McCann Australia for Metro Trains Melbourne – Is “Dumb Ways To Die” the new “Chipotle”?

Melbourne-Metro-Ad_Dumb-Ways-To-Die-2

dumb_ways_to_die

“Dumb Ways to Die”, is an integrated advertising campaign designed to curb the number of train-related deaths in Victoria. The campaign is centred around a three-minute animated music video, highlighting the many dumb ways there are to die, with being hit by a train – a very preventable death – among them. The video and iTunes single are accessible online at DumbWaysToDie.com, with animated gifs being released on Tumblr, on radio, in posters on small and large space outdoor and throughout the Metro Trains network, with the lyrics to the song on the art work.

tumblr_mdziofGPvR1rchcafo1_1280

The Idea: Safety PSAs are gloomy and tedious and largely ignored by young people hardwired to resist them—except when they’re irresistibly fun and impossible not to share with friends. McCann Australia managed just such an evolution of the genre with “Dumb Ways to Die” its animated train-safety spot for the Melbourne Metro. The three-minute music video shows adorable blobs making the stupidest decisions ever—messing with animals, sticking forks in toasters, eating superglue, etc.—leading to all sorts of gruesome, fatal accidents. The dumbest way to die, the ad suggests at the end, is by being careless around trains. “The idea for a song started from a very simple premise: What if we disguised a worthy safety message inside something that didn’t feel at all like a safety message?” said McCann executive creative director John Mescall. “So we thought about what the complete opposite of a serious safety message would be and came to the conclusion it was an insanely happy and cute song.” With more than 30 million YouTube views, it seems happy, cute and grisly was the way to go.

The Song: The song begins, “Set fire to your hair/Poke a stick at a grizzly bear/Eat medicine that’s out of date/Use your private parts as piranha bait,” before the chorus repeats the two lines, “Dumb ways to die/So many dumb ways to die.” Mescall wrote most of the lyrics in one night at the agency. “It then took a few weeks of finessing,” he said, “getting rid of a few lines that weren’t funny enough and replacing them with new ones.” The line “Sell both your kidneys on the Internet” was a late inclusion. “I’m glad it’s there. It’s my favorite,” he said.

1

Australian musician Ollie McGill from the band The Cat Empire wrote the music. “We basically gave him the lyrics and told him to set it to the catchiest nonadvertising type music he could,” said Mescall. McGill delivered something almost unbearably catchy. “The melody is easy to remember and sing along to, the lyrics are fun, bite-sized chunks of naughtiness, and the vocals have just the right amount of knowing innocence,” Mescall said. “It’s a song that you want to hate for living in your head, but you can’t bring yourself to hate it because it’s also so bloody likable.” The singer is Emily Lubitz of another Australian band, Tinpan Orange. (The song is credited to Tangerine Kitty, which is a mashup of the two band names.) “Emily brought a great combination of innocence, playfulness and vocal integrity,” Mescall said. “She brings a level of vocal quality you don’t normally get on a video about cartoon death.”

The Art Direction: Australian designer Julian Frost did the animation. “We gave him the most open brief we could: Just make it really funny and really awesome and do it to please yourself,” said Mescall. The visual reference points ranged from Edward Gorey’s The Gashlycrumb Tinies to Monty Python’s “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” (which showed men singing while being crucified) to “any number of hokey indie music-video flash mobs you see on YouTube,” said Mescall.

Dumb-Ways-to-Die-2

dumb-ways-to-die-artwork

“Julian was keen to contrast the extreme situations described in the lyrics with the simplest animation possible. Otherwise it would become just too much.” After the spot blew up online, Frost wrote on his website: “Well, the Internet likes dead things waaay more than I expected. Hooray, my childish sense of humor pays off at last.”

DWTD-5
DWTD-6

DWTD-7

DWTD-8

DWTD-9

DWTD-10

metro-dumb-ways-to-die-toaster

The spot lives online, in short bursts on music TV, and may reach cinemas. The campaign is also running in radio, print and outdoor. The song is on iTunes, where it reached the top 10. The agency is also producing a book as well as a smartphone game that should be ready by Christmas.

Advertising Agency: McCann, Melbourne
Executive Creative Director: John Mescall
Creative Team: John Mescall, Pat Baron
Animation: Julian Frost
Digital Team: Huey Groves, Christian Stocker
Year: 2012


Adidas: Adicolor Project – United Colors of adidas

The adicolor podcast is a series of seven short films created for adidas to celebrate “colour, costomization and personal expression”. The films were created to be specifically viewed on iPods, PSPs and online, which was still a fairly revolutionary proposition back in 2006 when the films were made. A team of excellent directors was put together, with Neill Blomkamp, Psyop, Happy, Tronic, Roman Coppola and Andy Bruntel, Saimon Chow and Charlie White each given an entirely open brief to create a film based on their emotional response to a particular colour. The podcasts related to the adicolor global digital campaign for which adidas had asked 20 artists to design a shoe based on their response to a colour. The films feature such surreal scenes as an orgiastic dinner party involving green paintball splashes and a pink-loving teenager’s transformation into a bejewelled figurine. With an original goal of achieving one million views globally, the campaign actually achieved over 25 million views in just seven weeks.

Adicolor BLACK
Stills from Saiman Chow’s film for the colour BLACK. The film is a surreal tale about a lonely, crazed panda.

Adicolor PINK
Charlie White directed the adicolor PINK film, which sees a teenager turn into a bewelled figurine while her pink teddy looks on helplessly.

Adicolor BLUE
Psyop is behind the adicolor blue film, where New York City is turned black and white, apart from the odd splashes of blue.

Adicolor GREEN
Adicolor green by Happy shows a space-age dinner party where everything gets a little out of hand after some green treats are consumed.

Adicolor WHITE
Adicolor WHITE was directed by Tronic and sees Jenna Jameson enthusiastically playing a funfair game.

