Jung von Matt for Pro Infirmis – Who is perfect, anyway?

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A Swiss charity has created mannequins based on the bodies of disabled people in a bid to raise awareness that no one has a perfect body. Pro Infirmis, an organisation for people with disabilities, worked with people suffering from scoliosis (a curved spine), shortened limbs and a woman in a wheelchair. Each had a mannequin made to perfectly reflect their body shape – which, to their delight, was then displayed in a high street store in Zurich’s main shopping street.

A Swiss charity has created mannequins based on the bodies of disabled people in a bid to raise awareness that no one has a perfect body

Each person had a mannequin made to perfectly reflect their body shape

The project was devised to mark the International Day of Persons with Disabilities this week. Called ‘Because who is perfect? Get closer’, the story is captured in a moving four-minute film directed by Alain Gsponer. The film follows four volunteers who enter a warehouse with trepidation. The models are radio host and film critic Alex Oberholzer, Miss Handicap 2010 Jasmine Rechsteiner, athlete Urs Kolly, actor Erwin Aljukić and blogger Nadja Schmid. The film captures the emotional moment each person sees their unique sculpture – and reveals the internal struggle some of those involved have accepting their appearance. Viewers then see the mannequins carefully dressed and placed in the front window in a shop on Bahnhofstrasse, Zurich’s main downtown street. Dave Thomas Junior contributed the music for the new work. The piece Lost at Sea was newly arranged specially for the Pro Infirmis film.

One model said: “Seeing it there for real is quite a shock. This, says the charity Pro Infirmis, is the point of the campaign. It hopes to raise awareness of people with disabilities, specifically in the image-obsessed worlds of fashion and retail. Upon seeing her mannequin, one woman declares: ‘It’s special to see yourself like this, when you usually can’t look at yourself in the mirror”.

The project was devised to mark the International Day of Persons with Disabilities this week
Called 'Because who is perfect? Get closer,' the story is captured in a moving four-minute film directed by Alain Gsponer
The film follows four volunteers who enter a warehouse with trepidation. They include actor Erwin Aljuki¿ (pictured)
Each is measured before mannequins are painstakingly crafted to mirror their bodies
Upon seeing her mannequin, one woman declares: 'It's special to see yourself like this, when you usually can't look at yourself in the mirror'
The aim of the project is to raise awareness of people with disabilities, specifically in the image-obsessed worlds of fashion and retail
Viewers then see the mannequins carefully dressed and placed in the front window in a shop on Bahnhofstrasse, Zurich's main downtown street
Far from the tall, curve free models seen world wide, passers-by see a a woman with a curved spine, or a man or woman in a wheelchair

Advertising Agency: Jung von Matt/Limmat, Zurich, Switzerland
Executive Creative Director: Alexander Jaggy
Art Director: Daniel Serrano
Copywriter: Samuel Wicki, Mateo Sacchetti
Graphic Designer: Lukas Frischknecht
Year: 2013


The throne awaits you, the adverts don’t… (Royal Baby in advertising)

Within hours of the announcement the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge had welcomed their baby boy into the world on Monday, a raft of companies took to Twitter advertising their brand along with cute messages of congratulation…

Carling Beer

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Advertising agency: Creature, London
Year: 2013

Pampers

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The diaper maker tweeted out a video stuffed with heart-tugging shots of babies under this headline: Every Little Baby is a Prince or Princess.

The Sun

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Advertising agency: Grey London
Executive Creative Director: Nils Leonard
Creative Director: Dave Monk
Creative Team: Dominic Butler & Jasper Cho

Year: 2013

The Times

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Advertising agency: Grey London
Executive Creative Director: Nils Leonard
Creative Director: Dave Monk
Creative Team: Dominic Butler & Jasper Cho

Year: 2013

Coca-Cola

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The cola giant tweeted out a photo of two toasting Coke bottles, one labeled Wills and the other labeled Kate. The tweet read, “Time for a royal celebration.”

Warburtons

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Advertising agency: WCRS, London
Copywriter: Steve Hawthorne
Art Director: Katy Hopkins
Creative Director: Billy Faithfull
Year: 2013

Johnson & Johnson

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The baby products maker tweeted out a photo of a baby in a bathtub wearing an apparent crown made from baby shampoo bubbles. It also plans to run a print ad in People magazine featuring a baby’s hand holding onto a mother’s finger under the headline: “A parent’s love is the same the world over.”

