Leo Burnett Italy for WWF: Pets4Pets Project – Advertising thought by kids to get adults thinking

What about asking youngsters, instead of experienced creative directors, to create the strongest communication campaigns?

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Pets4Pets Project  taught little kids the secrets of the advertising industry; inviting them to imagine new social campaigns to help protect the animals they love the most. WWF, together with a team of creatives, photographers, illustrators, film directors, animators, post-producers and speakers helped students at an elementary school experience the whole creative process: from the brief, to the Pre Production Meeting, to the shooting, to going on-air. The result? Well see for yourself in the case video.

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The adventure starts in the classroom, then moves inside the creative agency and finally arrives on a production set. For all the experienced creatives there’s just one strict rule: “never ‘contaminate’ the kids’ ideas”, just offer them the production advice they lack. First Challenge: a print campaign.

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Second Challenge: a TV commercial.

The results

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“From the first sketch on a piece of paper, to 2 TV commercials, 4 radio announcements and 8 print campaigns, ready to go on-air”. For every creative piece, you can see the “before” and “after”: from the kids’ original sketches to the final executions ready to go on-air. One thing is immediately evident: the kids’ work is already 100% creatively effective.
The team of professionals just helped them “translate” their ideas into a language that adults can understand.

Advertising Agency: Leo Burnett Italy
Executive Creative Director: Francesco Bozza
Associate Creative Director: Andrea Marzagalli
Creative Team: Andrea Stanich, Sergio Spaccavento, Paolo Boccardi, Alice Crippa, Serena Micieli, Silvia Savoia
Executive Producer: Debora Magnavacca
Year: 2013


The throne awaits you, the adverts don’t… (Royal Baby in advertising)

Within hours of the announcement the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge had welcomed their baby boy into the world on Monday, a raft of companies took to Twitter advertising their brand along with cute messages of congratulation…

Carling Beer

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Advertising agency: Creature, London
Year: 2013

Pampers

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The diaper maker tweeted out a video stuffed with heart-tugging shots of babies under this headline: Every Little Baby is a Prince or Princess.

The Sun

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Advertising agency: Grey London
Executive Creative Director: Nils Leonard
Creative Director: Dave Monk
Creative Team: Dominic Butler & Jasper Cho

Year: 2013

The Times

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Advertising agency: Grey London
Executive Creative Director: Nils Leonard
Creative Director: Dave Monk
Creative Team: Dominic Butler & Jasper Cho

Year: 2013

Coca-Cola

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The cola giant tweeted out a photo of two toasting Coke bottles, one labeled Wills and the other labeled Kate. The tweet read, “Time for a royal celebration.”

Warburtons

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Advertising agency: WCRS, London
Copywriter: Steve Hawthorne
Art Director: Katy Hopkins
Creative Director: Billy Faithfull
Year: 2013

Johnson & Johnson

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The baby products maker tweeted out a photo of a baby in a bathtub wearing an apparent crown made from baby shampoo bubbles. It also plans to run a print ad in People magazine featuring a baby’s hand holding onto a mother’s finger under the headline: “A parent’s love is the same the world over.”

Oreo

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The cookie brand tweeted out a simple photo: An Oreo and milk-filled baby bottle sitting atop a very royal-looking, plush, velvet cushion. The tweet offers this: “Prepare the royal bottle service!”

Play-Doh

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Magnum

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Starbucks

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Delta Airlines

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Air New Zealand

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Diet Coke

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OXO

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Sony Pictures

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Nintendo

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Lego

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MINI

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Vegas

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Nescafé

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15 Most Insightful Call for Entries Ads

1 – ADC-UA Awards (Ukraine)/Agency: Leo Burnett Ukraine

2 – The 2002 Marketing Awards/Agency: Taxi Canadamarketing-awards-hack-small-18780

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3 – Art Director’s Club CdF 2006/Photographer Vincent Dixon