Adicolor YELLOW
Neil Blomkamp directed the adicolor YELLOW film, a gripping tale about robots and artificial life.

Adicolor RED
Roman Coppola and Andy Bruntel created this animated history of the colour red for the adicolor RED film.

Advertising Agency: Idealogue, New York
Year: 2006


Villarrosas Barcelona for Honda (2007/2008) – The Power of Dreams (Imported from Spain)

Honda Motors – Dreaming about Campaign (2007)

Creative Director: Oriol Villar/Fernando Codina
Illustrator/Typographer: Brosmind
Gold Lion and Silver Lion for the campaign

Honda ACC – Starlings (2007)

Campaign to present the latest technological innovation by Honda, ACC. A system that allows you to keep your distance from the vehicle in front.
Creative Director: Oriol Villar/Fernando Codina
Copywriter: Miguel Angels Alizalde
Production Company: Agosto, Barcelona
Director: Nacho Gayan
Shortlist

Honda CR-V – Landscapeometer (2008)

The idea is to replace the numbers of a odometer with images of landscapes because with the Honda CR-V you don’t cover miles, you experience them.
Creative Director: Oriol Villar/Fernando Codina
Art Director: Michele Salati
Production Company: Agosto, Barcelona
Director: David Ruiz

Honda CR-V – Landscapeometer/Internet Film (2008)

SUVs (Sport Utility Vehicle) are very appreciated by the consumer because of their versatility. However, although their technology has evolved a lot, SUVs are still less efficient on asphalt. Honda engineers designed the new CR-V with the idea to get a SUV with real on-road performance – basically because it is where consumers cover the biggest part of the kilometers.
So the communication objective was to present a car made to enjoy any kind of travel from the beginning till the end and to do it with the specific Honda’s tone of voice: human and passionate. The idea behind this internet commercial is to replace the numbers of a mileometer with images of landscapes because with the Honda CR-V you don’t cover miles, you experience them.
Creative Director: Oriol Villar/Fernando Codina
Art Director: Michele Salati
Production Company: Villarrosas, Barcelona
Director: Brosmind


TBWA/Paris for Amnesty International – Death to the Death Penalty (the story behind the campaign)

On October 10 2010, the fourth European Day Against the Death Penalty, Amnesty International France launched a commercial to mobilise support amongst decision-makers and the general public for its campaign against the death penalty.

The film, created for Amnesty International France by advertising agency TBWA Paris, used life-like wax figures to depict four different methods of execution: firing squad, hanging, beheading and the electric chair. In each scenario, the wax figures melt then crumple – powerfully illustrating the campaign’s strap line: ‘Death to the Death Penalty’.

In a chiaroscuro mood, a firing squad is pointing guns to a prisoner. Characters made out candle wax start to melt down. Then, a hangman is just about to knock down the stool of the prisoner but the rope of the Gallows starts melting down and the scene dissolves. The sword of an executioner and the executioner himself melt down. And eventually, an electric chair meets the same fate. As a reveal, the sentence shaped in candle wax “Death to the death penalty” followed by the very own Amnesty candle logo explain us that Amnesty has put a death spell on the death penalty, that it’s own flame is burning down executioners.

French broadcasters agreed to show the ad at no cost to Amnesty International during an initial run of 30 ad slots. The commercial was then shown in independent cinemas across France for a further four weeks and the creative idea featuring wax figures was also used in accompanying print ads – including posters in Paris – and also direct mail.






The ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ campaign generated significant media coverage and interest both in France and further afield. The commercial was viewed more than 400,000 times online with 30,000 views via the Amnesty International France web site. The advertising has since been used by Amnesty international in more than a dozen other countries – an unusual step as the organisation usually commissions then implements its marketing campaigns locally, market by market.

“We were amazed that support for the work among Amnesty International activists was unanimous – which for us is extremely rare,” says Sylvie Haurat, Communications Director of Amnesty International France.

The Story
Although 96 countries have formally abolished it and many more have not used it in years, 58 nations still actively practice the death penalty. Campaigns for all countries to end capital punishment are ongoing, however, and at a General Assembly meeting in November 2010 the United Nations renewed its call for a moratorium on the death penalty. Ahead of this Amnesty International France, part of global human rights organisation Amnesty International, decided to run a publicity campaign about the issue. France was one of the first countries to formally abolish the death penalty. Amnesty International France wanted to remind the French public that 58 countries were yet to follow their country’s lead, and it hoped France would step up its influence to persuade governments yet to abolish the death penalty to do so.

Amnesty International France is one of 72 national ‘sections’ of Amnesty International, the organisation that campaigns for internationally-recognised human rights for all. Typically, it runs campaigns around three or four different human rights-related issues each year with advertising created and then implemented locally, market by market. Budgets are always very tight so much if not all of the creative development and production work involved is done for free with media space either provided pro bono or at a reduced cost.

We are very demanding client,” Sylvie Haurat says. “Not only do we have very little budget, we are extremely demanding when it comes to our concerns about ethics. And with the cross section of activists working for us, who all have strong opinions, it can be difficult to find campaign ideas on which everyone can agree.” 

In early 2009 Amnesty International France approached TBWA-Paris to develop the death penalty campaign. The organisation had worked with the agency for almost a decade on an ad hoc basis – a relationship that had already produced a number of highly successful campaigns – and the brief was clear.

“Amnesty International already has a worldwide initiative called ‘Count Down for a World Free from Capital Punishment’,” explains Anne-Laure Brunner, TBWA-Paris’ Account Director and Director of New Business. “They gave us the historical background and the Count Down context. They made it clear we needed to mobilise support and to do so by being positive about how close they now are to realising their goal. And they told us to make sure that nothing we produced was directly critical of any particular, individual country.”