Oreo

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The cookie brand tweeted out a simple photo: An Oreo and milk-filled baby bottle sitting atop a very royal-looking, plush, velvet cushion. The tweet offers this: “Prepare the royal bottle service!”

Play-Doh

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Magnum

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Starbucks

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Delta Airlines

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Air New Zealand

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Diet Coke

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OXO

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Sony Pictures

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Nintendo

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Lego

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MINI

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Vegas

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Nescafé

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CoorDown – #DammiPiùVoce (Saatchi & Saatchi Italy strikes back)

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Background
In Italy, due to prejudice, the basic rights of people with Down syndrome are still too often denied. With more funds available it would be possible to defend their rights.

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Idea
On launch day, on the site CoorDown.it, 50 people with Down Syndrome each appeared on video appealing to 50 celebrities for a donation. But not of money: they asked them to donate a video. A video in which they, the celebrities, asked for the money to support people with Down syndrome, amplifying their voices. A video, which if then shared via the celebrities’ social networks, would have more chance of being listened to.

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Spartaco & Jovanotti

Andrea & Sharon Stone

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZBpAkceijU

Federico & Castrogiovanni

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Results

50 out of 50 celebrities donated a video and shared it on their social networks, including the singers Tiziano Ferro andJovanotti; the footballers TottiMaterazzi and Zanetti; the rugby player Castrogiovanni; the star chef Carlo Cracco; the Real Madrid coach Jose Mourinho and the actress Sharon Stone.
Thanks to the social networks shares and all the media coverage, the campaign reached almost 30 million people, half of the italian population. And donations were up 700%, compared to Coordown’s previous fundraising campaign.

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, Italy
Creative Directors: Alessandro Orlandi, Luca Lorenzini, Luca Pannese
Art Director: Luca Pannese
Copywriter: Luca Lorenzini
Social Network specialist: Flavia Pipola
Head of Interactive Production: Silvio Coco
Web Developer: Dario Cataldi
Producer: Erica Lora-Lamia
Head of TV: Raffaella Scarpetti
Editor: Fulvio Rossetti
Social Media Partner: Ambito 5
Website development: Logicweb
Partners: Top Digital, Flipper Music, Luca Bottale, H-Films, Getty Images, Google, Akita
Year: 2013


Haddon Sundblom for Coca-Cola – The Man Who Painted Christmas

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Though he was not the first artist to create an image of Santa Claus for Coca-Cola advertising, Haddon Sundblom’s version became the standard for other Santa renditions and is the most-enduring and widespread depiction of the holiday icon to this day. Coca-Cola’s Santa artworks would change the world’s perception of the North Pole’s most-famous resident forever and would be adopted by people around the world as the popular image of Santa.

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In the 1920s, The Coca-Cola Company began to promote soft drink consumption for the winter holidays in U.S. magazines. The first Santa ads for Coke used a strict-looking Claus. In 1930, a Coca-Cola advertised with a painting by Fred Mizen, showing a department store Santa impersonator drinking a bottle of Coke amid a crowd of shoppers and their children.
Not long after, a magical transformation took place. Archie Lee, then the agency advertising executive for The Coca-Cola Company, wanted the next campaign to show a wholesome Santa as both realistic and symbolic. In 1931, the Company commissioned Haddon Sundblom, a Michigan-born illustrator and already a creative giant in the industry, to develop advertising images using Santa Claus. Sundblom envisioned this merry gentleman as an opposite of the meager look of department store Santa imitators from early 20th century America.

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Sundblom turned to Clement Moore’s classic poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” (better known as “’Twas the Night Before Christmas”) for inspiration:

His eyes — how they twinkled! His dimples: how merry,
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry;
His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow

The ode’s description of the jolly old elf inspired Sundblom to create an image of Santa that was friendly, warm and human, a big change from the sometimes-harsh portrayals of Santa up to that time. He painted a perfectly lovable patron saint of the season, with a white beard flowing over a long red coat generously outlined with fur, an enormous brass buckle fastening a broad leather belt, and large, floppy boots.