4 – The Art Directors Club CfE 2002/Bozell New York

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5 – The Singapore Creative Circle Awards 1997/Leo Burnett Singapore

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6 – Creative Club of Belgium (Call for entry 2005)/Agency: Duval Guilarme, Brussels

7 – The KBP Radio Awards, C.f.E 2007/Agency: BBDO Guerrera Ortega, Philippines

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8 – The Art Director’s Club CdF 2009/Agency: Publicis New York

9 – Clio Awards 2004/Agency: ALMAP/BBDO

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10 – The Art Director’s Club Cdf 2011/Agency: DDB New York

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11 – Crèa Awards 2007/Agency: BOS, Canada

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12 – The One Club Call for Entries 2007/Agency: Jupiter Drawing Room, South Africa

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13 – AdAwards Call for Entries 2006/Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, Paris

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14 – ADC 92° Annual Awards/Agency: The Conquistadors Collective, New York

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15 – The Tinta Awards Call for Entries 2012/Agency: Young & Rubicam Philippines

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From Coke to Mikado – Don’t Underestimate the Power of a Red Button

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Mikado – Resistance Test

Advertising Agency: Buzzman, Paris, France
CEO / Creative Director: Georges Mohammed-Chérif
Art Director: Louis Audard
Copywriter: Tristan Daltroff
Art Director Assistant: Clément Séchet
Year: 2013

 

TNT TV Channel – Dramatic surprise on an ice-cold day

Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume Modem, Brussels
Creative Director: Geoffrey Hantson, Katrien Bottez
Copywriter: Dieter De Ridder
Art Director: Ad Van Ongeval
Production Company: Czar
Director: Koen Mortier
Year: 2013

 

Fantastic Delites – How Far Would You Go?

The Delite-o-matic is an interactive vending machine that dispenses free packs of Fantastic Delites simply by pushing a button hundreds of times or by performing challenges. The Delite-o-matic was put out on the streets to prove that because Fantastic Delites taste so good, people will go to incredible lengths to get their hands on them.

Advertising Agency: Clemenger BBDO, Australia
Creative Director: Karl Fleet
Digital Creative / Art Director: Oliver Prenton
Digital Creative / Copywriter: Matt O’Grady
Year: 2012

 

TNT TV Channel – Big Red Push Button

To launch the high quality TV channel TNT in Belgium we placed a big red push button on an average Flemish square of an average Flemish town. A sign with the text “Push to add drama” invited people to use the button.

Advertising Agency: Duval Guillaume Modem, Brussels
Creative Director: Geoffrey Hantson, Katrien Bottez
Copywriter: Dieter De Ridder
Art Director: Ad Van Ongeval
Production Company: Czar
Director: Koen Mortier
Year: 2012

 

Coca-Cola – Happiness Truck

A Coca-Cola delivery truck is converted into a happiness machine on wheels delivering “doses” of happiness in the streets of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. Where will happiness strike next?

Advertising Agency: Definition 6, Atlanta
Year: 2011


Welcome to ROACHVILLE from TBWA Johannesburg

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TBWA Hunt Lascaris Johannesburg’s brief was to conceptualise an outdoor campaign that illustrates that Doom Fogger gets into every nook and cranny, killing insects before they get too comfortable. Using cracks on outdoor walls, they created a make-believe world, showing cockroaches in different environments. This was achieved by creating miniature furniture and using actual cockroaches to depict real life scenarios inside the cracks.