A significant feature of the brief – and the TBWA-Paris creative team’s starting point – was how different the death penalty brief was to others for previous Amnesty International campaigns. Unlike most of the other issues Amnesty International campaigns on, the death penalty is a fight that’s close to being won. Because of this, Amnesty International France wanted to do something different to most of our other campaigns – to be more positive. “It was about raising awareness,” says Sylvie Haurat. “And we wanted it to be a message that would appeal to everyone.” 

The Strategy
The agency team’s initial discussions focused on different ways to present the death penalty as outdated and irrelevant – building on insight into the varied and often conflicting ways in which it is used in different countries, and the fact that there is little evidence to suggest capital punishment effectively dissuades others from repeating the same crime. The creative team were concerned that imagery such as an electric chair overgrown by nature might lack impact, however. Attention then turned to Amnesty International’s logo, which features the image of a candle signifying hope out of darkness. Their idea was to use figures of executioners made of wax melting.

“The thought of using wax figures came to us quite quickly because the Amnesty International logo stands for light and hope, and because the melting wax would simply show the time was right to make the death penalty simply melt away,” says TBWA-Paris Art Director Philippe Taroux. “We felt this was a positive way to get the message across – with only a final push in the campaign needed to bring it to its end, it was important to be engaging rather than shocking which people might have felt was alienating.”

Though the creative solution was found early executing it would take almost another 18 months, however. “If you don’t have the money to spend you need time,” Taroux adds. “We began by researching how we could film melting, life-size figures for TV. We approached production collective Pleix who we have worked with many times before to see if we could build and film the figures for real then melt them in post-production. But then we realised how difficult it would be to shoot what we wanted for real.”

Early tests showed it would be too difficult to film melting wax without it looking like stop-motion animation. The logistics involved combined with the limited budget available, meanwhile, meant a more cost effective way to do it was needed that look as realistic as shooting it for real.

“We then began working with post-production company Digital District to find a way to create figures using CG that looked life-size and realistic that we could then melt convincingly,” Taroux continues. “It was really hard as nothing like this had been done before and only in the last week could we be sure what we had was good enough. We ended up pushing the software to the limit on what turned out to be one of the most complicated ads I’ve ever done.” 

So, the figures were sculpted in CG then melted using special software. Facial scans were also used to create extra details on the faces. An important balancing act, however, was ensuring that while realistic the figures did not too closely resemble any particular nationality, Brunner points out: “While we wanted the executioners to be realistic they couldn’t look too like one nationality.” 

Creating the texture of the wax was relatively easy compared to simulating realistic melting. CG software is highly effective for quick water splashes but less suitable for melting more viscous substances very slowly. “Everything had to be really precise – which is always the case to get the best out of 3D,” Taroux adds.  “We drew lot of storyboards to know exactly what we wanted in each shot working closely with the director. We then focused closely on the special effects. Editing was about making sure each of the four ‘stories’ had equal weight.” 

Music choice was another important consideration. “The images were critical, but as important was creating the right ‘climate’ through the sound to provide an emotional dimension,” Taroux explains. The track eventually chosen after months of research was a stirring piece of music called ‘Everyday’ by Carly Comando. “We did not want anything that would over-dramatise the subject. The music was chose had to keep the human dimension – to be stirring and hopeful.”  

Amnesty International France was closely involved throughout the extended development and production process.

“This meant a number of lengthy discussions among our executive committee – about the storyboards, for example,” says Sylvie Haurat. “Because one scene they suggested would show an executioner’s face melting. We had lots of discussions about the ethics of whether Amnesty International could be seen to melt an executioner. This might seem bizarre to an outsider but as I say, we are very demanding. But the idea was strong. And the scene with the melting face is still there.”  

The finished film featured four different vignettes, each depicting a different form of execution: beheading by sword, a practice still used in some Middle East countries; firing squad, still used in China; hanging, used in parts of Asia; and electrocution, practise still used in parts of the US. Each vignette was carefully lit and shot against a simple black background with the audience’s viewpoint guided around the different figures and their equipment as the wax models began to melt.

Though the commercial took almost 18 months to produce the client was closely involved throughout the project. “We have a close relationship and so a strong degree of trust,” says Brunner. “There was much talking around the brief and first concepts as nothing had been done like this before. Then there was more talking around the realisation. Ultimately, however, it all turned out well and no modifications by the client to any of our work at all were made.”

The Impact
Amnesty International France’s ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ campaign launched on October 10 2010, the fourth European Day Against the Death Penalty.  With an extremely limited budget, the campaign needed unpaid media coverage to extend its reach. So ahead of launch, the agency produced CDs and press releases about the campaign to distribute to the media along with scaled down wax models of an electric chair. This generated editorial coverage on four major TV shows and in numerous magazines. The commercial was then shown in French independent cinemas over the next four months.

The ‘Death to the Death Penalty’ film went on to have a significant and far-reaching impact. It generated a large amount of interest at home and abroad and, in the months that followed, the French-produced advertising was used by Amnesty International sections in more than a dozen other countries – a highly unusual move for an organisation where individual markets usually produce and use they own campaign materials, locally.

In the months since, the campaign has won more than two dozen advertising industry awards including a D&AD Yellow Pencil in the Animation category in 2011.

“The campaign’s success is down to the emotional power of the subject and the way it was presented which touched people without over-dramatising,” Brunner believes. “The film is positive and motivating. The technology behind it makes it look real. And the use of wax makes a direct link to the Amnesty candle. It is a perfect combination of pictures, music and message.” 

Sylvie Haurat adds: “The strength of the campaign lay in the quality of the creative concept and its symbolic resonance. The length of time it took to make did cause us problems – we had hoped to run the campaign in October 2009 but it wasn’t ready until a year later. But pro bono work is never straight forward. And we were amazed that support for the work among Amnesty International activists was unanimous – which for us is extremely rare.” 