Sundblom’s Santa was very different from the other Santa artworks: he radiated warmth, reminded people of their favorite grandfather, a friendly man who lived life to the fullest, loved children, enjoyed a little honest mischief, and feasted on snacks left out for him each Christmas Eve . Coca-Cola’s Christmas campaign featuring this captivating Santa ran year after year.

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As distribution of Coca-Cola and its ads spread farther around the world, Sundblom’s Santa Claus became more memorable each season, in more and more countries. The character became so likable, The Coca-Cola Company and Haddon Sundblom struck a partnership that would last for decades. Over a span of 33 years, Haddon Sundblom painted imaginative versions of the “Coca-Cola Santa Claus” for for Coke advertising, retail displays and posters.

Sundblom initially modeled Santa’s smiling face after the cheerful looks of a friend, retired salesman Lou Prentiss. “He embodied all the features and spirit of Santa Claus,” Sundblom said. “The wrinkles in his face were happy wrinkles.” After Prentiss passed away, the Swedish-American Sundblom used his own face as the ongoing reference for painting the now-enduring, modern image of Santa Claus.

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In 1951, Sundblom captured the Coca-Cola Santa “making his list and checking it twice.” However, the ads did not acknowledge that bad children existed and showed pages of good boys and girls only. Mischievous and magical, the Coca-Cola Santa was not above raiding the refrigerator during his annual rounds, stealing a playful moment with excited children and pets, or pausing to enjoy a Coca-Cola during stops on his one-night, worldwide trek. When air adventures became popular, Santa also could be caught playing with a toy helicopter around the tree.

Haddon Sundblom's santa

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Haddon Sundblom passed away in 1976, but The Coca-Cola Company continues to use a variety of his timeless depictions of Saint Nicholas in holiday advertising, packaging and other promotional activities. The classic Coca-Cola Santa images created by Sundblom are as ubiquitous today as the character they represent and have become universally accepted as the personification of the patron saint of both children and Christmas.

As Joanna Berry, Lecturer in Marketing at Newcastle University Business School, explains: “Whilst Sundblom didn’t invent Santa as the jolly, white haired rotund old man we all now expect, he certainly did more than anyone to imprint that image onto our minds in relation to Coca-Cola in one of the most enduring brand images ever to have been created.”

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A tribute to Haddon Sundblom from “Coke Side of Life” Campaign

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Nike – The Chain (the World’s Longest User Generated Video)

The Chain is the world’s longest user generated football video and is edited together from user submissions. The Chain is a feast of homebrewed football moves from all corners of the globe, with one user passing the ball to the next. The brand moves from being a speaker to being a facilitator of the message of the global movement for beautiful football. The consumers become the voice.

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The Chain campaign was kicked off – literally – by Ronaldinho. The football star was filmed kicking a ball out of the camera frame, and then viewers were encouraged to filmed the following link in the chain. The rules were very simple: the ball must enter from the left and exit to the right. Beyond this the participants could show off thei footballing skills any way they liked. Over 40.000 films were uploaded to the website, with 2.000 of those selected for use in The Chain, a two-hour football video that has been viewed by more than 20 million people.

Advertising Agency: FramFab Denmark, Copenhagen
Creative Director: Lars Cortsen
Copywriter: Thomas Robson
Art Director: Rasmus Frandsen
Designer: Kristian Groove Møller
Interactive Designer: Kristian Groove Moller, Martin Mohr
Programmer: Martin Ludvigsen
Technical Director: Jesper Arvidson
Producer: Simon Ryhede/Michael Amsinck
Year: 2006
GOLD LION (2006, Cannes International Advertising Festival)
GOLD (2006, London International Awards)
GOLD (2006, Epica – Europes premier creative awards) ,
GRANDPRIX (2006, Eurobest Awards),
GOLD (2007, The One Show),
GOLD (2007, CLIO, “Fresh Approach”), SILVER (2007, CLIO, “Brand Building”),
NOMINATION (2007, D&AD Awards”)