Advertising Agency: TBWA, South Africa
Executive Creative Directors: Matthew Bring, Adam Livesey
Creative Director: Justin Wright
Art Director: Sifiso Nkabinde
Copywriter: Thokozani Mashigo
Agency Producer: Sharon Cvetkovski
Account Manager: Vanessa Maselwa.
Production: Birthmark
Director of photography: Rowan Cloete
Producer: Matthew Durant
Year: 2012


Best Not-So-Romantic Valentine’s Day Ads

McDonald’s France

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Tampax

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Indirapuram Habitat Club SPA

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Swatch

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SexyAvenue.com

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Wurst

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Naksatra Jewellery

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Straps Lingerie Store

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Thrifty

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Renault

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NW/Natural Water

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Axe

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Radio Corazon

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Natan

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Splash Lingerie

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Wonderbra

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Yemeksepeti.com (food delivery)

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Court TV’s Parco PI – That Girl Emily

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To generate a buzz leading up to the season premiere of Parco PI on the American network Court TV (now truTV), a show that revolved heavily around the subject of adultery, a campaign was conjured up that – at first glance – looked like every cheating man’s worst nightmare. A fictitious character called Emily seemed set on exposing her husband’s adulterous ways for the whole world to see and having her revenge. In a blog Emily drew readers into the story of how she came to realize that her husband was cheating on her. Within several days, the blog had received over a million hits and Emily was getting requests for media appearances at a national level. The narrative laid the foundation for a series of billboards on which Emily declared “Fourteen Days of Wrath” against her cheating husband, Steven. Four of the Fourteen Days of Wrath were actual staged events in New York City. When Emily threw out her cheating husband’s belongings, the drama was captured on a hand-held camcorder and uploaded to video-sharing sites.

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The campaign as a whole was covered by over 200 news sources on-air, online and in print.

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Public Hath No Fury, Even When Deceived

From New York Times. By Julie Bosman (July 24, 2006)

It was the pitch-perfect vengeful Dear John letter, blown up on a billboard in the middle of Manhattan by a furious and apparently deep-pocketed spouse.

“Hi Steven,” it began, cheerily enough. “Do I have your attention now? I know all about her, you dirty, sneaky, immoral, unfaithful, poorly endowed slimeball. Everything’s caught on tape. Your (soon-to-be-ex) Wife, Emily.”

The billboard created interest, and not just from an unfaithful Steven. A booking agent from “Good Morning America” sent an e-mail to Emily inviting her on the show. British Glamour wanted to make her the subject of a feature article.

But when pictures of the billboard proliferated on Gawker, Defamer and other blogs, readers quickly dug in. One fact soon emerged, thanks to camera phone pictures: the billboard was identical to others in Brooklyn, Los Angeles and Chicago. Someone else discovered that Emily was keeping a blog, thatgirlemily.blogspot.com, detailing Steven’s infidelities. More digging showed that one Emily blog entry was oddly similar to a synopsis for an episode of “Parco P.I.,” a reality show on Court TV.

Another “source” sent an e-mail to Gawker suggesting that Court TV was behind the signs, pointing out that it was a viral marketing campaign to promote one of its programs. Mystery solved.

The bad news for viral marketers who use these kind of devices: executives at Court TV said they did not really want to be discovered so quickly. The good news is that even after the ruse was discovered, people visited the Emily blog, pushing it to one million hits by the end of Thursday. A fake surveillance video on the blog, supposedly from a private eye capturing Steven holding hands with his paramour, hit YouTube and became one of its most-viewed videos. Did it even matter that Emily was fictitious?

“Emily is really an amalgam of all of us who have been cheated on,” said Marc Juris, general manager for programming and marketing at Court TV. “Clearly, this really resonated with people.”

Whether it resonates into higher ratings for “Parco P.I.” is another matter. The “Emily” ruse was originally intended to be a stunt to help promote the start of the show’s new season on Aug. 15, but Court TV’s marketing group liked the idea so much that they made it a large part of the campaign. The second phase — ads for the show to be stamped over the original billboards — was to start next Monday, but Court TV moved it up to July 26 after all the attention.

Mr. Juris was still marveling: “It’s like a flash investigation took place, and within 24 hours we were busted.”