Advertising Agency: TBWA/Paris
Executive Creative Directors: Eric Holden, Rémi Noël
Copy Writer: Benoît Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Director: Pleix
Production Company: Warm & Fuzzy
Composting: Philippe Aubry, Dan Elhadad, Jimmy Cavé, Guillaume Nadaud, Guillaume Martin
Music: Artist/Song Title: Carly Comando – Everyday


Fred & Farid & Orangina

Orangina – Naturally Juicy (2007)


Anthropomorphism is taken to the max for the fantastical beasts in Naturally Juicy, a surprisingly raunchy spot to promote the fizzy drink Orangina. It aired in France in 2007, the UK in 2008, and has been talked about ever since.
Based on product’s attributes, the natural orange juice and the fizz, the story is about the meeting of a busty sexy deer and a horny bear. We follow them enjoying this naughty world mixing nature and sexiness, furries and craziness. They finally catch each other in a typical hollywood happy ending. Tagline: Naturally Juicy. Commented Todd Mueller, Creative Director/Co-founder, Psyop: “I guess it goes without saying that when you get the opportunity to spray Orangina all over the chest of a sexy bunny girl, you go for it. That was basically the motivation and creative charge throughout the production; raunchy naughty furryness. The agency FFL were amazing to work with and just kept pushing us to get furrier and naughtier. The production team at The Mill and Stink brought everything they had to the table and the results are phenomenal. Now that we are finished, it’s a bit sad to leave this crazy world behind. There’s so much more to find out about this forest and these sexy creatures.”

Its Psyop directors Todd Mueller and Kylie Matulick clearly revel in doing things differently. Mill 3D, led by CGI and Animation supervisor Juan Brockhaus, mapped motion capture data, roughed 3D models and established the timing. You have to admire anyone who can translate human dance moves into those of a ten-foot-tall giraffe or a chorus line of bi-pedal zebras. Details such as fingers and facial expressions were hand-animated, including some major re-animation of the humanised animals.
A tight deadline required some technical hoop-jumping: Mill animators began with unfinished rigs, changed models as they went, while animating over the motion capture. They seamlessly composited CG elements, atmospheric effects and live action. On using the up-to-date motion-captured animatic, compositing supervisor Darren Christie says, ‘On set we used mix and overlay, superimposing animation with live action to get what we needed”

The Making of

Executive Creative Directors: Fred & Farid
Creatives: Michael Zonnenberg, Joseph Dubruque, Nicolas Lautier, Baptiste Clinet
Production Company: Stink / Psyop
Director: Psyop / Todd Mueller & Kylie Matulick
Year: 2007

Print Campaign

Executive Creative Directors: Fred & Farid
Art Supervisors: Feng Huang, Thomas Raillard, Jerome Laan
Art Director: Matthieu Colloud/Nanaë Hassaku/Juliette Lavoix/ Alphée Ballester/Pauline de Montferrand/Olivia Meier/Emmanuelle Durand
Illustrator: Antoine Helbert
Making and Retouching: Julie Poigneau
Year: 2007

Orangina – Giraffa/Hyena (2009)

The Orangina animals is back, but this time they’re a lot less sexy. In a follow up to its sexy animal ad for Orangina Naturally Juicy, Fred & Farid have created two new spots for Orangina Light featuring a giraffe and a hyena in relatively humanised environments. The strap-line reads: “Wickedly Light.”In the first, a giant ‘Giraffe’ in rollerblades and hotpants is seen skating along the beach with two girlfriends when her attention is turned by the sight of a muscular hunk walking passed.  The giraffe quickly alters course, chasing the man down the promenade before biting his bottom.  She then puts him over her shoulder and skates away much to the amusement of her gobsmacked friends.
The second ad features a giant ‘Hyena’ enjoying a drink outside a street cafe with her friends.  When an attractive female passer-by breaks her heel and trips over, the hyena and her pals are sent in to hysterical fits of laughter.  Each spot then closes with the strapline, “Wickedly Light”.

Executive Creative Directors: Fred & Farid
Creatives: Alphee Ballester, Thomas Raillard
Production Company: Big Production
Director: The Terri Timely
Year: 2009

Orangina Variété – Indian/Cowboy (2009)


Creative Directors: Fred and Farid
Directed by Juan Pablo Brockhaus
Produced by The Mill

Orangina Rouge – Panthère (2009)


The new bestial-sado-sexual spot from Fred + Farid Paris for Orangina Red, made with blood oranges. An animated panther-dominatrix chick in a bikini cracks the whip, forcing a pudgy, middle-aged guy to strip down to the Full Monty.

Creative Director : Fred & Farid
Copywriter : Frederic Raillard, Farid Mokart, Florian Bodet, Laurent Leccia, Thomas Raillard
Art Director: Florian Bodet, Laurent Leccia, Thomas Raillard
Post Production : The Mill
Production House : Satellite My Love
Director : Martin Bourboulon

Orangina Cassis & Tropical – Aristo/Rastaman (2010)

Orangina Jaune – Anytime (2010)


The product is so well known in France it does not need to be sold in advertising. Orangina is the only soft drink with 16% of orange juice. 90% of people know the product.  “Anytime” presenting Orangina as the ultimate product for oral, intimate and dental hygiene, taste, sports freshness, laundry linen cleaner and detergent. The creative idea of this film is to parody the traditional advertising and to sell the product for the wrong reasons. It has been so much integrated by the consumers that Orangina was the French’s favourite TV ad after the campaign spread.
The 2010 campaign, following on from the success of the 2007 series, features a giraffe, chameleon, horse, panda, panther, Afghan hound, deer, bear, puma and goat. Naturellement.The campaign won a Gold Film award for Fred & Farid and Gorgeous Enterprises at the 2010 Epica Awards.










The making of

Creative Director : Fred & Farid
Copywriter:Frederic Raillard, Farid Mokart, Florian Bodet, Laurent Leccia, Thomas Raillard
Art Director: Florian Bodet, Laurent Leccia, Thomas Raillard
Production: Gorgeous, London
Post Production: The Mill, London
Director : Tom Carty


Marcel Paris for France 24

France24 International News Chanel – LITTLE BOY/LITTLE GIRL/MONA LISA

A young boy is manufacturing football balls in a sweatshop and starts dreaming he is on a football pitch, being cheered on by the crowd… Before the foreman brings him back to reality.
Speaking enthusiastically, a little girl tells her mum what she has done during the day. But one eventually sees she is speaking to a tombstone in a city that was devastated by war.

