi Singapore
Creative Director: Richard Copping/Andrew Pech
Copywriter: Andrew Pech
Art Director: Jon Loke/ichard Copping
Photographer: Teo Chai Guan
Year: 2009

CREATE THE IMPOSSIBLE

Agency: JUNG Von MATT, Hamburg
Creative Director: Thim Wagner/Daniel Frericks/Gotz Ulmer
Copywriter: Mathias Muller
Art Director: Damjan Pita/Alexander Musgens
Year: 2009

LEGO STAR WARS

Advertising School: Escola Cuca, Sao Paolo
Students: Diego Mourau/Gustavo Dorietto/Lucas Mohallem
Year: 2011

CATERPILLAR/MONSTER/WHALE


Agency: Ogilvy Malaysia
Executive Creative Director: Gavin Simpson/Robert Gaxiola
Creative Director: Eric Yeo
Copywriter: Greg Rawson/Ross Fowler
Art Director: David Stevanov
Year: 2011
Silver Lion for the campaign

ACCOUNTANT/ELECTRICIAN/ENGINEER

Agency: Serviceplan, Munich
Executive Creative Director:Matthias Harbeck
Creative Director: Alex Schill/Oliver Palmer
Copywriter: Frank Seiler
Art Director: Sandra Loibl/Julia Koch
Year: 2011
Bronze Lion for the campaign

SPACESHIP/BEETLE/DEEP OCEAN EXPLORER

Agency: Leo Burnett, Moscow
Creative Director: Mikhail Kudashkin
Art Director: Arina Avdeena
Copywriter: Rodrigo Linhaners
Year: 2011
Gold Lion for the campaign

BRICK THIEF

Agency: Pereira & O’Dell, San Francisco
Executive Creative Director: PJ Pereira
Creative Director: Kash Sree
Copywriter: Jaime Robinson
Art Director: Jason Apaliski
Production Company: Stimmung, Santa Monica
Director: Blue Source
Year: 2011
Shortlist

ARMCHAIR/CAR

Creatives: Jacques Denain, Nicolas Dumenil
Year: 2011

WORDS PUZZLE CAMPAIGN: CROCODILE/SPACESHIP/TRACTOR

Advertising Agency: TBWA, Costa Rica
Creative Director: Byron Balmaceda
Art Director: Gabriela Soto
Copywriter: Byron Balmaceda
Illustrator: Gabriela Soto
Year: 2011

BRICK Campaign

The ads appeared on four consecutive pages. LEGO is a company that has fostered imagination, invention and creativity for over 60 years. So it is unusual for these ads to feature only long copy with minimal imagery. However, upon reading each of these scenarios the ad comes to life in a way that is unique only to the reader and how they see these playtime scenarios in their mind’s eye. Typographic elements of kerning contrasted with tracking allow the reader to almost get lost in the copy selecting keywords for their imagination. The fourth ad in the series, “Yellow Brick” features a notepad with the tagline “Every LEGO brick tells a story. Build yours.”

Advertising Agency: Pereira & O’Dell, Brazil
Chief Creative Officer: PJ Pereira
Creative Director / Copywriter: Aricio Fortes
Creative Director / Art Director: Paulo Coelho
Account Executive: Lo Braz
Illustrator: Eduardo Gomes
Year: 2012


Levi’s – Creek

Judged even against the impressive stable of Levis commercials dating back to the early 80s, “Creek” is a true thoroughbred.
Ever since Bartle Bogle Hegarty created launderette, its first breakthrough spot for the brand, successive films have transformed the image of Levis as old-fashioned and uncool and made it market leader, creating huge amounts of PR along the way.Creek took the brand back to its roots in 1850s America. Shot in moody black and white, the commercial features what appears to be an Amish family picnicking in a remote spot.
The two daughters drift of to a nearby creek where they see a pair of jeans on a rock while their apparently naked owner bathes. As the soundtrack music reaches a crescendo the man emerges from the water to reveal that he is wearing a pair of jeans and shrinking them to fit. The owner of the jeans turns out to be a scruffy old man.

Agency: BBH, London

Writer: Nick Worthington
Art director: John Gorse
Directors: Vaughan & Anthea
Production company: Lewin & Watson


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,713 other followers