LDog.0

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Advertising Agency: Amalgamated NYC, USA
Copywriter: Tommy Noonan
Copywriter: Jon Yasgur
Account Manager: Judy Goldfarb
Creative Director: JASON GABORIAU
Creative Director: Doug Cameron
Year: 2006


Happy New Year Ads

Happy New Year from BRUSSELS AIRLINES

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Happy New Year from DISCO SUPERMARKETS

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Happy New Year from DURACELL

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Happy New Year from DUREX

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Happy New Year from TMB (Metro de Barcelona)

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Happy New Year from ALKA SELTZER

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Happy New Year from AUDI

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Happy New Year from AXE

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Happy New Year from BARILLA

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Happy New Year from YES Tablet

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Happy New Year from MIKADO

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Happy New Year from HONDA

 

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Happy New Year from BMW

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Happy New Year from O.B.

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TBWA/Berlin for adidas – A Giant Case History

IMPOSSIBLE GOALKEEPER

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Just before the start of the UEFA Euro 2008 football tournament, adidas turned one of Vienna’s best-known landmarks, the Prater ferris wheel, into a huge image of the Czech national goalkeeper, Petr Cech. At a whooping 53m tall, this gigantic installation was visible far beyond the Prater entertainment park and the nearby public viewing sites. In the installation, Cech had eight arms that constantly rotated with the ferries wheel. The erection of the metal construction started on May 13 and was finished just before the launch of the tournament on the night of June 5, 2008. This advertising landmark also hosted the official adidas press conference prior to the tournament.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt
Creative: Marco Bezerra, Emiliano Treierveiler

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OLIVER KAHN BRIDGE

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If you travelled to Munich for the first game of the FIFA World Cup in 2006, chances are you saw this huge installation, which shows an enormous Oliver Kahn (the then German national team goalkeeper) diving across the motorway. The 65-m installation managed to bypass the law forbidding advertising on the German Autobahn, and was the only piece of advertising adidas conducted in Germany during the tournament. Over 4 millions people commuted through the installation and many more saw it in the press. In its first week the Oliver Kahn bridge was displayed on double-page spreads in leading magazines including Focus, Stern, Autobild and Fortune. It was also picked up by newspapers including the New York Times and the Financial Times.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Kurt-Georg Dieckert
Creative: Helge Bloch, Boris Schwiedrzik

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IMPOSSIBLE HUDDLE

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For the duration of the UEFA EURO 2008 football tournament, TBWA/Berlin transformed the main hall of Zurich’s Central Station into a large-scale celebration of team spirit. Eleven European football players (all sponsored by adidas, naturally) formed the Impossible huddle. The bodies of the footballers represented were 3D-scanned as were their faces and hairstyles, to ensure that the sculptures were faithful to the originals. It took 40 trucks to move the installation components from the production sites in southern Germany to Switzerland, where they were assembled in the station.

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The Swiss rail authority reported that an estimate 13 million people passed through the station during the three-week period the sculptural installation was in site, and at 17m high and approximately 30m wide, it was impossible to miss. Add to this the fact that various news titles such as the Financial Times, Die Welt, Gazzetta dello Sport, Le Parisien and the BBC featured the campaign on their front pages or online editions, plus the fact that it was picked up by dozens of blog worldwide.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Markus Ewertz
Creative: Erik Gonan, Hendrik Scweder

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FOOTBALL FRESCO

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During the German-hosted 2006 FIFA World Cup, adidas wanted to get across the message that they cooperate with the best football players on the planet. Rather than run a traditional poster campaign, the creatives at TBWA/Berlin decided it would be far more impressive to create a huge Renaissance-style fresco on the ceiling of the main lobby of Cologne Central Station. Within minutes of the fresco’s unveiling, it was featured on national German Television and press covered it throughout the World Cup. More than 8.5 million people saw the frersco in the flesh during the course of the tournament.

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Advertising Agency: TBWA/Berlin
Creative Director: Stefan Schmidt, Kurt-Georg Dieckert
Creative: Helge Bloch, Boris Schwiedrzik


Haddon Sundblom for Coca-Cola – The Man Who Painted Christmas

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Though he was not the first artist to create an image of Santa Claus for Coca-Cola advertising, Haddon Sundblom’s version became the standard for other Santa renditions and is the most-enduring and widespread depiction of the holiday icon to this day. Coca-Cola’s Santa artworks would change the world’s perception of the North Pole’s most-famous resident forever and would be adopted by people around the world as the popular image of Santa.