Executive Creative Directors: Fred & Farid
Art Directors: Sebastien Piacentini
Copywriters: Gregoire Chalopin
Production Company: WIZZ, Paris, France
Director: Stephane Hamache
Year: 2007

France24 International News Chanel – AFRICA/LEBANON/NUCLEAR

Executive Creative Directors: Fred & Farid
Art Directors: Gregoire Chalopin/Sebastien Piacentini/Tristan Dubois
Copywriters: Gregoire Chalopin/Sebastien Piacentini/Tristan Dubois
Year: 2007

France24 International News Chanel – BEYOND THE NEWS


France 24 goes beyond the news and unveils the machine working behind every important international event.
Creative Directors: Frederic Temin/Anne de Maupeou
Art Director: Dimitri Guerassimov
Copywriter: Eric Jannon
Year: 2007
Silver Lion for the Campaign

France24 Live on iPhone – COUPLE/COPS/SOLDIERS/CRYING WOMAN


Chief Creative Officers: Frederic Temin, Anne De Maupeou
Copywriter: Eric Jannon
Art Directors: Dimitri Guerassimov, Romain Galli
Photographer: Owen Franken/Corbis

France24 on Twitter – BIRDS

We all know the role of social networks and Internet in spreading revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya.Social networks are now an essential source of information, as evidenced by the results obtained by France24, the French international news channel that broadcasts in three languages (French, English and Arabic).
It’s mainly the Arabic language version that broke all audience records during this period. But the channel as a whole has benefited from an increase in audience : in March 2011, france24.com experienced a peak in traffic with nearly 14 million visits and about 59 million page views.
The channel has also been very successful on Twitter thanks to its intense coverage of the Arab Spring, with a large amount of tweets dedicated to the topic, which enabled the channel to quintuple the number of followers of its Twitter account since the beginning of the year.
Based on these exceptional results, France24 and its agency Marcel have decided to highlight the link between freedom of information and freedom of expression on Internet.

Executive Creative Directors: Anne de Maupeou, Veronique Sels, Sebastien Vacherot
Art Directors: Souen Le Van
Copywriters: Martin Rocaboy
Illustrator/Gadhafi: Marie Morency
Illustrator/Mubarak: Souen Le Van
Illustrator/Ben Ali: KIM Florence Lucas
Production Company: Mr Hyde, Paris, France
Director: Philippe Grammaticopoulos
Music/Artist title: Christophe Juli
Year: 2011
Shortlist

France24 International News in Arabic – HU JINTAO/QUEEN/OBAMA/BILL GATES





France 24, the french international news channel, has been broadcasting its programs in the Middle-East for many years. But until recently, only a few were available in arabic. Since October 12th 2010, all France 24 programs are broadcasted in arabic 24/7.
To promote this, we have created a campaign with several movies broadcasted on France 24 as well as several TV channels in the Middle-East targeting opinion leaders.

Executive Creative Directors: Anne de Maupeou, Veronique Sels
Art Directors: Youri Guarasimov
Copywriters: Gaetan Du Peloux
Production Company: WAM, Paris, France
Director: Alexandre Vivet/Gabriel Malaprade
Year: 2011

France24 Live on iPad and iPod – WHITE HOUSE/10 DOWINING STREET/NUCLEAR


Chief Creative Officers: Frederic Temin, Anne De Maupeou, Sebastian Vacherot
Copywriter: Eric Jannon
Art Directors: Dimitri Guerassimov
Photographer: Corbis
Year: 2011


Volkswagen Fox/Short but Fun – Complete Case History



A robbery. A burger. A dance contest. An overdose. A shot in the head. A robbery. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Pulp Fiction” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

A ship, a man, a woman. Ship sinks. Man dead. Woman alive. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Titanic” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

Vacant hotel. Lonesome family, sick father. Psychic power. Bloody ending. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Shining” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

A great white shark. Lots of dead people. A bunch of fearless men. A dead shark. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Jaws” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

An obsessed girl. A priest. An expulsion. A dead priest. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “The Exorcist” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

A space ship. An alien. A nightmare. One survivor.
Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Alien” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

A princess. A dark lord. A Jedi. A death-star. A battle. A happy end. Watch Hollywood’s legendary blockbuster “Starwars” in 30 seconds. Short and fun. Just like the VW Fox.

CASE HISTORY
Question: What do one German mini-car, six Hollywood blockbusters and a fast-talking cast of cartoon bunnies have in common? Answer: They all figured prominently in a wildly original and successful TV advertising campaign that last year earned a Gold World Medal in the International Awards Group’s 2006 Advertising and Marketing Effectiveness (AME) Awards.
The mini-car in question is the Volkswagen Fox, a sporty compact car aimed at youthful, first-time car buyers. The ad campaign, created for Volkswagen AG by DDB Düsseldorf and built around the tagline “Short but Fun,” featured 30-second, animated versions of six international film hits, including Titanic, Jaws and Pulp Fiction. And the bunnies? They took the place of the films’ human characters, adding an element of the outrageously hip to the spots that captivated German audiences during the campaign’s brief, four-day run.
The AME Awards committee, comprised of a multi-cultural and international cross-section of top marketing executives, recognizes integrated marketing campaigns that are fresh, creative and above all, successful.  Campaigns that demonstrate innovative problem solving, and that achieve specific business goals using well-crafted concepts, inspired marketing strategies and an effective combination of traditional and/or alternative media tactics.

Volkswagen’s “Short but Fun” campaign met all these criteria, achieving extraordinary, measurable results for the German car manufacturer that exceeded its campaign objectives and proved it could capture an audience of very critical media users on a very tight production and media budget.