BBC – Attenborough’s Wonderful World

One year ago, following the final episode of the Attenborough-narrated cold-climes series Frozen Planet, the BBC aired a two-minute trailer subtly celebrating the 60-odd years that the iconic TV personality has spent working on non-fiction programming for the network. Visually, the spot, from ad agency RKCR/Y&R, doesn’t deviate far from the staple shots of most natural science shows. Brightly colored birds, time lapses of blooming flowers, panoramas of majestic terrain, and pensive baboons all make their obligatory appearances. How can you not love this? It’s surprising and clever, yet also dignified. The only words in it are from the song ” What a Wonderful World” written by Bob Thiele and George David Weiss, and of course made famous by Louie Armstrong. This works so well because Attenborough speaks the lyrics—pleasant platitudes that we’ve almost stopped noticing, as the song has become audio wallpaper—in his signature cadence of wonder and delight. This renews our appreciation both of the song, and the power of Attenborough’s delivery. And of course, it’s all done to support stunning footage of nature, nicely edited with subtle sound effects to match the pictures. More than the sum of its parts. “It’s a wonderful world, watch it with us,” reads the BBC trailer’s tagline. Fantastic.

Advertising Agency: RKCR/Y&R, UK
Executive Creative Director: Mark Roalfe
Creatives: Ted Heath, Paul Angus


Freddy Krueger (and Nightmare on Elm Street) in advertising

Yamaha

Burger King/Open Late

Picasso (Bed & Mattresses)

GSC/Developers against Piracy

Horror Night at Playcenter

Nulaid Eggs

Screamfest (Independent Horor Film Festival)

Post-it notes

Fonzies Chips

MTV/Nightmare on Elm Street Campaign

During some ads for America’s Best Dance Crew, Freddy Krueger comes out of nowhere and interrupts them as a way to advertise A Nightmare on Elm Street.

Direct TV


McDonald’s Canada – Our Food. Your Questions.

After fielding roughly 6,000 questions online about its food, McDonald’s Canada is taking the conversation “offline” with a new advertising campaign.

In June, McDonald’s Canada launched an interactive digital platform, “Our Food. Your Questions.” in an effort to be more transparent with consumers about where its food comes from and how it’s made. Consumers asked everything from calorie counts of certain menu items to why McDonald’s burgers and fries don’t rot when left out for a long period of time.

McDonald’s has now launched an integrated advertising campaign to reach even more Canadians and invite them to join the conversation online.

“The initial success of the program is a real testament to the power of creating meaningful and open dialogue with customers,” said Joel Yashinsky, chief marketing officer at McDonald’s Canada. “This level of transparency has resonated with our guests and has created the type of conversation we want to have with them about our food. We’re excited to see how far it can go.”

The campaign from Tribal DDB Toronto includes television, digital and various outdoor media. Since its inception the company’s response team has covered almost 6,000 questions at the site.  Answers have been posted using text, photos and video.

“The program exceeded all our expectations and we learned from customer feedback that this is an important opportunity for us to continue and evolve the dialogue with our customers,” said Joel Yashinsky, chief marketing officer at Toronto-based McDonald’s Canada. “We wanted to broaden it so that the reach allowed all customers in Canada to be aware of the program and ask any questions they had about our food.”

The TV spot shows questions from the website with behind-the-scenes shots from McDonald’s operations, for example a burger getting prepped for a photo shoot after the question, “Why does your food look different in the advertising than what’s in store?” Meanwhile, video projections on buildings in urban centres will feature select questions and answers–some still and some full-motion with answers that were done on video. “It will [give] a surprise to people in those areas to see the projection of these questions that are very provocative and raise the awareness of the program,” said Yashinsky. Yashinsky said the platform “is going to run forever… We think this is a great two-way conversation for us to have with our customers that we don’t want to end.”

How McDonald’s Canada Makes their World Famous Fries

Did you know that McDonald’s World Famous Fries are made from whole potatoes harvested mainly from farms in New Brunswick, Alberta, and Manitoba? Watch and see exactly how our fries get made, from the farm to the fryer.

“What is in the sauce that is in the Big Mac?”

Christine H. from Oshawa asked, “What is in the sauce that is in the Big Mac?”

Where McDonald’s Canada Gets Our Hamburger Patties From

You’ve probably heard that every McDonald’s Canada hamburger patty is made with 100% pure Canadian beef. But what does that really mean? To find out, we visited Cargill’s processing plant in northern Alberta to give you an all-access look at exactly what our hamburger patties are made from and how they get made.