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In the 1920s, The Coca-Cola Company began to promote soft drink consumption for the winter holidays in U.S. magazines. The first Santa ads for Coke used a strict-looking Claus. In 1930, a Coca-Cola advertised with a painting by Fred Mizen, showing a department store Santa impersonator drinking a bottle of Coke amid a crowd of shoppers and their children.
Not long after, a magical transformation took place. Archie Lee, then the agency advertising executive for The Coca-Cola Company, wanted the next campaign to show a wholesome Santa as both realistic and symbolic. In 1931, the Company commissioned Haddon Sundblom, a Michigan-born illustrator and already a creative giant in the industry, to develop advertising images using Santa Claus. Sundblom envisioned this merry gentleman as an opposite of the meager look of department store Santa imitators from early 20th century America.

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Sundblom turned to Clement Moore’s classic poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” (better known as “’Twas the Night Before Christmas”) for inspiration:

His eyes — how they twinkled! His dimples: how merry,
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry;
His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow

The ode’s description of the jolly old elf inspired Sundblom to create an image of Santa that was friendly, warm and human, a big change from the sometimes-harsh portrayals of Santa up to that time. He painted a perfectly lovable patron saint of the season, with a white beard flowing over a long red coat generously outlined with fur, an enormous brass buckle fastening a broad leather belt, and large, floppy boots.

Sundblom’s Santa was very different from the other Santa artworks: he radiated warmth, reminded people of their favorite grandfather, a friendly man who lived life to the fullest, loved children, enjoyed a little honest mischief, and feasted on snacks left out for him each Christmas Eve . Coca-Cola’s Christmas campaign featuring this captivating Santa ran year after year.

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As distribution of Coca-Cola and its ads spread farther around the world, Sundblom’s Santa Claus became more memorable each season, in more and more countries. The character became so likable, The Coca-Cola Company and Haddon Sundblom struck a partnership that would last for decades. Over a span of 33 years, Haddon Sundblom painted imaginative versions of the “Coca-Cola Santa Claus” for for Coke advertising, retail displays and posters.

Sundblom initially modeled Santa’s smiling face after the cheerful looks of a friend, retired salesman Lou Prentiss. “He embodied all the features and spirit of Santa Claus,” Sundblom said. “The wrinkles in his face were happy wrinkles.” After Prentiss passed away, the Swedish-American Sundblom used his own face as the ongoing reference for painting the now-enduring, modern image of Santa Claus.

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In 1951, Sundblom captured the Coca-Cola Santa “making his list and checking it twice.” However, the ads did not acknowledge that bad children existed and showed pages of good boys and girls only. Mischievous and magical, the Coca-Cola Santa was not above raiding the refrigerator during his annual rounds, stealing a playful moment with excited children and pets, or pausing to enjoy a Coca-Cola during stops on his one-night, worldwide trek. When air adventures became popular, Santa also could be caught playing with a toy helicopter around the tree.

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Haddon Sundblom passed away in 1976, but The Coca-Cola Company continues to use a variety of his timeless depictions of Saint Nicholas in holiday advertising, packaging and other promotional activities. The classic Coca-Cola Santa images created by Sundblom are as ubiquitous today as the character they represent and have become universally accepted as the personification of the patron saint of both children and Christmas.

As Joanna Berry, Lecturer in Marketing at Newcastle University Business School, explains: “Whilst Sundblom didn’t invent Santa as the jolly, white haired rotund old man we all now expect, he certainly did more than anyone to imprint that image onto our minds in relation to Coca-Cola in one of the most enduring brand images ever to have been created.”

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A tribute to Haddon Sundblom from “Coke Side of Life” Campaign

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