A Clear Objective
Volkswagen introduced the Fox in the spring of 2005 into the price-driven mini-car segment. Despite Volkswagen’s premium image and the Fox being slightly higher priced than the competition, it soon became the market leader.
The launch campaign emphasized the idea that in opting for economy, buyers would not have to compromise quality and reliability. This notion appealed to buyers at all levels, however the next phase of communication would need to sharpen the Fox’s profile among its main target audience: youthful, first time car buyers between the ages of 18-25.

A Moving Target Audience
While highly desirable, this group is the hardest to reach through traditional advertising methods. They have grown up being bombarded by messaging from multiple communication channels and have a very short attention span. If content does not grab them immediately, they turn elsewhere.  DDB faced a formidable challenge in coming up with a strategy to capture their attention and motivate them to action.

Inspired Creative Strategy
“We developed a very creative positioning for the VW Fox: short but fun,” said DDB’s Luis Ramirez.  That’s the message we wanted to communicate: a small car that is fun to drive and does not cost a fortune.  The ideal car for young people.”
The ‘Short but fun” positioning also was developed to differentiate the Fox from its competitors’ cliché lifestyle advertising, which implies that one need only drive a certain car to be more active, attractive and popular. Rather, the ‘Short but fun” messaging conveyed that driving a Fox provides a concentrated, intense form of fun that doesn’t depend on others’ approval; the type of enjoyment that young, upwardly mobile people seek.
In order to illustrate this concept, the agency teamed with artist Jennifer Shiman, whose 30-second, animated versions of cinema classics – starring floppy-eared versions of Hollywood’s A-list – were sure to stop young, media-savvy consumers in their tracks.
“To get this target group excited about the Fox, we created a funny communication platform: http://www.shortbutfun.com,” said Ramirez. “There, site visitors could find a variety of short and fun content, including short films. So we were looking for endlessly long films, told in a very short time.  When we discovered the movies of Jennifer Shiman on the Internet, we realized that they perfectly matched our positioning and had to part of our platform.  We contacted her and discussed a potential cooperation.  She was very excited to work with us. We had to animate and cut the films created by Jennifer so that they matched with the already shot Fox ending. The result: six crazy films, loved by everybody.”
An interesting note: though the commercials appeared only in Germany, they were run in English, in order to speak pointedly to the young target audience.

Innovative Media Strategy
In order to keep media costs down, DDB decided to air the commercials for only four days and make the Internet the main communication channel. This was a risky decision, however the concepts and creative were so strong that DDB felt that viewers would flock to the Fox’s microsite to see more. To ensure that the campaign reached the maximum number of desired audience members, the agency chose a very targeted media strategy, running the commercials on music channels such as MTV, and choosing weekend spots during entertainment shows rather than mid-week spots between shows.
Once on the “Short but fun” web site, viewers could watch all the commercials as movie streams. In order to engage the viewers further, they were asked to rate each commercial. In addition, a banner ad with a link to the Fox product web page was prominently positioned on the home page so that users could learn more about the Fox.

Dazzling Results
The primary, direct communication objective of the “Short but fun” campaign was to generate 20,000 visits to the shortbutfun.com homepage. Within only four days, over 31,000 visits were counted, exceeding the original goal by 56 percent.
The agency also projected the campaign would generate 2,000 email addresses and increase traffic to the Fox product web page by 10 percent.  After four days, over 8,000 users provided their addresses in order to receive more information, and the number of visitors to the web page increased by 37 percent.
Further, qualitative research indicated high recall and positive reactions among viewers, demonstrating that the campaign did indeed achieve its objective of raising the Fox’s profile among young, first time car buyers.

Advertising Agency: DDB Dusseldorf
Creative Director: Jennifer Shinan/Eric Schoeffler
Copywriter: Tim Jacobs
Art Director: Jennifer Shiman/Christian Brenner
Production Company: Angry Alien Productions, Los Angeles
Director: Jennifer Shinan


10 Best Japanese Commercials

1 – Sagami Robber Industries – LONG DISTANCE
Publicising the product benefits of Sagami Original, the world’s thinnest condom at just 0.02 mm. By communicating a “love” theme, we were able to build an aimiable brand image that differed from other competitors. We used a real long distance couple from the entries received and asked them to run a 1000 km marathon.
The goal is for the two to embrace. When they do embrace, the distance between them, that began at 1,000,000,000 mm is now 0 mm..”.. and yet love needs distance”, is inserted, and the distance is pushed back to 0.02 mm. Thus the benefit of the world thinnest condom.
Advertising Agency: GT, Tokyo
Executive Creative Director: Takahisa Mitsumori
Copywriter: Naoki Ito
Art Director: Naoki Ito
Production Company: Rock & Roll, Tokyo
Director: Kan Equchi
Year: 2009
Gold Lion

2 – Nissin Cup Noodles – HUNGRY? Campaign

MOA
A tribe of primitive men in search of food chase a Moa bird. It leads them to the edge of a cliff where the Moa jumps into the air and the men fall over the precipice.
SYNTHETOCERAS
A tribe of primitive men in search of food chase a Synthetoceras into a hole. It repeatedly pops its head up in a different hole, thus exhausting its pursuers.
QUETZALCOATLUS
The primitive men pretend to be Quetzalcoatlus babies and beg for food, but once again they fail.
MAMMOTH

UNITATHERIUM
The primitive men are all over the Unitatherium, like bees on a honeycomb. Will they win at last? Not this time.
GIANT WARTDOG