“Why don’t you guys grill the patties? Better than microwaves!”

“Why don’t you guys grill the patties? Better than microwaves!” Jeffry B. from Oshawa asked. McDonald’s Canada Manager of National Operations Drew Sadler answered.

Is 100% pure beef the name of a company?

“Is your beef actually 100% pure beef or is that just the name of the company?” That’s what John R., from Toronto asked. Our answer: a corporate title search to see if the company actually exists.

Behind the scenes at a McDonald’s photo shoot

Isabel M from Toronto asked “Why does your food look different in the advertising than what is in the store?”

The McNugget under the microscope

Sheri N. from Saskatoon asked, “Is the thing about the Chicken McNuggets true? They are made from a processed pink sludge of meat and bones ground up with chemicals?”

Real Egg Crackdown

“Does your Egg McMuffin use real eggs? They look to perfect” To answer this question our Crew Members were brought in to prove that McDonald’s® Canada uses real freshly cracked Canada Grade A eggs so often, they’ve got skills.

“Why is the food at McDonald’s so cheap?”

“Why is the food at mcdonalds so cheap?” Joanne S., from Toronto asked. McDonald’s Canada President and CEO John Betts answered.

Advertising Agency: Tribal DDB, Toronto, Canada
Creative Director: Louis-Philippe Tremblay
Copywriter:Ryan Lawrence
Art Director:Benson Ngo
Agency Producer: Melanie Lambertsen
Account Director: Miles Savage
Production Company: Family Style
Directors: John Weyman, Torey Kohara
Line Producer: Liz Dussault
Post-Production Company: School – Various
Editor: School – Various
Audio House: RNW
Talent: Real People (McDonald’s Employees, suppliers)


Adidas: Adicolor Project – United Colors of adidas

The adicolor podcast is a series of seven short films created for adidas to celebrate “colour, costomization and personal expression”. The films were created to be specifically viewed on iPods, PSPs and online, which was still a fairly revolutionary proposition back in 2006 when the films were made. A team of excellent directors was put together, with Neill Blomkamp, Psyop, Happy, Tronic, Roman Coppola and Andy Bruntel, Saimon Chow and Charlie White each given an entirely open brief to create a film based on their emotional response to a particular colour. The podcasts related to the adicolor global digital campaign for which adidas had asked 20 artists to design a shoe based on their response to a colour. The films feature such surreal scenes as an orgiastic dinner party involving green paintball splashes and a pink-loving teenager’s transformation into a bejewelled figurine. With an original goal of achieving one million views globally, the campaign actually achieved over 25 million views in just seven weeks.

Adicolor BLACK
Stills from Saiman Chow’s film for the colour BLACK. The film is a surreal tale about a lonely, crazed panda.

Adicolor PINK
Charlie White directed the adicolor PINK film, which sees a teenager turn into a bewelled figurine while her pink teddy looks on helplessly.

Adicolor BLUE
Psyop is behind the adicolor blue film, where New York City is turned black and white, apart from the odd splashes of blue.

Adicolor GREEN
Adicolor green by Happy shows a space-age dinner party where everything gets a little out of hand after some green treats are consumed.

Adicolor WHITE
Adicolor WHITE was directed by Tronic and sees Jenna Jameson enthusiastically playing a funfair game.

Adicolor YELLOW
Neil Blomkamp directed the adicolor YELLOW film, a gripping tale about robots and artificial life.

Adicolor RED
Roman Coppola and Andy Bruntel created this animated history of the colour red for the adicolor RED film.

Advertising Agency: Idealogue, New York
Year: 2006


Red Bull and Felix Baumgartner – The Next “Gold Lion for Special Events and Stunt/Live Advertising”

In October of 2012, Felix Baumgartner will attempt a record-breaking freefall jump from 120,000 feet – 23 miles – above the earth as part of Red Bull Stratos: a mission to the edge of space. The attempt will take place near Roswell, NM, USA, and if successful, Felix Baumgartner could be the first person to break the speed of sound with his own body, protected only by a space suit. As no one has successfully jumped from this height before, it’s uncertain what the highest supersonic freefall in history will look or feel like.


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