GIANT SQUID

FISHING
In which a well-known prehistoric family go fishing. Father is let down over a cliff’s edge on a baitless hook … Hungry? Try Nissin Seafood Cup Noodles.
HARVEST
In which our prehistoric family try to get some fruit by beating a tree with a club. Fruit falls down. So does a sabre-toothed tiger … Hungry? Try Nissin Cup Noodles.
SNEAKING THIEF
In which the father of our prehistoric family spies some meat by the sleeping sabre-toothed tiger. But as he tries to grab it, the tiger awakes … Hungry? Try Nissin Cup Noodles.
Advertising Agency: Hakuhodo, Japan
Creative Director: Susumu Miyazaki
Copywriter: Tonomi Maeda
Art Director: Kuzohiro Suda
Production Company: Tohokushinsha Film Corporation
Director: Shinya Nakajima
Year: 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996
Grand Prix/Gold Lion/Silver Lion/Bronze Lion

3 – Morinaga & Co. Carrè de Chocolat - NON-BLINKING WOMAN
We made this commercial to show the appeal of “Carre-de-chocolat”, meltingly velvety authentic chocolate, particularly to married women in their 30s. The concept behind the product is that it can be enjoyed as part of relaxing moments in between their busy household work. The ad was very successful and “Carre-de-chocolat” has become a main brand in the chocolate category, even though it was a generic product.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yoshiro Sato
Copywriter: Makoto Shinohara/Tsunao Arita
Production Company: Mothers, Tokyo
Director: Jun Kawanishi
Year: 2008
Bronze Lion

4 – Toyota – HUMANITY
The film takes the form of a simple flowing narrative drive of a Toyota car through an urban/suburban environment. Whilst the film takes an elegant and traditional filmic approach in its portrayal of the car and its surroundings, various details and features of the Toyota range cars are depicted with a more bizarre twist. Instead of seeing the exact technical nature of the design features of the car, each item is depicted in a much more personal way using human “experts” to represent the function on show.
Advertising Agency: Hakuhodo, Tokyo
Creative Director: Hideyuki Tanno/Tetsuya Tokimatsu/Masahiko Ishii
Copywriter: Tetsuya Tokimatsu
Art Director: Hideyuki Tanno
Production Company: Stink, London
Director: Ne-o
Year: 2006
Silver Lion

5 – Champagne Nicolas Feullatte – TOAST MEN
In this commercial for Champagne Nicolas Feuillatte, scientists search for stronger glasses with which to give toasts. On behalf of Nihon Shurui Hanbai, we wanted to say to everyone, “many cheers!”
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yoshimitsu Sawamoto
Copywriter: Mayu Taguchi/Sohei Okano/Yuriko Taki
Art Director: Hideyuki Tanno
Production Company: Dentsu Creative X, Tokyo
Director: Jun Kawanishi
Year: 2011
Bronze Lion


6 – Nike – NIKE MUSIC SHOE

Nike launched NIKE FREE RUN+, the new addition to the NIKE FREE footwear line in late March 2010. The main communications campaign conveyed the new model’s incredible flexibility with the tagline “Free like feet want to be”. Nike Japan further wanted to develop an idea that creates buzz about the shoe’s flexibility and NIKE+ compatibility. The idea was the NIKE MUSIC SHOE. Why not make a real musical instrument utilising the shoe’s unique bending features and create a soundtrack with it? The music performance was commissioned to breakbeats unit HIFANA, who collaborated in the creation of the instruments and also wrote the song.
Advertising Agency: Wieden+Kennedy, Tokyo
Creative Director: Frank Hahn/Naoki Ito
Copywriter: Hiroshi Kuyama/Takayuki Rokutan
Art Director: Shingo Ohno/Naoki Ga
Production Company: Taiyo Kikaku, Tokyo
Director: Kosai Sekine
Year: 2010
Bronze Lion

7 – Secam Home Security – THE BIG TEST
SECOM Home Security Service offers various individualised services, and closely watches over the safety and security of their customers 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. In this commercial, we showed the importance of having a security system by highlighting the fact that not everyone can resist the temptations right in front of them.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Hiroshi Sasaki
Copywriter: Yoshimitsu Sawamoto
Art Director: Naoki Ito
Production Company: Geek Picture, Tokyo
Director: Akira Nagai
Year: 2008
Silver Lion

8 – Panasonic Oxyride Battery – MANNED FLIGHT
Powering a plain with household batteries.
Advertising Agency: Hakuhodo, Tokyo
Creative Director: Katsunori Tsuyama/Satoru Yokoyama/Toshikazu Ieda
Copywriter: Toshiya Inoue/Kan Ishii/Kosuke Masuda
Production Company: Hat, Tokyo
Director: Kaoru Yamaguchi
Year: 2007
Bronze Lion


9 –
Ajinomoto Stadium – HUSKY GIRLS

A young man has moved to a new town. He finds all the women there very beautiful, but their voices are hideously hoarse from cheering.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yuya Furukama
Copywriter: Hiroyo Kanehako
Art Director: Hiroyo Kanehako
Production Company: Dentsu TEC, Tokyo
Director: Jun Kawanishi
Year: 2005
Silver Lion


10 – Esthe Wam Hair Removal – BEAUTY BOWLING
For women, being beautiful is about keeping challenging themselves. This ad shows the tragedy of a woman at a beauty championship who failed to take care of herself. It expresses how one single hair can divide the winner and the loser by using the game of bowling by communicating that their body would be perfect with Esthe WAM because they offer professional care during and after the treatment.
Advertising Agency: Dentsu, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yuya Furukawa
Copywriter: Moto Takagi
Art Director: Masahide Yoshimi
Production Company: Tohokushinsha Film Corporation, Tokyo
Director: Masahiro Takata
Year: 2005
Bronze Lion




TBWA/Paris for Playstation (2003/2007) – Five years of amazing works

TITLE: Rebirth
The print work called “Rebirth” that shows the head of a grown man emerging from the womb of a svelte model has won the International Advertising Festival’s Press & Poster Grand Prix award as the year’s best print ad. “Rebirth” was originally selected as the winner in the outdoor category in Monday’s Press and Poster jury deliberations but was then switched to print after the original print winner was disqualified.
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: Jorge Carreno
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2003
Grand Prix in Press Lions

TITLE: Veteran
The ad campaign titled “Veterans”  depicts the boys with otherworldly looks who have gone through untold battles, blood and death.
“The success of the PlayStation shots depends on a subtle blend of lighting, tone and the expressions on the faces of the players… when Jorge Carreno, the art director at TBWA\Paris, approached me with the idea of war veterans that were actually kids, I knew it could be something special. Good ideas bring out your best work.” – Marc Gouby, photographer
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: Jorge Carreno
Photographer: Marc Gouby
Year: 2003
Silver Lion for the campaign

TITLE: Supermarket

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eric Helias
Art Director: Jorge Carreno
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2003
Bronze Lion

TITLE: Doll

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Gold Lion

TITLE: Potato Head

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Manoelle Van Der Vaeren
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Gold Lion

TITLE: Dressing up

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Shortlist

TITLE: Kamasutra

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Estelle Nollet
Art Director: Loic Cardon
Artist: Richard N’go
Year: 2004
Bronze Lion

TITLE: Heart of Stone

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Shortlist

TITLE: Skin Shell

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Shortlist

TITLE: Choice

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Eve Roussou/Oliver Renaud
Art Director: Eve Roussou/Oliver Renaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2004
Shortlist

TITLE: Adultery
“I can’t even remember how many layers there were in this image. The final file was about 3GB,” says the photographer. He adds, “When using a digital camera you have to shoot quite flat, then increase the contrast in Photoshop.” – Dimitri Daniloff, photographer
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Moulds

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Manoelle Van Der Vaeren
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Plugs

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Matthew Branning
Art Director: Chris Garbut
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Scars

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Guillaume Ulrich Chifflot
Art Director: Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Baby

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Xander Smith
Art Director: Javier Rodriguez
Photographer: Yann Robert
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Sleeping Beauty

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Photographer: Eugenio Recuenco
Year: 2005
Gold Lion

TITLE: Banana

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Alain Jalabert
Art Director: Thierry Buriez
Photographer: Vincent Dixon
Year: 2005
Shortlist

TITLE: Octopus

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2005
Shortlist

TITLE: Death

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Photographer: Marjolijn de Groot
Year: 2005
Shortlist

TITLE: Head
The fantastic and virtual universe of Playstation is revealed to readers by giving them a glimpse into what exactly goes on inside a player’s head.
Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Sebastien Vacherot/Jessica Jerard- Huet/Loic Cardon/Ingrid Varetz
Art Director: Sebastien Vacherot/Jessica Jerard- Huet/Loic Cardon/Ingrid Varetz
Photographer: Yann Robert
Production Company: DEF 2 Shoot, Paris
Director: Thomas Marque
Year: 2006
Gold Lion for the press

TITLE: Spring

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Daniel Perez/Xander Smith/Matthew Branning
Art Director: Eve Roussou/Emmanuel Courteau/Cedric Moutaud
Photographer: Marc de Cunha Lopez
Year: 2006
Shorlist

TITLE: Bodies

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Ghislaine de Germon
Art Director: Mariene Fonferrier
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2006
Shorlist

TITLE: Panties


Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Xander Smith
Art Director: Bjoern Ruehmann/Joakim Reveman
Photographer: Hans Starck
Year: 2006
Shortlist

TITLE: Flasher

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Photographer: Dimitri Daniloff
Year: 2006

TITLE: Insect

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Veronique Sels
Art Director: Eve Roussou/Viken Guzel
Photographer: Matthieu Deluc
Year: 2007

TITLE: Clown

Creative Director: Erik Vervroegen
Copywriter: Benoit Leroux
Art Director: Philippe Taroux
Graphic Designer: Thomas Mangold
Year: 2007


Evian – WaterBoy

Waterboy, a little character made of water, goes through various situations symbolising the element of water. On his adventures, he meets a gorgeous girlfriend who is also made of water. Together, they start a family.

SUMMARY
In order to sustain Evian’s premium price in a commoditized market, Evian’s “We will rock you” campaign adopted a whole new advertising approach: no longer consider Evian to be just a water brand, following the rules of the category, but change the brand’s status and transform it into a badge of youthfulness. To achieve this goal, the campaign went beyond advertising, conceiving a global “advertainment” in which adults singing a mythical song with children’s voices were the basis for a global entertainment program. Despite a modest advertising budget the campaign succeeded in reaching all of the goals set and achieving considerable market share gain.

CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVES
Add value to the brand by claiming a specific and motivating benefit which justifies Evian’s premium price and thus helps stabilise Evian’s market share.

CREATIVE STRATEGY
The strategy was to transform Evian into a “Badge of Youthfulness”. Youth is one of the strongest consumer aspirations, an aspiration that drives added value in most markets. An international TV commercial was launched, “Voices” : the revival of “We will rock you” by Queen, sung by adults with children’s voices expressing the inner youth inside us all and connecting Evian with a young spirit and powerful energy. This served to show that drinking Evian every day helps people feel young in body and mind.

RESULTS
– The campaign successfully changed the brand perception and increased the brand value. In France, Belgium and the UK substantial progress was achieved on all youthfulness indicators, as well as on price perception.
– Beyond the objective of stabilising market share, significant market share was gained in all markets, the UK for instance seeing a 3.5% volume share increase over the year.
– The ad itself was welcomed positively by the audience, achieving likeability scores 11% above the norm.
– Substantial free media coverage was gnerated with the launch of the “We will rock you” single and through radio broadcasting of the song.
– The campaign became a “social phenomenon”, especially in France.

Agency: BETC Euro RSCG
Creative Director Rémi Babinet/Fabrice Brovelli
Art Director: Sophie Deiss/Jean-Christophe Saurel
Copywriter: Sophie Deiss/Jean-Christophe Saurel
Director: Soandsau
Production Company: Quad Prodoctions, Paris


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,658 other followers